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  1. Behavioral or "Process" Addictions

    For the majority of time that addiction treatment has been available in the United States, the focus has been on the destructive misuse of alcohol &/or other chemical substances. However such "process addictions" as gambling, compulsive sexual behavior, and an increasing variety of internet-related pursuits have gained increasing amounts of attention, as unchecked involvement has led to negative outcomes that have impaired quality-of-life and crippled level-of-functioning for many. This webinar will discuss cross-cutting elements found to be common to all forms of chemical and behavioral addiction, as well as reviewing existing recovery resources and further implications for treatment & recovery.

    Objectives

    • Outline six elements of a working definition of addiction with cross-cutting application to chemical and behavioral manifestations.
    • Distinguish between gambling, compulsive sexual behaviors, and problematic internet-related behaviors, and identify three treatment approaches that hold promise for effective treatment across these target areas.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 4/28/2020 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 regular synchronous interactive

    Skill Level

    Beginner & Intermediate

    Instructor

    Location

    online
  2. Treatment of Internalized Racism and Anti-Blackness: Implications for Clinical Practice

    This course is designed to support practitioners in working with clients that present with internalized racism that leads to the perpetuation of dominant and supremacy culture through ideas, attitudes, behaviors, beliefs, and social interactions. Reviewing historical and contemporary racism with a trauma-informed perspective, participants will engage increasing exposure to methods to support individuals that live with inner, interpersonal, or institutional impacts of inflicted racism.

    Objectives

    • Define internalized racism and verbalize its manifestation(s).
    • Assess behaviors and self-defeating thoughts that are congruent with a client's internalized racism.
    • Use one therapeutic technique to bring about healing.
    • Identify ethical considerations to treatment with a framework.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 9/25/2020 1:00 PM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 ethics synchronous interactive
    • 3 regular synchronous interactive

    Skill Level

    Intermediate

    Instructors

    Location

    online
  3. Online Certificate in Integrated Behavioral Health & Primary Care | Adult Track

    The Certificate in Integrated Behavioral Health and Primary Care - Adult Track is designed for clinicians -- such as social workers, nurses, care managers, psychologists, and physicians -- who deliver or plan to deliver integrated health services, and who serve populations often presenting with complex needs in physical health, mental health, and substance use. Participants will gain assessment, intervention, and consultation skills; will learn strategies to apply these skills in the workplace; and will link with a peer distance learning community to practice new skills and discuss ideas.

    Bidirectional Integrated Care
    In this module, participants will build upon their knowledge of integrated care implementation in adult healthcare settings. Topics will include the Chronic Care Model; collaborative care; stepped care; care coordination; and financing integrated health environments. Participants will learn the care coordination standard for integrated primary care and discover new roles in primary care for the behavioral health consultant.

    Assessment in Integrated Care
    Initial and follow-up assessments play a critical role in effective integrated care. This course addresses free-form interviews such as biopsychosocial-spiritual assessment, structured screening tools, and mixed assessment and intervention models such as SBIRT. The strengths, weaknesses, benefits, and limitations of common assessment tools in integrated health environments are reviewed.

    Behavioral Intervention in Integrated Care
    Common elements often form the basis of evidence-based behavioral health interventions. This course teaches and reviews behavioral health intervention skills relevant to everyday clinical practice across disciplines and practice settings. Brief interventions around motivational interviewing, psychoeducation, cognitive restructuring, mindfulness, and values-based behavior change can help promote adaptive health behaviors in support of improved wellness. There is a strong emphasis on feasible brief interventions in a fast-paced clinical context and on adapting interventions to each consumer's unique biopsychosocial, socioeconomic, and cultural context.

    Biomedical Aspects of Integrated Care
    Many presenting medical problems are deeply influenced by health behaviors, and a growing body of evidence suggests that mental health consumers, including those with serious mental illnesses or substance use disorders, are faced with a broad range of physical health disparities. In this module, participants will deepen their understanding of bidirectional integrated care for medical issues such as diabetes and obesity, and behavioral health issues such as substance use disorders and depression. This courses emphasizes the medical sequelae commonly associated with behavioral health diagnoses and psychotropic medications. There are special sections on primary care psychopharmacology and prescription drug abuse.

