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  1. Social Work with Military Service Members, Veterans and their Families

    This course was designed to increase the knowledge base and competency level of social workers who plan to work with (or are interested in) military service members, veterans and their families. This will be accomplished by introducing participants to basic military background and structure, the common problem-areas experienced by this community, and the diverse sub-groups that exist within this unique population.

    The content covered in this course will include subject areas such as military culture, trauma, life after service (transition), problems/issues faced by family members and the study of specific populations within the service such as women, other minorities, and the LGBT population. In addition to improving the cultural competency in the areas listed above, students will also be exposed to the diverse and unique challenges faced by the veterans of different war eras (WWII, Korea, Vietnam, Gulf War and current conflicts). Time will also be spent discussing the kinds of clinical skills that are important for social workers to possess when working with this population.

    Objectives

    • Demonstrate improved cultural competency in the areas of military culture, structure and organization.
    • Identify recent U.S. conflicts and the their cultural implications for civilian service providers.
    • Assess the unique challenges associated with the various conflict-era veteran groups.
    • Demonstrate improved cultural competency in the area of the LGBT community in the Military and Veteran populations.
    • Demonstrate improved cultural competency in the area of Women in the Military and Veteran populations.
    • Demonstrate improved cultural competency in the area of other minority groups in the Military and Veteran populations.
    • Identify the specific cultural competencies that are needed when working with military service members and veterans with histories of trauma.
    • Identify factors that influence the stigma towards receiving mental health treatment in the military and veteran communities.
    • Demonstrate improved clinical competencies in the areas of assessment and treatment with the military and veteran community.
    • Demonstrate improved recognition of military deployment cycles and the challenges of family reintegration.
    • Identify and improve familiarity of available community resources and support networks.
    • Identify and improve familiarity of available community resources for families.
    • Identify the various barriers and available solutions that impact the Veteran population.
    • Demonstrate improved understanding of the full scope of practice for social workers, working with service members, veterans and their families.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 9/12/2019 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 9/16/2019 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 9/26/2019 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 10/3/2019 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 10/10/2019 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 15 regular in-person

    Instructor

    • Joseph Cafferty

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
  2. Theory and Practice of Infant Mental Health

    This introductory course will examine the principles of Infant Mental Health intervention with families of infants and young children. Using attachment theory as a foundation, we will examine best practices in supporting early developing relationships between infants and young children and their caregivers. Special attention will be given to understanding the processes through which practitioners can promote infant well-being and expand parenting capacity to nurture and protect their children.

    Objectives

    • Describe the history of social science with regard to past theories of child development and how they influence cultural norms of parenting
    • Describe theories of the relationship between early parent-infant interaction and subsequent development
    • Identify key features of four attachment templates of babies
    • Identify key features of four states of mind regarding attachment of parents
    • Identify consequences of failures or disruptions of the attachment process for both parent and child
    • Identify five core parental discourse markers that suggest increased risk for infant disorganized attachment
    • Identify five core parental behaviors that create increased risk for infant disorganized attachment
    • Identify strategies for effective intervention to strengthen early attachment
    • Apply a therapeutic response based on awareness of role of mirror neurons in communication
    • Identify transference and countertransference issues pertinent to infant mental health work
    • Describe how the clinician's own history can impact intervention
    • Describe concept of Parental Reflective Functioning
    • Describe how to listen for Reflective Functioning
    • Develop skills to increase Parental Reflective Functioning Identify the role of parallel process in increasing Parental Reflective Functioning Identify ways to support and maintain Reflective Functioning as the therapist
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 9/14/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
    • 9/21/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 14 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    TBD
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
  3. Alumni Webinar Series: Affirming Black Racial Identity in Urban Schools

    Dr. Cass' session will explore the historical and contemporary underpinnings of African-centered education in places where young people are most frequently found: schools. This will also examine the application of racial affirming concepts, approaches, and strategies in the formation of an urban African-centered high school. The session is necessary for school-based practitioners engaging Black youth in the learning environment with a focus on urban adolescents.

    Note: This webinar is free for U-M SSW alumni.

    Objectives

    • Identify racially-affirming methods and approaches to support the academic and social wellbeing of Black youth in schools, as well as, analyze a case study of a forthcoming African-centered high school.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 9/19/2019 12:00pm to 1:00pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 regular synchronous interactive

    Location

    online
    online
  4. Attachment Theory and Clinical Practice through the Life Span

    Understanding the implications of early relationships on adult functioning can inform adult psychotherapy in ways that can assist clients in their capacity to form and maintain healthy relationships. Using attachment theory as the foundation, this course will address relationship-based intervention in interpersonal practice with adults.

