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  1. Social Work Practice in Rural Settings Mini-course

    This minicourse will examine practice theory and techniques relevant to social work in a rural setting. There are many definitions of what might be considered a rural community. For the purposes of this course, we will define communities as rural that have a population size of 2,500 to 20,000 with no major metropolitan area within hour of the community. Rural communities are often plagued with similar problems as vast metropolitan areas such as high poverty rates, inadequate housing, and inadequate access to health care. However, the scarcity of resources and professionals including medical providers, socioeconomic underdevelopment, and physical distance from services and lack of public transportation are frequently identified as compounding factors of living in a rural community. The impact of differences in the key diversity dimensions such as ability, age, class, color, culture, ethnicity, family structure, gender (including gender identity and gender expression) marital status, national origin, race, religion or spirituality, sex, and sexual orientation will be examined, within the context of practicing in a rural community. This course will also emphasize issues of ethical practice as defined by the social work code of ethics within a rural community.

    Objectives

    • Define "rural communities." Understand and reflect on personal experience with rural social work practice.
    • Identify themes, similarities and differences of rural social work practice.
    • Define challenges of poverty in rural America and the impact of welfare reform on rural areas.
    • Define "dual relationships" according to the NASW and APA.
    • Describe the ethical challenges dual relationships present in rural communities.
    • Describe the various roles in as a social services administrator in a rural setting. Describe the complexities of working within a small community and ethical implications, including dual relationships, funding and scope of practice.
    • Describe differences and similarities of non-profits and functions within a rural setting in comparison to a urban area. List two similarities and differences.
    • Identify issues specific to services for chronically mentally ill in rural populations. Identify three issues that are relevant to services for the chronically mentally ill in rural populations.
    • Identify two differences between contemporary ways of practice in urban areas in comparison to practice in rural mental health settings.
    • Identify three unique issues of living in rural communities as related to practice and access to resources.
    • Identify positive and negative experiences in the stories witnessed in "The Farmer's Wife." Identify interventions that would be helpful as related to what has been discussed in the session so far.
    • Identify the unique issues faced by minorities living in rural communities.
    • Identify specific issues that are relevant to practice with American Natives and Alaskan Native communities in rural settings.
    • Describe the role of religion and spirituality in current social work practice. Identify how that might be different in rural settings or practice. Discuss the importance of collaboration in rural communities.

    Sessions

    • 6/1/2018 9:00am to 5:00pm
    • 6/2/2018 9:00am to 5:00pm

    CEUs

    • 7 Clinical CEUs
    • 2 Ethics CEUs
    • 5 Macro CEUs

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: 2752

    Fees

    $265.00
  2. Animal Assisted Therapy Introduction Experiential Workshop

    This workshop will start with an orientation webinar on Friday June 1 from 2-5pm. The remainder of the course, which is primarily experiential, will meet at the instructor's farm in Dexter, Michigan on Saturday, June 2.

    Course Description:
    This course provides an experiential opportunity for students to explore animal-assisted therapeutic activities specifically designed to further a wide range of therapeutic goals with children, adolescents, families and adult clients. Like play therapy and art therapy, animal-assisted interventions, when integrated with evidence-based methods including (but not limited to) CBT and mindfulness, trauma recovery, family systems, cultural-relational and psychodynamic approaches, offer opportunities for people to work through a variety of issues and insecurities related to attachment, trauma, self-esteem and identity concerns, dysregulation, behavioral difficulties, mental illness, developmental disabilities, and family and relational problems. With selected animals as therapy partners, the therapeutic team helps people of all ages and positions foster new alliances, understand more fully existing problems and build practical life-skills to enhance confidence, effectiveness and joy. Presently, animal-assisted therapy is gaining acclaim in the field of mental health intervention and there is a growing body of evidence supporting its efficacy and standards in the field to be explored. This course introduces the theoretical foundations, standards, ethics, evidence, certifications, integration of methods, case examples, evaluation and practical skills involved in partnering with a variety of animals, in particular dogs, cats, goats, pigs, horses and chickens (yes, chickens!)- to provide engaging and effective interventions.

