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  1. Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment (CBT) for Depressive Disorders

    This course will focus on the cognitive-behavioral treatment of depression. The course will begin with a review of the nature and diagnosis of depressive disorders. The course will focus on the techniques of behavioral activation and cognitive restructuring. Several case examples will be utilized and students will engage in role-play and detailed class discussion focused on these techniques. Emphasis will be given to practical application of therapy techniques. The course will also include strategies for enhancing adherence to behavioral homework assignments.

    Objectives

    • Describe the nature of depressive disorders.
    • Describe the prevalence and impact of depression.
    • Describe a basic approach to CBT for depression.
    • Describe the role of behavioral activation in CBT for depression.
    • Formulate examples of behavioral activation in CBT for depression.
    • Demonstrate emerging behavioral activation skills in role play experiences.
    • Describe the role of cognitive restructuring in CBT for depression.
    • Formulate examples of cognitive restructuring in CBT for depression.
    • Demonstrate emerging cognitive restructuring skills in role play experiences.
    • Explain the relationship between behavioral activation and cognitive restructuring in CBT for depression.
    • Demonstrate emerging skills in combining behavioral activation and cognitive restructuring in CBT for depression via role play and case demonstrations.
    • Describe the role of maladaptive schema in the CBT treatment of depression.
    • Demonstrate emerging skills in addressing maladaptive schema in the CBT treatment of depression.
    • Describe the application of CBT for depression in underserved groups and international populations.
    • Describe treatment research related to CBT and its effectiveness.
    • Demonstrate integrated knowledge of behavioral activation, cognitive restructuring and modifying maladaptive schema in the form of a written response to a case example.
    face-to-face in-service training workshop

    Sessions

    • 2/7/2020 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
    • 2/14/2020 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 14 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: B798

    Fees

    $265.00
  2. Higher Education Supports for Youth with Experience in Foster Care

    This session is focused how to support and facilitate academic success within higher education for students who have experienced foster care. Nationally about 50% of children who experience foster care will graduate high school and about 2-4% of those will earn a four year degree. This presentation will give an overview of educational outcomes as well as the barriers and unique needs of students who have experienced foster as well as strategies, tools, and resources that DHHS foster care workers and other supportive adults can use in their practice when working with young people navigating educational options.

    Objectives

    • Describe educational outcomes for foster youth.
    • Identify barriers for educational success for foster youth.
    • Identify resources and strategies to support children in foster care to increase educational success.
    face-to-face in-service training workshop

    Sessions

    • 2/7/2020 9:00 AM to 12:15 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 3 regular in-person

    Skill Level

    Beginner & Intermediate

    Instructors

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 S University
    Ann Arbor
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: 3629
  3. Psychopharmacology for Social Workers

    This course has a clinical focus and practical orientation; therefore, we will examine basic neuropsychopharmacology, neurotransmitter systems, drug metabolism, and the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of psychotropic medications to only a limited degree. Our emphasis will be on primarily on understanding the physiological actions, therapeutic effects, and potential toxicities associated with prescribed pharmacotherapies for major classes of mental disorders affecting youth, adults and older adults.

    Objectives

    • Describe physiological actions of medications and differentiate among the types of currently available psychotropic medications.
    • Describe the significance of drug metabolism, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics involved with psychotropic medications
    • Name the brain areas and neurotransmitters involved and altered by psychiatric illness and medications.
    • Identify which medications are clinically indicated for depressive disorders.
    • Describe risk vs. benefits of different medications (therapeutic effects, side effects, adverse reactions).
    • Identify which medications are clinically indicated for bipolar disorders.
    • Identify which medications are clinically indicated for psychotic disorders.
    • Describe risk vs. benefits of different medications as it relates to specific case discussions.
    • Identify which medications are clinically indicated for anxiety disorders.
    • Identify which medications are clinically indicated for attention deficit disorders.
    • Identify which medications are clinically indicated for substance use disorders.
    • Identify legal issues in psychopharmacology for social workers.
    • Describe the complementary and alternative medicine used in psychiatry.
    • Identify ethical issues in psychopharmacology for social workers.
    • Identify rewards and challenges of interdisciplinary collaboration between social workers and prescribing physicians.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 2/8/2020 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
    • 2/15/2020 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 15 regular in-person

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 S University Ave,
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: B760

    Fees

    $265.00
  4. Art and Design for Social Work, Social Justice and Social Change

    This course is aimed to create the following impacts on student learning: increased knowledge of the history of community based art and design in the US; increased knowledge of methods for collaborative community based art and design; develop skills in collaboration with community groups in developing community based art and design projects; Knowledge and skills to evaluate the impact of community based art and design activity.