    Objectives

    • Explain the difference between colocation and integration.
    • Compare and contrast interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary teams.
    • Identify at least three social determinants of health for adult populations.
    • Identify at least five social determinants of health for the pediatric population.
    • State the role of warm handoffs in behavioral health consultation.
    • Describe the findings of the ACEs study.
    • Apply Motivational Enhancement in integrated health settings.
    • Define and apply "reflective listening."
    • Define and recognize "change talk."
    • Identify the five core components of the IMPACT Collaborative Care model and articulate how the model addresses common barriers to behavioral health care.
    • Engage in self-assessment in clinical practice.
    • Explain how provider mindfulness and self-care relate to workforce challenges such as burnout prevention.
    • Describe the assessment of pain in integrated health settings.
    • Identify at least two ethical challenges to integrated health practice.
    • Address/resolve common ethical challenges in integrated health practice.
    • Identify two financing strategies that can facilitate integrated care.
    • Develop skills to hire and train staff in integrated health practice.
    • List the 3 most common psychiatric medications prescribed in primary care and their uses, contraindications, and potential side-effects.
    • State the demographic health disparities facing people living with serious and persistent mental illness.
    • State the role of integrated primary care service delivery in remediating health disparities facing people living with serious and persistent mental illness.
    • List the evidence-based components of Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) for addicted populations.
    • Describe the components of the Infant Mental Health model.
    • Conduct a biopsychosocial-spiritual interview in a fast-paced integrated care setting.
    • List 4 common screening tools and assess their strengths and weaknesses.
    • Identify and normalize developmental considerations in adolescent sexual health.
    • Use Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in integrated health settings.
    • Define and apply "cognitive restructuring."
    • List three features of primary prevention of oral diseases such as dental caries.
    • Identify three risk factors for teen suicide.
    • Explain 3 factors leading to over-prescription of opioid medications.
    • Apply 2 strategies to counteract the over-prescription of opioid medications.
    • Implement an organizational self-assessment for cultural responsiveness.
    • Describe 3 considerations for providing care to the LGBTQ population.
    • Describe strategies for anti-racist practice in integrated health care settings.
    • Outline the four-step model for approaching pain in primary care settings.
    hybrid certificate program

    Sessions

    • 9/30/2020 6:00 PM to 7:00 PM
    • 10/5/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 10/7/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 10/14/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 10/26/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 11/2/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 11/11/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 11/16/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 11/23/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 12/2/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 12/7/2020 6:00 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 12/9/2020 6:00 PM to 7:30 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 ethics synchronous interactive
    • 2 pain management synchronous interactive
    • 17 regular synchronous interactive
    • 14 regular asynchronous online

    Skill Level

    Intermediate

    Location

    online

    Fees

    $1,275.00
  4. Online Certificate in Integrated Behavioral Health & Primary Care | Combined Pediatric & Adult Tracks

    The Certificate in Integrated Behavioral Health and Primary Care - Dual Track is designed for clinicians -- such as social workers, nurses, care managers, psychologists, and physicians -- who are interested in the distinct considerations for providing integrated care to both pediatric and adult populations. Participants will gain assessment, intervention, and consultation skills; will learn strategies to apply these skills in the workplace; and will link with a peer distance learning community to practice new skills and discuss ideas.

    Introduction to Integrated Behavioral Health and Primary Care
    In this module, participants will learn about the nature and implications of integrated care, and will become fluent in the key terms that have come to describe it. Topics will include key public policies affecting the integrated care movement, including the Affordable Care Act; successful models of integrated care; population health management and health disparities; and ethical challenges and opportunities in integrated care. The transition to integrated care will be framed as a paradigm shift from disease-oriented to recovery-oriented service delivery, resulting in new opportunities and challenges, and direct implications for consumers and their families.

    Integrated Health Systems and Implementation
    In this module, participants will obtain knowledge and skills related to the implementation of integrated care services. Implementation of integrated team-based collaborative care presents challenges and opportunities for providers and managers, with significant implications for access to care and patient satisfaction. Topics include basics of integrated health implementation; telepsychiatric consultation; culturally responsive practice; Patient Centered Medical Home recognition; oral health for collaborative care; and provider mindfulness and self-care.

    Foundations of Pediatric Integrated Health Care
    Although "pediatrics" describes the age range from birth through 18 years of age, children develop through a number of distinct developmental, psychological, and social stages. The Pediatric track explores how to address the most common issues of these stages using a pediatric integrated health model of care. Topics include an introduction to the model, the role of the pediatric behavioral health consultant, pediatric social determinants of health, and interventions in the medical setting.

    Pediatric Interventions
    As the health care system is transformed from non-integrated to integrated, many services and interventions can be provided directly to the pediatric population as well as their parents in the medical clinic. Although many clinicians know typical child and adolescent diagnoses from a clinical perspective, this module helps participants develop an integrated understanding of typical topics that may present in the medical setting. Topics include ADHD, pediatric asthma, DD-autism, anxiety, depression, trauma, and adverse childhood experiences.

