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  1. Certificate in Disability Inclusion and Accessible Design

    The Online Certificate in Disability Inclusion and Accessible Design (DIAD) is designed for social workers and other professionals who are interested in developing skills and sharpening their lens related to disability inclusion, and who strive to make their practice more accessible to and relevant for people with disabilities. The program faculty includes scholars, activists, and others working on the frontlines of disability inclusion and accessibility. Participants will learn about pertinent policy issues affecting people with disabilities, anti-ableist language and practices, accessible interpersonal clinical practice skills, disability inclusive community organizing skills, how to create inclusive management structures and organizational policies, among other topics. Participants will also receive training on American Disability Act (ADA) guidelines, understand the limitations of ADA standards, and gain the knowledge and skills to evaluate and assess built environments and institutional policies for ADA compliance and beyond.

    Objectives

    • Describe how disability inclusion aligns with social work values and ethics.
    • Create more accessible and inclusive learning experiences and environments.
    • Assess, evaluate, and make recommendations to modify built and social infrastructure to be more accessible for people with an array of disabilities.
    • Identify issues, stressors, and stigmatization that caregivers face and identify strategies to support them.
    • Describe how racism, sexism, gender violence, and other forms of oppression intersect to compound oppression faced by people with disabilities and additional marginalized identities.
    • Describe ways to create a more accessible interpersonal practice for people with disabilities.
    • Describe the "circle of friends" approach to supporting people with disabilities.
    • Create more accessible and inclusive organizational environments through culture-building, policies, and practices.
    • Identify strategies to be more inclusive of people with disabilities in community organizing and advocacy efforts.
    • Describe how racism and anti-Blackness is intrinsically linked and perpetuated by ableism.
    • Describe how the Americans with Disabilities Act impacts the lives of people with disabilities.
    • Explain how specific local, state, and federal policies and programs impact people with disabilities.
    • Identify areas in which the Americans with Disabilities act could be strengthened.
    • Describe how ableism impacts the elderly with disabilities, elder law, and elder advocacy.
    • Explain the need for body-positive and sex-positive representations that are inclusive of people with disabilities.
    • Define ableism and describe how it harms people with disabilities and others.
    • Apply disability inclusion principles in practice.
    • Identify appropriate and inappropriate language and "normative behaviors" when describing with people with disabilities, disability culture, and the movement for disability justice.
    hybrid certificate program

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 ethics asynchronous online
    • 16 regular asynchronous online
    • 1 regular live interactive online

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Location

    online
  2. Certificate in Political Social Work

    The Certificate in Political Social Work is designed for all social workers, regardless of area of primary practice, to fulfill their ethical obligation to engage in social and political action. Participants of this certificate program will learn how politics impacts the lives of those that they serve on both a micro and macro level, practice skills for advocating to policymakers, gain tools to empower clients to become politically engaged, and explore opportunities for running for office.

    Foundations of Political Social Work: This module will include the historical and current role of social workers in the political process as well as knowledge that is core to political social work practice. Topics include: emerging political social work research and theory, political justice, ethics in political social work, and foundational skills in communicating political information.

    Tools for Political Social Work: This module will cover skills and strategies that social workers can apply to their current practice as well as tools to enhance their political engagement. Topics include: identifying and combating fake news, advocacy and activism, and running campaigns.

    Special Knowledge Areas for Political Social Work: This module covers important topic areas social workers should be familiar with when engaging in political social work practice, including organized labor and immigration. This module is intended to be responsive to emerging political topics relevant to social work.