    Objectives

    • Identify key concepts in animal-assisted therapy.
    • Define terms associated with animal-assisted interventions.
    • Identify issues pertaining to experiential animal-assisted interventions in the therapeutic farm setting.
    • Identify key ethical and safety considerations associated with animal-assisted interventions through experiential exercises and discussion.
    • Distinguish between animals as therapeutic partners and as tools through interactions with animals.
    • Apply personal skills such as self-awareness in animal activities that focus on engagement.
    • Apply clinical observational and assessment skills through small group and animal interactions.
    • Describe key roles and responsibilities in animal-assisted therapy.
    • Integrate evidence-based and best practice methods with animal-assisted interventions.
    • Apply animal-assisted challenge experiences in a group experiential exercise.

    Sessions

    • 6/1/2018 2:00pm to 5:00pm
    • 6/2/2018 9:00am to 5:00pm

    CEUs

    • 7 Clinical CEUs

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: Online (Day 1)/Farm in Dexter (Day 2)

    Fees

    $195.00
  3. HIV/AIDS: Evidence Based Programs, Policies and Services Mini-course

    This mini-course will acquaint students with the basic and advanced facts about AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome), sensitize students to the multitude of public health, social policy and social service delivery issues that AIDS presents, and provide US and global perspectives to HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention. Students will be sensitized to the special challenges AIDS presents for social work practice. Students will be presented with an approach to evidence based practice, and will review the state of HIV related evidence based prevention practice from national and global perspectives.

    Objectives

    • Describe the historical and current incidence and prevalence of HIV/AIDS worldwide, with a focus on the United States, particularly African-American, Latino, Native Americans and other communities at risk.
    • Understand the nature of the disease, discuss differential transmission among population groups, and describe strategies for prevention and intervention at micro and macro levels.
    • Apply conceptual frameworks for understanding HIV/AIDS through examining appropriate theoretical perspectives and differential community responses.
    • Analyze and describe the impact of particular social policies and resources guiding HIV- related comprehensive care delivery systems.
    • Understand the psychological effects present for HIV/AIDS infected clients, families, and significant others, and for society as a whole.
    • Discuss the challenges and limitations of working with a range of persons with HIV infection, including chronically and terminally ill persons, and assist in the assessment of the psychological and emotional impact that these demands may have on occupational functioning.
    • Discuss typical ethical concerns related to HIV/AIDS programs, policies, and services.
    • Identify and discuss HIV virology and pathogenesis.
    • Identify basic global response issues for HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS).
    • Identify and discuss a model for ethical decision making in clinical HIV/AIDS decisions.
    • Identify and discuss DSM 5 issues with PLWA and PLWA caregivers.
    • Identify and discuss pharmacokinetics of AIDS and psychotropic medications.
    • Identify and discuss critical case related issues in service delivery and HIV at individual, family and group levels.
    • Explain US domestic AIDS policy: RWCA, Treatment and Prevention Funding. Describe the efforts at creating social media and digital technologies related to HIV prevention, care and treatment.

    Sessions

    • 6/6/2018 9:00am to 5:00pm
    • 6/13/2018 9:00am to 5:00pm

    CEUs

    • 2 Ethics CEUs
    • 12 Macro CEUs

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: 3752

    Fees

    $265.00
  4. Working with Individuals with Dementia and Their Families Mini-course

    This course introduces students to the world of dementia care for older adults and family caregivers. Demographic data regarding increased incidence of dementia in all ethnic/racial and socioeconomic groups will frame examination of intervention research with individuals with dementia and family caregivers.

    Objectives

    • Define basic terminology and concepts in dementia care.
    • Describe the progression of Alzheimer's disease.
    • Describe strengths-based approaches to assessment in dementia care.
    • Recognize some of the ethical issues in dementia care.
    • Describe differential diagnostic process for dementia.
    • Describe MCI and different forms of progressive dementia.
    • Respond appropriately to family questions about diagnosis.
    • Describe the difference between delirium and dementia.
    • Articulate issues related to hospitalization and transitions in care.
    • Describe behavioral challenges and interventions in dementia care.
    • Identify and discuss policy issues in dementia care.
    • Identify interventions related to driving and dementia.
    • Describe communication and strategies to help caregivers with challenging situations.
    • Identify caregiver stressors and evidence based interventions, in particular resources for low-income caregivers.

