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These courses may have been taken by previous Social Work students or may have been identified as of possible interest to Social Work students. Some courses may be restricted and/or not open to Social Work students. There are many other courses not listed offered elsewhere in the university that may be of interest. Interest in courses numbered below 500 should be checked for graduate level status since many are only offered for undergraduate credit. You can check this by contacting the department offering the course or contacting the SSW Registrar.

The information may not be up to date or complete. Please seek additional information from the department where the course is offered and from the instructors of the course. We strongly recommend you discuss your plans to take outside courses with your advisor to make sure they are a good fit for your educational program.

Washington DC Residential on Health Care Policy and Politics BE 688

School: Ross School of Business, Business Economics & Public Policy
Credits: 3
Course Description: Although the U.S. has the most market-oriented health care system in the world, government involvement in health care is pervasive. The Federal Medicare program is the single largest purchaser of health care in the U.S., accounting for roughly one-fifth of total health spending. Reimbursement policies adopted by Medicare and other public programs have fundamental effects on the incentives faced by health care providers and suppliers. The Federal governments and the states have long played critical roles in regulating private health insurance markets and supporting private coverage with large tax subsidies. The passage of the Affordable Care Act in 2010 significantly increases the involvement of the government in health insurance markets. Federal agencies such as the Food and Drug Administration also shape the development and diffusion of health technology. In light of the extensive and important role that government plays in health care, it is important for students who are interested in a career in health care to understand key health care policy issues, as well as the institutional and political context in which these policies are crafted. The goal of this course is to provide a deep and nuanced introduction to these issues.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Buchmueller, Thomas C- 31758

Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory ECON 402

School: Economics
Credits: 4
Prerequesites: ECON 101 and 102, and MATH 115. It is strongly recommended that students take ECON 401 before 402.
Course Description: This course in macroeconomics deals with the determination of broad economic aggregates such as national income, employment, the price level, and the balance of payments in both the short run and the long run. Rigorous analysis is used to understand the forces that determine these economic variables, and how they are affected by public policies. ECON 402 is a prerequisite for many other courses offered in Economics. Concentrators in economics are required to elect this course and are encouraged to complete it early in their concentration program. It is strongly recommended that students take ECON 401 before 402.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Dudek, Maciej KonradMon, Wed140 LORCH11341
003Dudek, Maciej Konrad-1230 WEILL11342
004Dudek, Maciej KonradFriB856 EQ11343
005Dudek, Maciej Konrad-B852 EQ11344
006Dudek, Maciej KonradFriB852 EQ11345
007Dudek, Maciej KonradFri3333 MH11346
008Dudek, Maciej KonradFri1105 NQ11347
009Dudek, Maciej Konrad-373 LORCH11348
010Dudek, Maciej Konrad-142 LORCH18130
011Dudek, Maciej Konrad-B137 MLB19726
002Dudek, Maciej KonradWed3304 MLB20148

Seminar in Educational Psychology EDBEHAVR 801

School: Education C Behavioral Sciences in Education
Credits: 3
Prerequesites: Permission of instructor
Course Description: This second semester of the proseminar is a continuation of first semester discussions of current topics in educational psychology with emphasis on classroom learning, motivation, and psychoeducational assessment. A major focus of the course is on research methods and helping students initiate and complete their first-year research projects. (Effective fall 1993, this course counts as a core course in education for program students due to increased focus on the acquisition of a knowledge base in the content areas of the field.)

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Chavous, Tabbye Maria- 26316

Current Issues in Educational Studies EDUC 547

School: Education
Credits: 3
Course Description: Explores scholarship and research relevant to current issues in education. Issues vary by term and faculty.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Mathews, Channing-2229 SEB25196
002Jacobs, James B-2310 SEB26309
003Gold, David Phillip-3440 MH33573

Financial and Legal Policies for Schools EDUC 555

School: Education
Prerequesites: Graduate Standing or Permission of Instructor
Course Description: Funding for our nation's schools is a critically important educational policy issue and the subject of intense controversy. Indeed, since 1970, nearly every state in the U.S. has confronted one or more legal challenges to its method of allocating funds to public schools. As schools compete for additional resources, and the public resists higher taxes, many questions arise. These include: " How does money matter to educational outcomes? " Under what conditions are states required to allocate more money to public education to improve educational programs? " How do we measure equity in school funding? " How can states reallocate their public education funds to improve equity? " How do policy analysts analyze funding systems to evaluate and improve state school funding formulas? " Should we rely on the local property tax to fund schools? (Is there a better approach?) " Is there a better way for schools to spend the monies they have to improve educational outcomes? Course activities will involve computer-based applications that allow students to design state systems of school funding employing various formulas to increase the equity and adequacy of school funding. Other activities include the use of computer-based applications to assist with developing school budgets that reallocate resources to make the adoption of various whole school reform programs possible. We will also consider the costs and benefits of class size reduction and ways in which resource reallocation might make reductions in class size possible. In addition to a textbook on school finance, course readings will examine current perspectives on the relationship between money and educational outcomes, legal cases that challenge school funding, and evaluations of various state funding proposals.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Helber, Julie Diane-2229 SEB24962

