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Outside Classes

Disclaimer

These courses may have been taken by previous Social Work students or may have been identified as of possible interest to Social Work students. Some courses may be restricted and/or not open to Social Work students. There are many other courses not listed offered elsewhere in the university that may be of interest. Interest in courses numbered below 500 should be checked for graduate level status since many are only offered for undergraduate credit. You can check this by contacting the department offering the course or contacting the SSW Registrar.

The information may not be up to date or complete. Please seek additional information from the department where the course is offered and from the instructors of the course. We strongly recommend you discuss your plans to take outside courses with your advisor to make sure they are a good fit for your educational program.

Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory ECON 402

School: Economics
Credits: 4
Prerequisites: ECON 101 and 102, and MATH 115. It is strongly recommended that students take ECON 401 before 402.
Course Description: This course in macroeconomics deals with the determination of broad economic aggregates such as national income, employment, the price level, and the balance of payments in both the short run and the long run. Rigorous analysis is used to understand the forces that determine these economic variables, and how they are affected by public policies. ECON 402 is a prerequisite for many other courses offered in Economics. Concentrators in economics are required to elect this course and are encouraged to complete it early in their concentration program. It is strongly recommended that students take ECON 401 before 402.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001House, Christopher LMon, WedREMOTE12610
003House, Christopher L-REMOTE12611
004House, Christopher LFriREMOTE12612
005House, Christopher L-REMOTE12613
006House, Christopher LFriREMOTE12614
007House, Christopher LFriREMOTE12615
008House, Christopher LFriREMOTE12616
009House, Christopher L-REMOTE12617
010House, Christopher L-REMOTE19060
011House, Christopher L-REMOTE20518
002House, Christopher LFriREMOTE20908
012House, Christopher LFriREMOTE40069

Seminar in Educational Psychology EDBEHAVR 801

School: Education C Behavioral Sciences in Education
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
Course Description: This second semester of the proseminar is a continuation of first semester discussions of current topics in educational psychology with emphasis on classroom learning, motivation, and psychoeducational assessment. A major focus of the course is on research methods and helping students initiate and complete their first-year research projects. (Effective fall 1993, this course counts as a core course in education for program students due to increased focus on the acquisition of a knowledge base in the content areas of the field.)

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Rivas-Drake, DeborahWedREMOTE25920

Current Issues in Educational Studies EDUC 547

School: Education
Credits: 3
Course Description: Explores scholarship and research relevant to current issues in education. Issues vary by term and faculty.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
003Gold, David-REMOTE29627
004Miller, Kevin F-REMOTE32651
005Hearn, Kendra L- 32951
002Beilein, JohnMonREMOTE33203

Financial and Legal Policies for Schools EDUC 555

School: Education
Prerequisites: Graduate Standing or Permission of Instructor
Course Description: Funding for our nation's schools is a critically important educational policy issue and the subject of intense controversy. Indeed, since 1970, nearly every state in the U.S. has confronted one or more legal challenges to its method of allocating funds to public schools. As schools compete for additional resources, and the public resists higher taxes, many questions arise. These include: " How does money matter to educational outcomes? " Under what conditions are states required to allocate more money to public education to improve educational programs? " How do we measure equity in school funding? " How can states reallocate their public education funds to improve equity? " How do policy analysts analyze funding systems to evaluate and improve state school funding formulas? " Should we rely on the local property tax to fund schools? (Is there a better approach?) " Is there a better way for schools to spend the monies they have to improve educational outcomes? Course activities will involve computer-based applications that allow students to design state systems of school funding employing various formulas to increase the equity and adequacy of school funding. Other activities include the use of computer-based applications to assist with developing school budgets that reallocate resources to make the adoption of various whole school reform programs possible. We will also consider the costs and benefits of class size reduction and ways in which resource reallocation might make reductions in class size possible. In addition to a textbook on school finance, course readings will examine current perspectives on the relationship between money and educational outcomes, legal cases that challenge school funding, and evaluations of various state funding proposals.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Helber, Julie Diane-REMOTE25014

Management of Student Affairs and Support Services EDUC 665

School: Education
Credits: 3
Course Description: Examines institutional strategies for organizing, staffing, and funding the extensive array of programs and services designed to meet students' economic, social, developmental, and academic needs. Also focuses on the nature and purpose of student affairs functions and support services and how they can be effectively managed, coordinated, and integrated with the academic purposes of the institution. Intended for master's students with an interest in student affairs and doctoral students attempting to develop an awareness of this important area of institutional functioning.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Perez, Rosemary Jane-REMOTE34842

Special Topics in Education and Psychology EDUC 715

School: Education
Credits: 3
Course Description: Explores topics in education and psychology based on the interests of faculty and students in the program. The topics addressed change each term. Students should consult the office of the Combined Program in Education and Psychology for the current list of offerings each semester.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Rivas-Drake, Deborah-REMOTE40276