    Objectives

    • Describe the theoretical construct of attachment patterns.
    • Identify key parenting behaviors that lead to security of attachment.
    • Describe secure base behavior.
    • Describe ambivalent attachment.
    • Describe avoidant attachment.
    • Describe disorganized attachment.
    • Compare the clinical correlates of adolescent and adult attachment organization.
    • Describe adult states of mind regarding attachment.
    • Identify the links between adult states of mind and child outcomes.
    • Describe the specific processes associated with disorganized attachment.
    • Describe how attachment to informs clinical thinking and intervention.
    • Describe the role of clinician state of mind during the therapeutic process.
    • Identify the role of mirror neurons in emotional communication.
    • Articulate the role of transference and countertransference in treatment.
    • Describe the role of parallel process in treatment. Articulate two different forms of parallel process in treatment.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 9/28/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
    • 10/5/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 15 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
  5. Social Work Practice in the Era of Fake News

    The term "post-truth," the Oxford Dictionaries 2016 Word of the Year, reflects an era where everyone is a few clicks away from information that supports any goal, belief, or outcome desired whether or not that information is factual. Evaluating information and recognizing "fake news" is a critical skill for everyone. For social workers, advocates, policy makers, and others responsible for human well-being, it's essential to find reliable data and other evidence to promote best practice and avoid the dangers of inaccurate information. Skill in locating and evaluating information can also help a practitioner work with clients and others who bring incorrect information into an interaction. This mini-course will address the following:

    - Understanding the phenomenon of fake news in the information landscape
    - Building strategies for spotting fake news
    - Addressing best approaches to locate "real" news
    - Learning how to fact-check data and statistics
    - Ways in which information is organized, structured, and delivered to support the dominant social narratives in the U.S.

    Objectives

    • Describe how people acquire and retain information.
    • Define terminology used in the course.
    • Describe strategies for locating credible sources.
    • To continue building skills and strategies for locating credible sources at a more nuanced level.
    • Describe the origins of "fake news" and how it enters our awareness.
    • Critique information that appears as data.
    • Critique visual displays of information.
    • Describe how algorithms work and where they can become problematic.
    • Describe information marketing and surveillance capitalism.
    • Describe dominant social narratives and how privilege plays into our understanding of and access to information.
    • Analyze and evaluate how privilege and dominant social narratives affect the news we see and don't see.
    • Assess the role of publishers, web builders, and other producers of information in the creation of our news environment.
    • Outline strategies for communicating respectfully against fake news.
    • Describe strategies for challenging misinformation.
    • Apply communication strategies to specific types of interactions and how to work within those scenarios (e.g. talking with a client, funder, supervisor, politician).
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 10/2/2019 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 10/9/2019 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 10/16/2019 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 10/23/2019 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 10/30/2019 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 15 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
  6. Higher Education Supports for Youth with Experience in Foster Care

    This session is focused how to support and facilitate academic success within higher education for students who have experienced foster care. Nationally about 50% of children who experience foster care will graduate high school and about 2-4% of those will earn a four year degree. This presentation will give an overview of educational outcomes as well as the barriers and unique needs of students who have experienced foster as well as strategies, tools, and resources that DHHS foster care workers and other supportive adults can use in their practice when working with young people navigating educational options.

    Objectives

    • Describe educational outcomes for foster youth.
    • Identify barriers for educational success for foster youth.
    • Identify resources and strategies to support children in foster care to increase educational success.
    face-to-face workshop/seminar

    Sessions

    • 10/3/2019 9:00 AM to 12:15 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 3 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 S University
    Ann Arbor
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: 1840 (ECC)
  7. Working with Couples in Therapy

    This mini-course is designed to familiarize students with the current theories of couple therapy. Selected empirically supported models utilized in couple therapy will be examined The course also looks at some of the key issues and challenges faced by therapists who provide couple therapy. This mini-course will be skill based and focus on helping students to learn effective approaches to working with couples in therapy.

    Objectives

    • Identify current theories of couples therapy.
    • Describe empirically supported models (especially for depression and other mental disorders) utilized in couple therapy in terms of their concepts of health assumptions, goals, assessment features, diversity factors and interventions.
    • Identify key issues and challenges faced by therapists who provide couple therapy.
    • Engage in skill-based activities to promote application of couple therapy interventions.
    • Describe the basics of a couple evaluation so that the participant will feel more comfortable meeting with a couple in a variety of settings.
    • Identify the indictions and contraindications for doing couple therapy.
    • Identify at least two couples therapy models and learn how and when to integrate models.
    • Describe how to decide which model is the most appropriate for the clinical situation.
    • Describe the role of neutrality and skills that work to foster neutrality.
    • Describe the role of class, ethnicity and race in evaluating and treating couples.
    • Identify treatment approaches for working with same-sex couples and gender.
    • Describe prevention models and role of psychoeducation.
    • Describe how to handle high-conflict couples.
    • Describe special needs of couples who are in a "step-family."
    • Describe the role of therapist and how to address countertransference and bias in treatment.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 10/3/2019 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 10/10/2019 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 10/17/2019 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 10/24/2019 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 10/31/2019 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 15 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    University of Michigan School of Social Work
    1080 South University Ave.
    TBD
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
  8. Collaborating Across Boundaries

    This webinar, taught by Russ Linden, describes the practice of collaboration through the lens of two case examples in which collaborative leaders overcame enormous barriers in pursuit of their shared goals.