    Our class is organized around principles of adragogy (adult learning), empowerment, and collaboration. We will develop a co­learning environment that will include presentations, skill building activities and exercises, speakers, and different media. Experiential activities will be central to the structure and process of this course.

    Objectives

    • Describe ways in which live and abstract art by women artists and artists of color addresses politics.
    • Analyze the public view of abstract art as a retreat from politics and protest - an abnegation of a commitment to civil rights and feminism.
    • Outline the history of community-based art and design in the US.
    • Describe methods for collaborative community based art and design through critical review of case histories and interviews with artists.
    • Apply model of socially-just practice in considering use of art and design for social change.
    • Apply model of ethical decision-making in considering art and design for social changes in communities and communal spaces.
    • Evaluate the impact of community based art and design activity.
    • Outline the history of live art.
    • Engage with live art in both embodied and analytical ways (as audience, artist, and scholar-historian).
    • Critically analyze ways in which artists' bodies are displayed, made vulnerable, and empowered.
    • Describe ways that performance art can challenge boundaries between audience/performer.
    • Identify potential ethical issues within live performance art.
    • Creatively reinterpret the work of an artist or movement covered in the course through a final public performance, commentary, or review.
    • Describe how live art responds to the social structures of its time.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 3/13/2020 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
    • 3/20/2020 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 ethics in-person
    • 12 regular in-person

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    TBD
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: B780

    Fees

    $265.00
  5. Philanthropy and Evaluation

    This mini-course will focus on issues of contemporary philanthropy and the ways in which both philanthropic entities and their grantees can evaluate the efficiency, effectiveness and impact of philanthropic investments.

    Objectives

    • Outline the history of philanthropy within the US.
    • Describe contemporary trends pertaining to philanthropy and learn how to develop a network of philanthropic partners.
    • Identify the various types of philanthropic organizations and current social media trends pertaining to philanthropy.
    • Locate foundations and access 990 forms to inform their selection of a foundation for application.
    • Describe considerations and criteria for selecting a foundation.
    • Describe investments trends from the individual to the organizational level.
    • Describe how foundations are using place-based and system-focused giving strategies as well as capacity-building investment.
    • Describe how various foundations approach evaluation and measurement of impact with their grantees.
    • Develop measureable indicators and locate standardized scales to measure participant impact.
    • Use a mission money matrix to better understand program financial sustainability and impact.
    • Describe three foundations and their approaches to building grantee evaluation capacity.
    • Develop a case study of a foundation that matches their area of interest.
    • Critically review grantee evaluation reports.
    • Describe career opportunities within philanthropy and as evaluation practitioners.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 3/14/2020 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
    • 3/21/2020 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 3 regular synchronous interactive
    • 12.5 regular asynchronous online

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Instructor

    Location

    School of Social Work
    1080 South University
    TBD
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: B780

    Fees

    $265.00
  6. Alumni Webinar Series: Financial Therapy -- What is it and how can it help your clients?

    Financial therapy is a relatively new hybrid between the worlds of personal finance professionals and mental health professionals. For social workers, learning more about personal finances in a way that goes above providing resources and advocating for clients is paramount. In this webinar, you'll learn how this specialty came to be and how it can help you personally and professionally.

    Note: This webinar is free for U-M SSW alumni.

    Objectives

    • Describe the importance of providing education to social workers on financial therapy.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 3/16/2020 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 regular synchronous interactive

    Skill Level

    Beginner & Intermediate

    Instructor

    • Lindsay Bryan-Podvin

    Location

    online
  7. Social Work Services That Make a Difference: Meaningful Supports for Transgender Youth and Their Families

    Please note: This course will be moved online. More details will be provided by the instructor.

    This course will offer a working definition of terms, including Transgender, Gender Identity, Gender Expression, Intersex, Gender Nonconforming, Non Binary, Intersex, Gender Transition, and Ally. Language and terminology will be examined with emphasis on using affirming language and avoiding offensive terminology.

    This course will examine multiple risk factors that impact transgender youth from a solution-focused lens. These risk factors include a 40- 50 percent rate of attempted suicide, increased incidence of homelessness, school bullying and harassment, increased vulnerability to hate crimes (including assault, sexual assault and murder). Family relationship dynamics, along with strategies to increase family support, will be explored with an emphasis on increasing parental capacity to support the transgender youth. Family acceptance is a protective factor that is associated with a decrease in transgender youth homeless and a decline in the frequency and severity of mental health issues and an increase in overall wellness. Strategies to support and build upon family and school connectedness will be examined in this mini course.