K-16 Pathways Policy Seminar EDUC 771

School: Education
Course Description: Many national organizations have defined the K-16 'pipeline' as a set of steps that must be taken by students who aspire to attend college. Typically this includes taking preparatory courses in high school, taking college entrance exams, and applying to college and for student aid. Based in part on studies that have considered correlations among variables related to these steps and college outcomes, some states have revised high school graduation requirements and implemented new encouragement and financial aid programs. In this seminar students will examine the policy agendas of various national advocacy groups, as well as the research on which they base their arguments. The course will also explore more complex policy issues and research related to: educational improvement in elementary, middle and high schools; postsecondary transitions, including mentoring, information services and student aid; and programs that encourage and support student engagement and success in colleges. Students and faculty will also explore how advocacy and research are used in, and influence, formulation and revision of education and finance policies in states and at the federal level. We will explore the current political landscape in education, examine political agendas, consider the research designed to support the underlying rationales and consider ways to better conduct research designed to address policy questions. Students will examine and compare research that has been completed by NCES and other groups to inform policy as well as research that evaluates the effects of policies and reform programs. Interestingly, while many groups espouse policy agendas related to K-16 reform, very few studies actually assess the linkages between these policies (i.e., accountability, standards, graduate requirements, etc.) and the outcomes they are designed to influence The seminar will have five separate segments. During the initial sessions(weeks 1-2) we will focus on cross-cutting issues, as well as the overall course design. The remainder of the course will be approached as four modules covering: national policy agendas (weeks 3-5); research used to rationalize policy agendas (weeks 6-8); specific reform topics in K-12, college transitions, and college success (weeks 9-11); research related to the selected reform topics (weeks 12-14). During the last two modules, students will work on independent projects and share their work with each other. Extensive readings will be available through web linkages and there will be guest speakers will consider research and policy agendas, as well as disciplinary perspectives (from economics, sociology, education and policy studies) on policy analysis and research.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Davis III, Charles Harold Fredrick-REMOTE24033
002Wakefield, Kerri-REMOTE24771
003Davis III, Charles Harold FredrickWedREMOTE34849
004Bastedo, Michael-REMOTE36779

Need Assessment Methods for Behavioral and Educational Health Programs HBEHED 624

School: Health Behavior & Health Education
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
Course Description: This course is for the student who is interested in gaining knowledge and skills about different methodological approaches to doing need assessment for health and human service organizations. The course will focus on the use of both secondary (e.g. agency statistics, census) and primary (survey, forums, informants, focus groups) data. The course emphasizes feasible and inexpensive methods, which can be used by internal evaluators. Students will learn how community epidemiologic surveys (e.g. the National Institute of Mental Health Epidemiologic Catchment Area Program) can be used in conjunction with local secondary data for synthetic estimation of health needs. Need assessment will be conceptualized as a political process as well as a research methodology. Three class sessions will be devoted to an in-depth analysis of a major mental health need assessment conducted by the instructor for the Michigan Department of Corrections. By using this study as a case example, students will be provided with an "inside look" at the social side of need assessment. The case study will also focus on using need information for program development.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Mehdipanah, RoshanakMon, WedREMOTE31034

Communities in Crisis: Public Health and Disasters HBEHED 661

School: Health Behavior & Health Education
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor
Course Description: Disasters are ubiquitous. The frequency of natural and 'man-made' disasters has increased through-out the world during the last two decades. This course will examine how public health can play a vital role in disaster prevention, preparedness, and response. We will examine the topic of disasters from both an analytical and case studies approach. In taking an all-hazards perspective we will examine the impact of disasters on both individuals and communities. In our concern with health outcomes we will explore how public health approaches, can help prevent and mitigate the deleterious impact of extreme events.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J-REMOTE21600

Health Impacts Of Immigration Law Enforcement In The U.S. HBEHED 677

School: Health Behavior & Health Education
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
Course Description: This 3-credit course draws on the social-ecological model to consider the multi-level health impacts of immigration law enforcement on individuals, families and communities; the similarities between immigration enforcement conducted by ICE and law enforcement conducted by police; and how state violence is shaped by anti-Black, -Latino, and -Arab racism. Empirical data, articles, books, and media will be used to catalyze discussion and analysis of how immigration law enforcement impacts mixed-status communities throughout the U.S. Through interactions with those who conducted and lived through law enforcement activities and the advocates and researchers who respond to enforcement, students will better understand the ways in which fear of state violence shapes health and health seeking behaviors throughout the community and contributes to racial health inequities.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Lopez, William Daniel JamesFriREMOTE32189

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