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These courses may have been taken by previous Social Work students or may have been identified as of possible interest to Social Work students. Some courses may be restricted and/or not open to Social Work students. There are many other courses not listed offered elsewhere in the university that may be of interest. Interest in courses numbered below 500 should be checked for graduate level status since many are only offered for undergraduate credit. You can check this by contacting the department offering the course or contacting the SSW Registrar.

The information may not be up to date or complete. Please seek additional information from the department where the course is offered and from the instructors of the course. We strongly recommend you discuss your plans to take outside courses with your advisor to make sure they are a good fit for your educational program.

Made in Detroit AMCULT 433

School: American Culture (Graduate)
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Prior coursework in art history, U.S. history, American culture, or urban studies
Course Description: The embodiment of "Modern Times" was the assembly line, and Detroit, dubbed "the capital of the Twentieth Century" played an important symbolic role for modern artists. Yet while Detroit's industry has been depicted as an abstract emblem of twentieth century progress, Detroit itself has a complicated labor, racial, and political history that makes the city and its art different from that of any other place. This course will examine how Detroit has been depicted in modern art, and the role that the arts and architecture have played in the city from the 1880's to the present. We will consider both works produced in Detroit that defined technology and urban culture for the world, and those that have particular local histories from the efforts to bring "civilization" to the motor city via art collecting and symphony orchestras to the creation of the Motown sound; from the sleek Ford factories that heralded modern architecture in America to the artificial past that Henry Ford assembled at Greenfield Village, from the heroic worker figures of Diego Rivera's murals to the controversies surrounding the Joe Louis monument and the Heidelberg Project.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Zurier, RebeccaMon, Wed210 TAP30007

Approaches to American Culture AMCULT 697

School: American Culture (Graduate)
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
Course Description: This course concentrates on a variety of ways of studying American society and its culture and provides an introduction to the conceptual frameworks and intellectual history of American Studies.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Kelley, Mary CWed3505 HH25897

Current Issues in Sociocultural Anthropology ANTHRCUL 558

School: Anthropology - Cultural
Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology; and graduate standing.
Course Description: Critical Theories of Criminalization and Punishment Now more than ever, the phrases “prison industrial complex,” “mass incarceration,” “carceral state” and “abolition” are deployed frequently - evidence of heightened concern about the use of surveillance, policing, and imprisonment as catch-all responses to social, political and economic problems. While encouraging, there is also a danger that in “mass awareness,” analytic specificity may be lost. With an emphasis on ethnographic and anthropological contributions, this course will draw from a range of critical scholarship to examine the numerous processes, institutions, and techniques through which people are criminalized, caged, and controlled. In doing so, the course provides an opportunity to “deep dive” into distinct (and sometimes competing) explanatory frameworks on nature, purpose, and logic that uphold and expand the U.S. carceral regime, as well as its human impacts. Throughout, we will forefront the ways people have resisted and are resisting and consider the political stakes of different ways of understanding, explaining, and addressing the problem.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Burch, Melissa-2454 MH21346
002Keane, WebbWed210 WH32888

A Cross-Disciplinary Perspective on Healthcare Delivery in Low- and Middle-Income Countries BA 620

School: Ross School of Business, Business Administration
Credits: 1.5
Course Description: A Cross-Disciplinary Perspective on Healthcare Delivery in Low- and Middle-Income Countries --- Healthcare delivery in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is influenced by a number of factors such as provider expertise, patient trust, access, financing, medication/treatment availability, policies, and evolving technologies. Some components vary from culture to culture, while others remain constant. Improvements in healthcare delivery in these countries will rely on a good understanding of the various disciplinary approaches to care and how they can vary between cultures. This course is designed to introduce students to the perspectives and challenges faced by people in disciplines and cultures that differ from their own and think critically about the effect of that understanding on their own discipline's engagement in healthcare delivery in LMICs.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Clyde, Paul SWedB0570 BUS30786
451Clyde, Paul SWedB0570 BUS30787
801Clyde, Paul SWedB0570 BUS30846

Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory ECON 402

School: Economics
Credits: 4
Prerequisites: ECON 101 and 102, and MATH 115. It is strongly recommended that students take ECON 401 before 402.
Course Description: This course in macroeconomics deals with the determination of broad economic aggregates such as national income, employment, the price level, and the balance of payments in both the short run and the long run. Rigorous analysis is used to understand the forces that determine these economic variables, and how they are affected by public policies. ECON 402 is a prerequisite for many other courses offered in Economics. Concentrators in economics are required to elect this course and are encouraged to complete it early in their concentration program. It is strongly recommended that students take ECON 401 before 402.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001 -140 LORCH11062
012Cho, EdwardFri335 WH11063
002Cho, Edward-335 WH11064
004Cho, EdwardFri268 WEISER11065
005Cho, EdwardFri268 WEISER11066
006Cho, EdwardFri1028 DANA11067
007Cho, EdwardFri1339 MH11068
008Cho, EdwardFri1040 DANA11069
009Cho, Edward-1175 NQ18683
010Cho, EdwardFri296 WEISER23981
011Cho, EdwardFri1105 NQ28619
003Cho, Edward-1028 DANA29452

Government Expenditures ECON 683

School: Economics
Credits: 3
Course Description: Emphasizes theory and evidence on government expenditure policy. Topics covered include the theory of public goods, state and local public goods, welfare economics and income distribution, political economy and voting mechanisms, and the design and evaluation of social insurance programs.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Craig, Ashley CooperMon, Wed171 LORCH16192

Seminar in Educational Psychology EDBEHAVR 800

School: Education C Behavioral Sciences in Education
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
Course Description: This first semester of the proseminar encourages discussions of current topics in educational psychology with emphasis on classroom learning, motivation, and psychoeducational assessment. Invited speakers from education, psychology, and related departments present on their current research. A major focus of the course is on research methods and helping students initiate and complete their first-year research projects.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Ryan, Allison MurphyWed2346 SEB19470

Current Issues in Educational Studies EDUC 547

School: Education
Credits: 3
Course Description: Explores scholarship and research relevant to current issues in education. Issues vary by term and faculty.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Jones, DeniseWed2241 SEB27297
003Miller, Kevin F- 29295
004Hearn, Kendra L- 31064
002Bain, BobWed2218 SEB34555
005Thomas, Ebony Elizabeth-2310 SEB38219

Introduction to Higher Education EDUC 561

School: Education
Credits: 3.0
Course Description: Provides an overview of the postsecondary education system in the United States; examines the major features of this system and explores its effects; explores effects of various professional and disciplinary perspectives on the study of postsecondary education viewed as an interdisciplinary field.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Rodriguez, Awilda- 10231
002Sutkus, Janel- 31861

Issues in Education Policy EDUC 628

School: Education
Credits: 3
Course Description: Students will acquaint themselves with the central problems of making, implementing and doing research on education policy; with the governmental systems in which policy is made and executed and with the influences on those systems; and with some of the important research on these matters and leading problems in that research.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Goldin, Simona-REMOTE34670

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