    Objectives

    • Describe major political social work theories.
    • Describe research methods and findings in political social work.
    • Define "political justice" and describe its connection to social work practice.
    • Describe the ethical responsibility of social workers to engage in political work.
    • Identify potential ethical dilemmas that social workers encounter while doing political work.
    • Identify strategies and skills to hold and facilitate discussions across political divides.
    • Describe the ethical basis for being involved in resolving division within organizations and communities.
    • Describe how the day-to-day work of being an elected official relates to social work ethics and values.
    • Describe how to identify and advocate to your appointed and elected officials.
    • Describe methods of engaging in political advocacy and activism.
    • Describe the skills needed to successfully campaign for elected office.
    • Describe the skills needed to successfully fundraise for electoral campaigns.
    • Identify the different kinds of political campaigns.
    • Describe methods for targeting voters to support your cause.
    • Identify opportunities for coalition building within communities and organizations.
    • Describe the skills needed to establish and maintain key relationships to ensure coalition success.
    • Apply political social work practice in a workplace setting.
    • Describe acceptable ways to advocate for your agency’s mission and to engage clients in advocating for themselves.
    • Define "fake news" and understand its impact on society.
    • Identify reputable news sources and how to counter fake news.
    • Identify the most effective graphs/charts and design choices to convey your desired message.
    • Describe the foundational skills of working with undocumented and mixed status communities.
    • Identify best practices, legal restrictions, and resources that impact the lives of undocumented immigrants.
    • Describe the importance of tax policy to social work practice.
    • Define "environmental justice" and describe its connection to social work practice.
    • Explain how climate change is an example of environmental injustice.
    • Describe the structure and function of the two major US political parties.
    • Describe the past, present, and potential future relationships between social work and organized labor. Identify mutual interests and opportunities between social work and labor. Describe the role that unions play in the economy, in democracy, and in communities.
    hybrid certificate program

    Sessions

    • self-paced

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 ethics asynchronous online
    • 26 regular asynchronous online
    • 1 regular live interactive online

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Location

    online
  3. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for Psychosis

    Schizophrenia is a chronic and severe mental illness affecting roughly 26 million people, equating to 1% of the global population. Psychosis is experienced within schizophrenia spectrum or other psychotic disorders in addition to several other disorders, often framed as being 'psychotic features.' Since the majority of mental health services in the US are delivered by social workers, it is important for clinicians to be prepared for work with clients including the need for interventions tailored to the experience of psychosis. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for psychosis is a cognitive and behavioral approach tailored for individuals experiencing psychosis and is an effective and valuable evidence-based intervention to use in practice.

    This webinar will discuss an overview of psychosis and its prevalence, a brief overview of CBT theory and basics, a central focus on intervention using CBT for psychosis, and the use of 2 clinical cases.

    Objectives

    • Name and describe 2 symptoms of psychosis (can be positive or negative).
    • Name and describe 2 specific CBT tools to use in treatment of psychosis (can be cognitive or behavioral).
    webinar (asynchronous)

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 regular asynchronous online

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Location

    online
  4. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for Suicide Prevention

    Suicide is a leading cause of preventable death in the United States and worldwide. Nearly 50% of individuals who end life by suicide see a primary care provider within a month of death, yet suicide risk assessment and treatment is consistently difficult in practice. With the majority of mental health services in the US being delivered by social workers, it is imperative that knowledge and skills are in place for our work with clients with the ultimate goal being to prevent premature suicidal death. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for suicide prevention is an evidence-based intervention is a valuable and effective approach to use in practice for individuals experiencing suicidal ideation and/or whom have made an attempt.

    This webinar will discuss suicide as public health issue in the US, suicide risk assessment, a brief overview of CBT theory and basics, and a central focus on intervention using CBT for suicide prevention.

    Objectives

    • Describe two challenges in practice when conducting a suicide assessment.
    • Name and describe 2 specific CBT for suicide prevention tools (can be cognitive or behavioral).
    webinar (asynchronous)

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 regular asynchronous online

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Location

    online
  5. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for Depressive Disorders

    Depression is a leading cause of disability in the United States and worldwide. It is estimated that one in five individuals will experience depression in their lifetime, and while these symptoms are common, under-treatment is often seen in practice. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a valuable evidence-based intervention and effective approach to use in practice for individuals experiencing depressive disorders. This workshop will discuss depressive disorders, CBT theory, and use of CBT to treat depressive disorders.

