Learning and Teaching During COVID-19

Contact My SSW Intranet Report Sexual Misconduct

Main menu

Outside Classes

Disclaimer

These courses may have been taken by previous Social Work students or may have been identified as of possible interest to Social Work students. Some courses may be restricted and/or not open to Social Work students. There are many other courses not listed offered elsewhere in the university that may be of interest. Interest in courses numbered below 500 should be checked for graduate level status since many are only offered for undergraduate credit. You can check this by contacting the department offering the course or contacting the SSW Registrar.

The information may not be up to date or complete. Please seek additional information from the department where the course is offered and from the instructors of the course. We strongly recommend you discuss your plans to take outside courses with your advisor to make sure they are a good fit for your educational program.

Current Issues in Sociocultural Anthropology ANTHRCUL 558

School: Anthropology - Cultural
Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology; and graduate standing.
Course Description: Critical Theories of Criminalization and Punishment Now more than ever, the phrases “prison industrial complex,” “mass incarceration,” “carceral state” and “abolition” are deployed frequently - evidence of heightened concern about the use of surveillance, policing, and imprisonment as catch-all responses to social, political and economic problems. While encouraging, there is also a danger that in “mass awareness,” analytic specificity may be lost. With an emphasis on ethnographic and anthropological contributions, this course will draw from a range of critical scholarship to examine the numerous processes, institutions, and techniques through which people are criminalized, caged, and controlled. In doing so, the course provides an opportunity to “deep dive” into distinct (and sometimes competing) explanatory frameworks on nature, purpose, and logic that uphold and expand the U.S. carceral regime, as well as its human impacts. Throughout, we will forefront the ways people have resisted and are resisting and consider the political stakes of different ways of understanding, explaining, and addressing the problem.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Hull, MatthewFri210 WH20803
002Roberts, Elizabeth FSMon6050 ISR26326
003Al-Rustom, Hakem AmerMon1185 NQ39647

Impact Studio: Translating Research into Practice BA 670

School: Ross School of Business, Business Administration
Course Description: Develop a toolkit for social innovation that is also desired by top employers across industries. In the interdisciplinary Impact Studio course, BA670, you’ll gain a mindset, a process, and a set of tools and experiences for developing impactful solutions to societal challenges. The course combines the management principles and acumen of business with design thinking, design tools, and interdisciplinary expertise and scholarly insights. We know the pandemic is imposing new demands and constraints and creating new norms and needs for our community. So we asked ourselves – how can we use the knowledge and resources of the University of Michigan and its students to build back better – to reimagine business and the social sector to be more rewarding, just, and democratic? And how might we design for this new reality with resilience and equity in mind?

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Davis, Gerald FMonB0570 BUS29384

Washington DC Residential on Health Care Policy and Politics BE 688

School: Ross School of Business, Business Economics & Public Policy
Credits: 3
Course Description: Although the U.S. has the most market-oriented health care system in the world, government involvement in health care is pervasive. The Federal Medicare program is the single largest purchaser of health care in the U.S., accounting for roughly one-fifth of total health spending. Reimbursement policies adopted by Medicare and other public programs have fundamental effects on the incentives faced by health care providers and suppliers. The Federal governments and the states have long played critical roles in regulating private health insurance markets and supporting private coverage with large tax subsidies. The passage of the Affordable Care Act in 2010 significantly increases the involvement of the government in health insurance markets. Federal agencies such as the Food and Drug Administration also shape the development and diffusion of health technology. In light of the extensive and important role that government plays in health care, it is important for students who are interested in a career in health care to understand key health care policy issues, as well as the institutional and political context in which these policies are crafted. The goal of this course is to provide a deep and nuanced introduction to these issues.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Buchmueller, Tom- 27508

Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory ECON 402

School: Economics
Credits: 4
Prerequisites: ECON 101 and 102, and MATH 115. It is strongly recommended that students take ECON 401 before 402.
Course Description: This course in macroeconomics deals with the determination of broad economic aggregates such as national income, employment, the price level, and the balance of payments in both the short run and the long run. Rigorous analysis is used to understand the forces that determine these economic variables, and how they are affected by public policies. ECON 402 is a prerequisite for many other courses offered in Economics. Concentrators in economics are required to elect this course and are encouraged to complete it early in their concentration program. It is strongly recommended that students take ECON 401 before 402.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Cravino, JavierMon, Wed140 LORCH11219
003Cravino, Javier-2306 MH11220
004Cravino, JavierFri268 WEISER11221
005Cravino, Javier-2114 MLB11222
006Cravino, JavierFri1469 MH11223
007Cravino, JavierFri1372 EH11224
008Cravino, JavierFri1401 MH11225
009Cravino, Javier-2114 MLB11226
010Cravino, Javier-1469 MH17663
011Cravino, Javier-G026 TISCH19120
002Cravino, JavierFri1339 MH19509