    Adolescence
    Many adolescents are required to attend at least one physician appointment a year, presenting an annual opportunity to engage them in management of their own health care and in the detection and early intervention of risky behaviors which can have lifelong consequences. Adolescents can be best engaged in self-management when their unique social, developmental, physical and psychological needs are considered. Topics include adolescent-centered medical homes, adolescent sexual health, substance abuse, suicide, eating disorders, and school-based health centers.

    Bidirectional Integrated Care
    In this module, participants will build upon their knowledge of integrated care implementation in adult healthcare settings. Topics will include the Wagner Chronic Care Model; collaborative care; stepped care; care coordination; and billing in integrated health environments. Participants will learn the "care coordination standard" for integrated primary care and discover new roles in primary care for the behavioral health consultant.

    Assessment in Integrated Care
    Initial and follow-up assessments play a critical role in effective integrated care. This course addresses free-form interviews such as biopsychosocial-spiritual assessment, structured screening tools such as the PHQ-9 and the AUDIT-C, and mixed assessment and intervention models such as SBIRT. The strengths, weaknesses, benefits, and limitations of common assessment tools in integrated health environments are reviewed.

    Behavioral Intervention in Integrated Care
    Common elements often form the basis of evidence-based behavioral health interventions. This course teaches and reviews behavioral intervention skills relevant to everyday clinical practice across disciplines and practice settings. Brief interventions around motivational enhancement, psychoeducation, cognitive restructuring, mindfulness, and values-based behavior change can help promote adaptive health behaviors in support of improved wellness. There is a strong emphasis on feasible brief interventions in a fast-paced clinical context and on adapting interventions to each consumer's unique biopsychosocial, socioeconomic, and cultural context.

    Biomedical Aspects of Integrated Care
    Many presenting medical problems are deeply influenced by health behaviors, and a growing body of evidence suggests that mental health consumers, especially those with serious mental illnesses or substance use disorders, are faced with a broad range of physical health disparities. In this module, participants will deepen their understanding of bidirectional integrated care for medical issues such as diabetes and obesity, and behavioral health issues such as substance use disorders and depression. This courses emphasizes the medical sequelae commonly associated with behavioral health diagnoses and psychotropic medications. There are special sections on primary care psychopharmacology and prescription drug abuse.

    Objectives

    • Explain the difference between colocation and integration.
    • Compare and contrast interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary teams.
    • Identify at least three social determinants of health for adult populations.
    • Identify at least five social determinants of health for the pediatric population.
    • State the role of warm handoffs in behavioral health consultation.
    • Identify and describe an example of the Pediatric Integrated Health Care model.
    • Identify requisite skills to serve in the role of behavioral health consultant in pediatric integrated health care.
    • Identify 1-3 impacts of trauma on pediatric brain and social/emotional development.
    • Apply Motivational Enhancement in integrated health settings.
    • Identify two primary causes of pediatric asthma.
    • Identify recommended evidence-based treatment options for ADHD in pediatric primary care.
    • Define and apply "reflective listening."
    • Define and recognize "change talk."
    • Identify the evidence based interventions utilized in Integrated Health Care.
    • Identify the five core components of the IMPACT Collaborative Care model and articulate how the model addresses common barriers to behavioral health care.
    • Engage in self-assessment in clinical practice.
    • Explain how provider mindfulness and self-care relate to workforce challenges such as burnout prevention..
    • Develop resources for psychoeducation of pediatric patients.
    • Educate parents/caregivers on issues of pediatric obesity causes and interventions.
    • Describe the assessment of pain in integrated health settings.
    • Identify at least two ethical challenges to integrated health practice.
    • Address/resolve common ethical challenges in integrated health practice.
    • Identify two financing strategies that can facilitate integrated care.
    • Develop skills to hire and train staff in integrated health practice.
    • List the 3 most common psychiatric medications prescribed in primary care and their uses, contraindications, and potential side-effects.
    • State the demographic health disparities facing people living with serious and persistent mental illness.
    • State the role of integrated primary care service delivery in remediating health disparities facing people living with serious and persistent mental illness.
    • List the evidence-based components of Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) for addicted populations.
    • Describe the components of the Infant Mental Health model.
    • Conduct a biopsychosocial-spiritual interview in a fast-paced integrated care setting.
    • List 4 common screening tools and assess their strengths and weaknesses.
    • Identify and normalize developmental considerations in adolescent sexual health.
    • Use Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in integrated health settings.
    • Define and apply "cognitive restructuring."
    • List three features of primary prevention of oral diseases such as dental caries.
    • Identify three risk factors for teen suicide.
    • Explain 3 factors leading to over-prescription of opioid medications and apply 2 strategies to counteract them.
    • Implement an organizational self-assessment for cultural responsiveness.
    • Identify symptoms of depression that could present in pediatric primary care.
    • Identify appropriate depression medications for the pediatric population.
    • List three common anxieties in children and adolescents.
    • Apply two prevention and/or intervention strategies for pediatric substance abuse.
    • Identify three symptoms of an eating disorder that likely present in healthcare settings.
    • Modify a physical environment to become a developmentally-appropriate and engaging adolescent medical home.
    • Identify a need for further assessment for developmental disabilities.
    • Identify symptoms of autism that are likely to present in pediatric primary care.
    • Demonstrate 3 considerations for providing care to the population.
    • Identify 1-3 strategies to engage adolescents in health care
    • Describe the findings of the ACEs study.
    • Describe how trauma may present in integrated health care settings.
    • Describe strategies for anti-racist practice in integrated health care settings.
    hybrid certificate program