    Objectives

    • Name 2 components of a cognitive case conceptualization
    • Describe 2 CBT tools or techniques used in treatment of depression
    webinar (asynchronous)

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1.5 regular asynchronous online

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Location

    online
  6. EMDR: Guiding Healing Through Self Determination

    This workshop will provide an introduction to Eye Movement Desensitization Reprocessing (EMDR) and its uses in client lead healing related to trauma and a myriad of other presenting problems. Learners will explore an overview of the EMDR process and how it fits within a larger collaborative clinical framework. Case studies will explore how the process is client lead and allows for self determination within the goal development and healing process.

    Objectives

    • Describe key elements of the EMDR process.
    • Identify the specific ways clients are able to identify their own healing goals through the EMDR assessment.
    webinar (asynchronous)

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 ethics asynchronous online
    • 1 regular asynchronous online

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Location

    online
  7. Foundations of Sport Social Work

    This course will serve as an introduction to the foundations of sport social work. It will explore how social work and sport have worked in parallel to combat racism, oppression, inequality, and discrimination which has been an integral part of our society's history and development. The course will examine the intersection of the history of social work and the professionalization of athletics. Foundational knowledge of understanding sport social work practice will include identifying the role of sport social workers, defining sport social work practice, and looking at Social Work's Values and Ethics and CSWE competencies through a sport social work lens. With the role of social workers being to serve and advocate for vulnerable populations, athletes will be identified and defined as a vulnerable population and key human development theories will be applied to sport social work. Finally, evidence-based practices will be discussed throughout the course, but specifically, research trends, the current state and future directions of sport social work will be analyzed.

    Objectives

    • Define "Sport Social Work" and describe how it promotes social justice and change.
    • Describe the ethical responsibility of social workers to engage in work with vulnerable populations such as athletes across the lifespan and apply social work theories and evidence-based practice interventions with athletes.
    webinar (asynchronous)

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 ethics asynchronous online
    • 1 regular asynchronous online

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Instructors

    Location

    online
  8. Human Trafficking in Healthcare and Human Service Settings: A Macro Social Work Approach

    This course meets the human trafficking training standards outlined in Michigan Administrative Code R. 338.604.

    U.S. law defines human trafficking as the use of force, fraud, or coercion to compel a person into commercial sex acts or labor or services against their will. The one exception involves minors and commercial sex. Inducing a minor into commercial sex is considered human trafficking regardless of the presence of force, fraud or coercion. Although Social Impact Organizations typically are not the first place victims and survivors of human trafficking turn to for support, it is incumbent on organizations to use social work ethics to provide a culture and an atmosphere that intentionally supports victims and survivors.

    This webinar will begin with an understanding of the types and venues of human trafficking in the United States, how to identify victims of human trafficking in health care and community settings, an awareness of warning signs of human trafficking in health care settings and community organizations for adults and minors, as well as how to report suspected human trafficking. Focusing primarily on macro practices, we will discuss how to cultivate trauma-informed care and practices into social impact organizations, and the manifestation of complex trauma in clients. This webinar will explore ways for practitioners to nurture an organizational culture that supports victims and survivors, whether they make their experiences known or not. We will use the voices of survivors and victims to inform practices that support and empower clients.

    Objectives

    • Identify basic definitional, ethical, and legal issues in human trafficking.
    • Describe the relationship between trauma-informed care and organizational culture and identify organizational practices that support survivors and victims of human trafficking.
    webinar (asynchronous)

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 ethics asynchronous online
    • 1 regular asynchronous online

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Instructors

    Location

    online
  9. Just Fundraising

    Social impact organizations secure resources through a variety of methods, including fees, grants, contracts, financial gifts, in-kind (non-cash) contributions, and investments. This course focuses on developing resources through fundraising and grant writing. Using a lens of social justice and ethics, participants will explore the tensions and paradoxes associated with fundraising and grant writing.