    This mini course will also examine be the specific concerns that apply to transgender children younger than age 13. Understanding gender identity at younger ages will be explored, along with specific facts about working within elementary and preschool setting, and offering long term guidance and planning recommendations to parents and children that are developmentally appropriate.

    The gender transition process will be reviewed.

    Objectives

    • Identify at least three risk factors facing transgender children and adolescents at home, school, and in the community.
    • Identify three or protective factors that positively impact outcomes for transgender clients.
    • Identify three intervention strategies to assist parents and other adult caregivers to support their children in the gender transition process.
    • Describe two ways to increase parental support of the transgender child, even in the face on parental resistance and will identify three strategies to increase parental support.
    • Identify at two strategies to implement to support transgender youth in schools.
    • Describe two strategies to implement to support and advocate for transgender youth in community settings.
    • Describe two strategies to implement to support transgender youth in social service agencies.
    • Use affirming language and terminology to describe trans and gender non-conforming children and youth.
    • Define intersex and describe how intersex differs from transgender.
    • Describe personal values with regard to transgender and gender non-conforming children and youth so any potential bias that may exist does not impede service delivery.
    • Identify the steps involved to legally change one's name and gender marker in conjunction with gender transition and how to attain these changes.
    • Describe two ways parents can take to support their younger child (under age 11) when a young child may identify as transgender or gender conforming.
    • Define gender dysphoria.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 3/23/2020 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 3/30/2020 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 4/6/2020 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 4/13/2020 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 4/20/2020 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 ethics synchronous interactive
    • 12 regular synchronous interactive

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Instructor

    Location

    online

    Fees

    $265.00
  8. Teletherapy: Start it up! Guidance for Social Workers

    NOTE: Thank you for your interest in our teletherapy course. Due to a truly unprecedented level of interest in this course, we've already exceeded capacity for continuing education participants.

    If you are interested in receiving a recording of the session, please submit the form at this link: https://ssw.umich.edu/r/teletherapy

    We are hoping to distribute the recording within 1-2 weeks of the course.

    ----------------------------

    This webinar is designed to support social workers, who, as a result of COVID-19, may be practicing telehealth/teletherapy for the first time. This webinar is also relevant to social workers with some experience in telehealth who may be interested in learning more about the ethical provision of clinical services online.

    The session will cover the definition and history of teletherapy, benefits and drawbacks of teletherapy for both providers and clients, and legal and ethical concerns, with specific attention to ethical considerations during COVID-19.

    Objectives

    • Describe ethical concerns that may present in the provision of teletherapy and identify strategies for mitigating these concerns.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 4/6/2020 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 ethics synchronous interactive

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Instructor

    Location

    online
  9. Working with Parents Coping with Mental Illness

    NOTE: We are waiting to determine whether this course will be held online.

    This part didactic, part experiential workshop will explore practices to engage with child welfare involved families with caregivers impacted by mental illness. It will explore common diagnostic criteria, what they mean, and how provider interactions can positively impact mental health for the better with engagement skills and strategies.

    Objectives

    • Describe the intersection between mental health and child welfare, and the impact that professionals have on child welfare-involved families.
    • Describe the common diagnosis and treatment that impact child welfare involved parents.
    • Identify engagement strategies that are strengths-based and trauma-informed, and implement those strategies in the work.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 4/10/2020 2:00 PM to 5:15 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 3 regular synchronous interactive

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Instructor

    Location

    online
  10. Behavioral or "Process" Addictions

    For the majority of time that addiction treatment has been available in the United States, the focus has been on the destructive misuse of alcohol &/or other chemical substances. However such "process addictions" as gambling, compulsive sexual behavior, and an increasing variety of internet-related pursuits have gained increasing amounts of attention, as unchecked involvement has led to negative outcomes that have impaired quality-of-life and crippled level-of-functioning for many. This webinar will discuss cross-cutting elements found to be common to all forms of chemical and behavioral addiction, as well as reviewing existing recovery resources and further implications for treatment & recovery.

    Objectives

    • Outline six elements of a working definition of addiction with cross-cutting application to chemical and behavioral manifestations.
    • Distinguish between gambling, compulsive sexual behaviors, and problematic internet-related behaviors, and identify three treatment approaches that hold promise for effective treatment across these target areas.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 4/28/2020 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 regular synchronous interactive

    Skill Level

    Beginner & Intermediate

    Instructor

    Location

    online

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