    Sessions

    • 9/30/2020 6:00 PM to 7:00 PM
    • 10/5/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 10/7/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 10/14/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 10/19/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 10/21/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 10/26/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 10/28/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 11/2/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 11/4/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 11/11/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 11/16/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 11/18/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 11/23/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 12/2/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 12/7/2020 6:00 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 12/9/2020 6:00 PM to 7:30 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 ethics live interactive online
    • 2 pain management live interactive online
    • 20 regular asynchronous online
    • 27 regular live interactive online

    Skill Level

    Intermediate

    Location

    online

    Fees

    $1,600.00
  5. Online Certificate in Integrated Behavioral Health & Primary Care | Pediatric Track

    The Certificate in Integrated Behavioral Health and Primary Care - Pediatric Track is designed for direct practitioners -- social workers, nurses, care managers, psychologists and physicians -- who provide services in an integrated health care setting serving children, youth, adolescents and families, or those interested in providing care in a pediatric integrated health care setting. Participants will gain the knowledge and skills associated with providing consultation, screening, assessment, and interventions in primary care settings that serve the distinct developmental and systems of care needs for the pediatric population.

    Introduction to Integrated Behavioral Health and Primary Care
    In this module, participants will learn about the nature and implications of integrated care, and will become fluent in the key terms that have come to describe it. Topics will include key public policies affecting the integrated care movement, including the Affordable Care Act; successful models of integrated care; population health management and health disparities; and ethical challenges and opportunities in integrated care. The transition to integrated care will be framed as a paradigm shift from disease-oriented to recovery-oriented service delivery, resulting in new opportunities and challenges, and direct implications for consumers and their families.

    Integrated Health Systems and Implementation
    In this module, participants will obtain knowledge and skills related to the implementation of integrated care services. Implementation of integrated team-based collaborative care presents challenges and opportunities for providers and managers, with significant implications for access to care and patient satisfaction. Topics include basics of integrated health implementation; telepsychiatric consultation; culturally responsive practice; Patient Centered Medical Home recognition; oral health for collaborative care; and provider mindfulness and self-care.

    Foundations of Pediatric Integrated Health Care
    Although "pediatrics" describes the age range from birth through 18 years of age, children develop through a number of distinct developmental, psychological, and social stages. The Pediatric track explores how to address the most common issues of these stages using a pediatric integrated health model of care. Topics include an introduction to the model, the role of the pediatric behavioral health consultant, pediatric social determinants of health, and interventions in the medical setting.

    Pediatric Interventions
    As the health care system is transformed from non-integrated to integrated, many services and interventions can be provided directly to the pediatric population as well as their parents in the medical clinic. Although many clinicians know typical child and adolescent diagnoses from a clinical perspective, this module helps participants develop an integrated understanding of typical topics that may present in the medical setting. Topics include ADHD, pediatric asthma, DD-autism, anxiety, depression, trauma, and adverse childhood experiences.

    Adolescence
    Many adolescents are required to attend at least one physician appointment a year, presenting an annual opportunity to engage them in management of their own health care and in the detection and early intervention of risky behaviors which can have lifelong consequences. Adolescents can be best engaged in self-management when their unique social, developmental, physical and psychological needs are considered. Topics include adolescent-centered medical homes, adolescent sexual health, substance abuse, suicide, eating disorders, and school-based health centers.