    We discuss the nature of collaborative leadership, six key factors that promote collaboration, and how to address many collaboration hurdles.

    Objectives

    • Identify 5 characteristics of effective collaborative leaders.
    • Describe 6 key factors that support successful collaboration.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 10/4/2019 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 regular live interactive online

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
  9. Immigration Enforcement, Human Rights, and Social Justice

    This mini-course focuses on the real community and personal impact of a public policy with sweeping national controversy, many deaths, and significant questions about social justice, racial discrimination, and even intent in the constitution. Because it is a mini-course, rather than a full course, this course will concentrate on one aspect of immigration policy? undocumented immigrants and the public policy strategy of enforcement for undocumented immigrants at the border and in the interior of the country. Along with discussion of the policies and practices of enforcement, we will bring local enforcement activities to the table and examine their impact on people, families, and Michigan communities. The discussion will have a global, national, state, and a local component. Students in this course will acquire the skills to critically analyze this aspect of immigration policy and its controversies. and about community and organization responses and activism.

    Objectives

    • Identify and assess the language, intent, and extent of enforcement policies, the strategies and tactics of enforcement, and government entities related to enforcement.
    • Analyze the economic, social, and health impact of enforcement on individuals, families and communities.
    • Apply immigrant rights information effectively in community organizing and other activism.
    • Describe the history, causes, and consequences of undocumented immigration.
    • Identify personal attitudes and knowledge regarding immigrant populations and immigration issues.
    • Outline the history of immigration policy.
    • Describe the impact of increased immigration enforcement on the local Latino immigrant community, including the implications of being within 100 miles of the northern US border.
    • Identify implications of the largest immigration raid in the country.
    • Describe controversies related to the development of the Department of Homeland Security.
    • Explain the facts and controversies related to increased border enforcement at the southern border, toward awareness.
    • Identify social work and advocacy interventions at the southern border to protect migrant populations.
    • Engage with people who have been affected by increased immigration enforcement.
    • Describe recent (last 10 years) immigration policy reform efforts.
    • Identify core principles of humane immigration reform. Identify examples of advocacy efforts to create positive changes in local policies affecting undocumented immigrant populations, i.e. local police, city resolutions, tuition equality, etc. Know the ethical and legal responsibilities of social workers in interfacing with people who are undocumented immigrants.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 10/5/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
    • 10/6/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 14 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    TBD
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: TBD
  10. Motivational Interviewing for Social Workers

    Utilizing numerous materials including the Professional Training Videotape Series developed by William R. Miller and Stephen Rollnick, this five-week series of 3-hour instruction and skill-building sessions will provide a basic introduction to Motivational Interviewing. Using the video material and supplemental handouts, along with lecture, role-playing and group discussion, this course will lay a foundation for participants to begin to develop their clinical skills in helping people accomplish change in areas of difficult behavior.

    Objectives

    • Describe motivational interviewing / motivational enhancement.
    • Differentiate between internal and external motivation.
    • Identify 4 variables in the "change equation" supported by multiple research findings.
    • Describe the relationship between motivational interviewing and the Transtheoretical Model of Change.
    • Identify basic tools/skills of motivational interviewing.
    • Identify 5 basic principles of motivational interviewing, and ethical issues regarding MI practice.
    • Describe 6 traps to avoid when using a motivational approach.
    • Identify 5 opening strategies of motivational interviewing.
    • Apply skills in early engagement, information exchange, and initiation of a plan of action with a client.
    • Describe 4-phase, overarching target hierarchy that organizes motivational work with clients.
    • Apply reflective listening skills in role-playing.
    • Identify 9 methods for evoking "change talk" with ambivalent clients.
    • Distinguish between the 4 types of "preparatory change talk," and the 3 types of "mobilizing change talk."
    • Describe methods for responding to severe ambivalence without creating discord in the therapeutic relationship.
    • Identify additional resources for developing MI/ME skills.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 10/5/2019 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM
    • 10/12/2019 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM
    • 10/19/2019 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM
    • 10/26/2019 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM
    • 11/2/2019 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 15 regular face-to-face

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    TBD
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

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