Seminar in Educational Psychology EDBEHAVR 800

School: Education C Behavioral Sciences in Education
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
Course Description: This first semester of the proseminar encourages discussions of current topics in educational psychology with emphasis on classroom learning, motivation, and psychoeducational assessment. Invited speakers from education, psychology, and related departments present on their current research. A major focus of the course is on research methods and helping students initiate and complete their first-year research projects.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Cortina, Kai Schnabel-2225 SEB36510

Current Issues in Educational Studies EDUC 547

School: Education
Credits: 3
Course Description: Explores scholarship and research relevant to current issues in education. Issues vary by term and faculty.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Kubi, GabrielleWed2328 SEB23760
004Miller, Kevin F-2229 SEB31208
005Hearn, Kendra L-ARR31508

Management of Student Affairs and Support Services EDUC 665

School: Education
Credits: 3
Course Description: Examines institutional strategies for organizing, staffing, and funding the extensive array of programs and services designed to meet students' economic, social, developmental, and academic needs. Also focuses on the nature and purpose of student affairs functions and support services and how they can be effectively managed, coordinated, and integrated with the academic purposes of the institution. Intended for master's students with an interest in student affairs and doctoral students attempting to develop an awareness of this important area of institutional functioning.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Perez, Rosemary Jane-2229 SEB36418

K-16 Pathways Policy Seminar EDUC 771

School: Education
Course Description: Many national organizations have defined the K-16 'pipeline' as a set of steps that must be taken by students who aspire to attend college. Typically this includes taking preparatory courses in high school, taking college entrance exams, and applying to college and for student aid. Based in part on studies that have considered correlations among variables related to these steps and college outcomes, some states have revised high school graduation requirements and implemented new encouragement and financial aid programs. In this seminar students will examine the policy agendas of various national advocacy groups, as well as the research on which they base their arguments. The course will also explore more complex policy issues and research related to: educational improvement in elementary, middle and high schools; postsecondary transitions, including mentoring, information services and student aid; and programs that encourage and support student engagement and success in colleges. Students and faculty will also explore how advocacy and research are used in, and influence, formulation and revision of education and finance policies in states and at the federal level. We will explore the current political landscape in education, examine political agendas, consider the research designed to support the underlying rationales and consider ways to better conduct research designed to address policy questions. Students will examine and compare research that has been completed by NCES and other groups to inform policy as well as research that evaluates the effects of policies and reform programs. Interestingly, while many groups espouse policy agendas related to K-16 reform, very few studies actually assess the linkages between these policies (i.e., accountability, standards, graduate requirements, etc.) and the outcomes they are designed to influence The seminar will have five separate segments. During the initial sessions(weeks 1-2) we will focus on cross-cutting issues, as well as the overall course design. The remainder of the course will be approached as four modules covering: national policy agendas (weeks 3-5); research used to rationalize policy agendas (weeks 6-8); specific reform topics in K-12, college transitions, and college success (weeks 9-11); research related to the selected reform topics (weeks 12-14). During the last two modules, students will work on independent projects and share their work with each other. Extensive readings will be available through web linkages and there will be guest speakers will consider research and policy agendas, as well as disciplinary perspectives (from economics, sociology, education and policy studies) on policy analysis and research.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
002Gupta, NikhilWed2346 SEB23361
003Bowman, PhillipWed2340 SEB28202

Health Impacts Of Immigration Law Enforcement In The U.S. HBEHED 677

School: Health Behavior & Health Education
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
Course Description: This 3-credit course draws on the social-ecological model to consider the multi-level health impacts of immigration law enforcement on individuals, families and communities; the similarities between immigration enforcement conducted by ICE and law enforcement conducted by police; and how state violence is shaped by anti-Black, -Latino, and -Arab racism. Empirical data, articles, books, and media will be used to catalyze discussion and analysis of how immigration law enforcement impacts mixed-status communities throughout the U.S. Through interactions with those who conducted and lived through law enforcement activities and the advocates and researchers who respond to enforcement, students will better understand the ways in which fear of state violence shapes health and health seeking behaviors throughout the community and contributes to racial health inequities.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Lopez, WilliamFri3755 SPH130746

Special Topic HBHE Education HBEHED 710

School: Health Behavior & Health Education
Credits: 1-6
Course Description: Master's level seminar designed to provide an extensive review of a number of substantive and methods and skill areas in health behavior and health education. Readings, discussion and assignments are organized around issues of mutual interest to faculty and students. Reviews and reports on topics require in the areas selected. May be elected more than once.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Amico, K Rivet-G020 SPH236051
002Chatters She-Her, Linda-REMOTE36052
003Kostanecki, EileenMonREMOTE36053

Contact Us Press escape to close