    Objectives

    • Explain the difference between colocation and integration.
    • Compare and contrast interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary teams.
    • Identify at least three social determinants of health for adult populations.
    • Identify at least five social determinants of health for the pediatric population.
    • Identify and describe an example of the Pediatric Integrated Health Care model.
    • Identify requisite skills to serve in the role of behavioral health consultant in pediatric integrated health care.
    • Identify 1-3 impacts of trauma on pediatric brain and social/emotional development.
    • Describe how trauma may presented in integrated health care settings.
    • Identify two primary causes of pediatric asthma.
    • Identify recommended evidence-based treatment options for ADHD in pediatric primary care.
    • Identify the evidence based interventions utilized in Integrated Health Care.
    • Engage in self-assessment in clinical practice.
    • Explain how provider mindfulness and self-care relate to workforce challenges such as burnout prevention.
    • Develop resources for psycho-education of pediatric patients.
    • Educate parents/caregivers on issues of pediatric obesity causes and interventions.
    • Identify at least two ethical challenges to integrated health practice.
    • Address/resolve common ethical challenges in integrated health practice.
    • Identify two financing strategies that can facilitate integrated care.
    • Develop skills to hire and train staff in integrated health practice.
    • List the 3 most common psychiatric medications prescribed in primary care and their uses, contraindications, and potential side-effects.
    • Describe the components of the Infant Mental Health model.
    • Identify and normalize developmental considerations in adolescent sexual health.
    • List three features of primary prevention of oral diseases such as dental caries.
    • Identify three risk factors for teen suicide.
    • Implement an organizational self-assessment for cultural responsiveness.
    • Identify symptoms of depression that could present in pediatric primary care.
    • Identify appropriate depression medications for the pediatric population.
    • List three common anxieties in children and adolescents.
    • Apply two prevention and/or intervention strategies for pediatric substance abuse.
    • Identify three symptoms of an eating disorder that likely present in healthcare settings.
    • Modify a physical environment to become a developmentally-appropriate and engaging adolescent medical home.
    • Identify a need for further assessment for developmental disabilities.
    • Identify symptoms of autism that are likely to present in pediatric primary care.
    • Describe 3 considerations for providing care to the LGBTQ population.
    • Identify 1-3 strategies to engage adolescents in health care.
    • Describe strategies for anti-racist practice in integrated health care settings.
    hybrid certificate program

    Sessions

    • 9/30/2020 6:00 PM to 7:00 PM
    • 10/5/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 10/7/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 10/19/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 10/21/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 10/28/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 11/4/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 11/16/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 11/18/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 12/2/2020 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 12/7/2020 6:00 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 12/9/2020 6:00 PM to 7:30 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 ethics synchronous interactive
    • 20 regular synchronous interactive
    • 14 regular asynchronous online

    Skill Level

    Intermediate

    Location

    online

    Fees

    $1,275.00
  6. Crisis Leadership

    Most people used to think that "crisis leadership" is what "they" do - the CEOs, agency heads, etc. This pandemic has taught us that we all can play an important role in helping ourselves and others through crises. This webinar focuses on practical steps you can take to prepare for and deal with crises when they occur.

    We'll look at examples of positive and poor crisis leadership, examine the critical roles that relationships, and communications play during crises, and discuss the important steps to take during and after crises. We'll include specific ways to support marginalized communities that often suffer the most from crises.

    Objectives

    • Identify at least three key steps to take during each of the three major crisis leadership phases: Preparation, Response, and Recovery/learning.
    • Identify at least two of the key factors in effective crisis communications.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 10/2/2020 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 regular synchronous interactive

    Skill Level

    Intermediate

    Instructor

    • Russell M Linden

    Location

    online
  7. Working with Transitional Age Youth with Behavioral Health Conditions

    Transitional age youth, defined as the transition period from adolescence to young adulthood, represents a developmental periods characterized by, among other things, increased risk taking and vulnerability for behavioral and mental health conditions. Yet the social work theoretical, empirical and practice literature remain underdeveloped, particularly for transitional age youth with behavioral health and mental health conditions. Social work practitioners and researchers alike play an essential role in ameliorating behavioral health conditions among transitional age youth. This course focuses on the state of the science when working with transitional age youth with behavioral health conditions. Students in this course will acquire a general understanding of (1) the prevalence and variations of behavioral health conditions among this overlooked and vulnerable population, (2) etiological factors associated with behavioral health conditions, (3) theoretical frameworks to inform practice with transitional age youth, and (4) best programs and practices when working with transitional age youth.