Learning and Development in Higher Education EDUC 662

School: Education
Credits: 3
Course Description: Examines patterns of intellectual, social and emotional development and change among older adolescents and adults; reviews and research on learning and development among college and university students.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001King, Patricia M-2328 SEB31103

Special Topics in Education and Psychology EDUC 715

School: Education
Credits: 3
Course Description: Explores topics in education and psychology based on the interests of faculty and students in the program. The topics addressed change each term. Students should consult the office of the Combined Program in Education and Psychology for the current list of offerings each semester.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Miller, Kevin F- 26501

K-16 Pathways Policy Seminar EDUC 771

School: Education
Course Description: Many national organizations have defined the K-16 'pipeline' as a set of steps that must be taken by students who aspire to attend college. Typically this includes taking preparatory courses in high school, taking college entrance exams, and applying to college and for student aid. Based in part on studies that have considered correlations among variables related to these steps and college outcomes, some states have revised high school graduation requirements and implemented new encouragement and financial aid programs. In this seminar students will examine the policy agendas of various national advocacy groups, as well as the research on which they base their arguments. The course will also explore more complex policy issues and research related to: educational improvement in elementary, middle and high schools; postsecondary transitions, including mentoring, information services and student aid; and programs that encourage and support student engagement and success in colleges. Students and faculty will also explore how advocacy and research are used in, and influence, formulation and revision of education and finance policies in states and at the federal level. We will explore the current political landscape in education, examine political agendas, consider the research designed to support the underlying rationales and consider ways to better conduct research designed to address policy questions. Students will examine and compare research that has been completed by NCES and other groups to inform policy as well as research that evaluates the effects of policies and reform programs. Interestingly, while many groups espouse policy agendas related to K-16 reform, very few studies actually assess the linkages between these policies (i.e., accountability, standards, graduate requirements, etc.) and the outcomes they are designed to influence The seminar will have five separate segments. During the initial sessions(weeks 1-2) we will focus on cross-cutting issues, as well as the overall course design. The remainder of the course will be approached as four modules covering: national policy agendas (weeks 3-5); research used to rationalize policy agendas (weeks 6-8); specific reform topics in K-12, college transitions, and college success (weeks 9-11); research related to the selected reform topics (weeks 12-14). During the last two modules, students will work on independent projects and share their work with each other. Extensive readings will be available through web linkages and there will be guest speakers will consider research and policy agendas, as well as disciplinary perspectives (from economics, sociology, education and policy studies) on policy analysis and research.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Bowman, Phillip JessWed2310 SEB23699
002Wakefield, KerriMon2218 SEB24611
TBDTBDSat4212 SEB33584

Communities in Crisis: Public Health and Disasters HBEHED 661

School: Health Behavior & Health Education
Credits: 3
Prerequesites: Permission of Instructor
Course Description: Disasters are ubiquitous. The frequency of natural and 'man-made' disasters has increased through-out the world during the last two decades. This course will examine how public health can play a vital role in disaster prevention, preparedness, and response. We will examine the topic of disasters from both an analytical and case studies approach. In taking an all-hazards perspective we will examine the impact of disasters on both individuals and communities. In our concern with health outcomes we will explore how public health approaches, can help prevent and mitigate the deleterious impact of extreme events.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J-3755 SPH120905

Environmental Health HBEHED 690

School: Health Behavior & Health Education
Credits: 3
Course Description: Environmental Health Promotion --- This class applied health education principles towards understanding and intervening on different environmental hazards. The course will review various kinds of environmental issues, including biochemical toxins, physical hazards, and psychosocial stressors. Students will learn about select datasouces from which they may obtain environmental health information. The course will examine the literature on risk perception, risk communication, ethics, and environmental health education and explore how health educators can use resource and conceptual tools to help ameliorate environmental concerns. This course will also examine case studies from individual communities as focal points for discussion. Based on these case studies, students will explore whether extant theories and approaches can help protect vulnerable populations, insure environmental justice, and reduce health disparities.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Schulz, Amy JoFri2750 SPH131899

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