    Objectives

    • Describe how to identify, cultivate, steward, and sustain mutually beneficial relationships with potential funders and donors.
    • Identify ethical and social justice concerns related to applying for, accepting, and managing grants and donations.
    webinar (asynchronous)

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2.5 regular asynchronous online

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Instructor

    Location

    online
  10. Online Certificate in Advanced Clinical Dementia Practice

    Dementia is the second most prevalent mental disorder affecting older adults, the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S., and is present in one-third of older adults at the time of death. In order to understand and to respond effectively to the needs of our clients, clinicians must appreciate the complex interactions of disease pathology, individual strengths, environmental conditions, informal supports, formal resources, and societal influences. The purpose of this self-paced certificate program is to prepare clinical practitioners for advanced practice with clients and families affected by dementia.

    Objectives

    • Categorize and define the multiple symptoms of dementia.
    • Identify resulting challenges associated with disorders of dementia.
    • Implement key person-centered care principles into daily practice.
    • Utilize understanding and principles of health disparities, cultural competence and the impact on aging individuals to be more skillful in facilitating professional patient dialog and interaction.
    • Identify and reflect on biological aspects of dementia.
    • Describe the basic structure of the brain.
    • Explain normal changes in the aging brain and in cognitive and behavioral functioning.
    • Describe the impact of dementia on our aging society.
    • Identify ethical considerations and policy issues related to the use of genetic tests and biomarkers.
    • Identify best practices and state of the art diagnostic tools for assessing cognitive and behavioral changes, and the implications of Mild Cognitive Impairment on dementia.
    • Identify and reflect on gaps of self­-knowledge related to caregiving, community resources and care planning throughout the dementia journey.
    • Identify and reflect on gaps of self­-knowledge related to caregiving, community resources and care planning throughout the dementia journey.
    • Identify some common emotional and psychological reactions to experiencing cognitive change.
    • Describe health disparities pertaining to Alzheimer's disease and related dementias.
    • Describe cultural competence related to ethnic and cultural differences in caregiving roles and expectations.
    • Explain the importance of legal and financial planning in relation to culture and individual differences to preserve choice, self­-determination and personhood.
    • Explain the importance of legal and financial planning in relation to culture and individual differences to preserve choice, self­-determination and personhood.
    • Identify dispute resolution approaches in addressing family dynamics.
    • Apply best practice approaches to responding to individual and family challenges in adjusting to key transition points throughout the dementia journey.
    • Identify ethical issues in advanced care planning and end of life decision making. Describe hospice and palliative care options and criteria and implement best practices in facilitating end of life conversations with patients and families.
    • Identify and reflect on gaps of self-knowledge related to behavioral assessment and interventions.
    • Describe the impact of personal characteristics, culture and background of an individual with dementia on his/her journey through the middle stages of the disease.
    • Identify the contribution of chronic illness and the aging process to the behaviors of individuals with dementia.
    • Describe the contribution of anxiety and depression to understanding the person's journey.
    • List common behavioral challenges in mid stage dementia.
    • Identify risks and triggers in the assessment of behavior changes and implement best practices in person­-centered interventions.
    • Identify risks and triggers in the assessment of behavior changes and implement best practices in person­-centered interventions.
    • Identify the effect of chronic stress on coping and well-being.
    • Describe the latest research and implications in wellness practices, such as exercise, tai chi, yoga, etc., for individuals, caregivers, and healthcare professionals.
    • Describe how expressive arts, such as storytelling, music, painting, and movement can improve quality of life in the home and in residential care throughout the dementia journey.
    • Implement simple and brief mindfulness-based practices to foster a healthy work-life balance.
    • Identify and reflect on gaps of self-knowledge related to prevention research and strategies.
    • Identify current prevention trials and explore the implications of prevention research.
    • Describe research behind the heart-brain connection and the neuroprotective properties of exercise, diet, mental activity, and socialization.
    • Explain public policy efforts and interventions needed to address the Alzheimer's epidemic.
    • Describe an innovative practice change model: ACT on Alzheimer's.
    • Explore the role of dementia experts in leading change. Demonstrate assessment and intervention approaches through case study presentation.
    hybrid certificate program

    CE Contact Hours

    • 31 regular asynchronous online
    • 3 regular live interactive online

    Skill Level

    Advanced

    Location

    online

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