    Objectives

    • Identify introductory concepts as they relate to philosophy (e.g., epistemology, axiology, ontology).
    • Describe the concept of self-of-the-social worker, and work to minimize biases when working with transitional age youth with behavioral health challenges.
    • Identify the most prominent behavioral health challenges experienced among many transitional age youth.
    • List etiological factors and antecedents that shape behavioral health challenges among transitional age youth.
    • Identify theoretical frameworks to guide practice with transitional age youth with behavioral health challenges.
    • Apply concepts learned to case studies.
    • Identify and discuss professional and/or clinical challenges one may be experiencing.
    • Identify ways in which the characters in the film reflect (or do not reflect) practice with transitional age youth with behavioral health challenges, and apply concepts learned in class to the film's characters.
    • Identify readily available, culturally congruent and developmentally appropriate screening and assessment tools for transitional age youth with behavioral health challenges.
    • Identify efficacious and effective prevention and intervention approaches to practicing with transitional age youth with behavioral health challenges.
    • Apply assessment tools reviewed in the course, with a particular emphasis on culturally specific assessment.
    • Apply an efficacious or effective intervention to a case. Participants will demonstrate a case conceptualization based on the theoretical framework guiding the intervention.
    • Participate in consultation with regard to efficacious and effective interventions that they may be currently using in their practice.
    • Apply efficacious and effective prevention and intervention approaches to practicing with transitional age youth with behavioral health challenges.
    hybrid course

    Sessions

    • 10/10/2020 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
    • 10/17/2020 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 4 regular asynchronous online
    • 10 regular live interactive online

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Instructor

    Location

    online

    Fees

    $265.00
  8. Wonder Woman: Practice and Ethical Considerations

    Please note this course was originally offered as an in-person workshop but has been changed to a webinar due to COVID-19.

    African American women have been identified as experiencing stress as individuals with intersections of non-dominant groups. The workshop will focus on identifying the triple oppression that is experienced and mythical labels created, resilience strategies and ethical considerations. Using the lens of Afrocentrism, we will explore the idea of the "wonder woman," the potential and future of Black women in the United States.

    Objectives

    • Define and provide examples of trauma.
    • Describe the relevance of historical trauma and the poverty, stress and community violence disproportionately observed in marginalized communities for traumatic stress.
    • Identify ethical considerations needed when working with African American women.
    • Identify 2 resilience strategies for individuals impacted by toxic stress.
    • List stereotypes and myths associated with Black women.
    • Identify three ways to modify treatment or practice to be responsive to the needs of marginalized communities.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 10/16/2020 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 ethics synchronous interactive
    • 5 regular synchronous interactive

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Instructors

    Location

    online

    Fees

    $120.00
  9. Alumni Webinar Series | Through the Lens of a Corrections Social Worker

    Note: This course is available for free to U-M SSW alumni as part of our Alumni Webinar Series, which features invited alumni speakers. Please know that non-alumni participants are welcome to register as well!

    Join us to learn about the field of corrections social work, explore what brought about the need for corrections social work, and the importance of quality mental health care within the prison system. Participants will learn about the impact that incarceration has on the individual and the family. We will also examine different programs available within Corrections Mental Health. We will close with a segment on progress that has been made in this field and where the field is headed.

    Objectives

    • Describe the role of social workers working in the prison system.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 10/26/2020 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 regular synchronous interactive

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Instructor

    • Hillary Kolb

    Location

    online
  10. Building Efficient Meetings and Producing Effective Decisions: Achieve Twice as Much in Half the Time

    This session shares results from the Meetings Masters/Decision Maestros Research Project intended to help social workers conduct more effective meetings. The first part of the session highlights practices from Meeting Masters, including the Menu Agenda, and the Agenda Bell. Principles of the Meeting Masters help social workers in the four phases of meeting - preplanning, facilitating/running the meeting itself, processing items for the next meeting, and follow up and implementation of decisions and actions. The second portion reviews several examples of "decision rottenosity" and outlines the process of decision crystallization.

    Objectives

    • Describe challenges in effectiveness that surface in meetings social workers routinely have, such as staff meetings, staff consultations, supervisory meetings, agency board meetings, etc.
    • Describe what occurs during the four phases of a meeting.
    • Develop an agenda for a staff meeting.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 11/6/2020 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 3 regular synchronous interactive

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Instructor

    Location

    online

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