    Sessions

    • 6/8/2018 9:00am to 5:00pm
    • 6/9/2018 9:00am to 5:00pm

    CEUs

    • 10 Clinical CEUs
    • 1 Ethics CEUs
    • 3 Macro CEUs

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: 3752

    Fees

    $265.00
  5. Family Psychoeducation Intervention in Work with Adults, Adolescents, Children and Their Families/Extended Support Networks Mini-course

    This course will focus on developing the group work skills necessary to implement evidence-based family psychoeducation interventions in work with adults, adolescents, children and their families. Special emphasis will be given to the family psychoeducation approach using multiple family groups in the treatment of severe psychiatric disorders. This course will examine the theoretical and empirical foundations for family psychoeducation, as well as, the practice of multifamily group treatment in schizophrenia, bi-polar illness, major depressive disorder, borderline personality disorder and with children and adolescents with serious mental illnesses.

    Objectives

    • Describe the psycho-biology of schizophrenia, the effects of the illness on the individual and the family.
    • Identify coping strategies to share with families and people with schizophrenia.
    • Apply the problem solving method and other FPE techniques to help run or start a group.
    • Describe the efficacy of FPE and how it is different from standard treatment for schizophrenia.
    • List other illnesses/disabilities FPE has been used with.
    • Describe the concept of high expressed emotion, how it effects patients with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, and how FPE attempts to change those behaviors.
    • Describe the psycho-biology and bio-social impact of bipolar disorder.
    • Describe how McFarlane's Family Psychoeducation method is used with bipolar disorder.
    • Describe how Family Focused Treatment, another EBP used with bipolar disorder, compares and contrasts with McFarlane's Family Psychoeducation method as it is used with bipolar disorder.
    • Describe how Family Psychoeducation has been used in other countries, and with minority cultures inside the U.S. Describe the effectiveness and modifications that were necessary to make it effective in other cultural contexts.
    • Identify the Family Psychoeducation (FPE) Family Guidelines for schizophrenia, and describe how they are used with families.
    • Identify the principles for interacting with people with schizophrenia based on the psychobiology of that illness.
    • Identify the Family Psychoeducation (FPE) Family Guidelines for bipolar disorder, and how they are used with families.
    • Identify high expressed emotion in families. Describe how Family Focused Treatment attempts to assess and change high expressed emotion in families with a bipolar disorder. Describe Social Rhythm Theory and how family and other daily routines, or change in/lack of them, can impact the course of bipolar disorder.

    Sessions

    • 6/9/2018 9:00am to 5:00pm
    • 6/16/2018 9:00am to 5:00pm

    CEUs

    • 14 Clinical CEUs

    Instructor

    • James Svensson

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: 2752

    Fees

    $265.00
  6. Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) for Older Adults Mini-course

    The Thursday course days will be held at the U-M School of Social Work. Saturday, July 7th, the class will meet at Turner Senior Resource Center, 2401 Plymouth Rd.

    This course will address how depression & anxiety in late life compromise the quality of life in older adults. The students will be assisted to deepen their understanding of the thought process of those with depression and anxiety. They will learn how MBCT could help improve the disorder and see MBCT as a viable non-pharmacology intervention.

    The scientific evidence in the effectiveness of mindfulness interventions for mental health issues, and specifically MBCT for prevention of relapse of depression and anxiety will be discussed. The step-by step components of 8 sessions of MBCT wil be discussed and students will have opportunities to practice the skills. They will learn the differences in approaches between MBCT and CBT. Adaptation made to accommodate working with older population will be discussed in detail. The results of pre-post outcome data and qualitative evaluation of the MBCT groups the instructor led with local older adults will be shared. The roles that a MBCT therapist plays and the training needed will be discussed.

    Objectives

    • Define "mindfulness".
    • Describe a challenge that older adults face in receiving treatment for depression.
    • Describe the relationship between rumination and depression.
    • List 7 pillars of mindfulness practice.
    • Identify 3 major components of MBCT (mindfulness-based cognitive therapy) program.
    • Describe the difference between MBCT and CBT (cognitive behavioral therapy) in the ways they deal with negative thoughts.
    • Describe two adaptation examples to accommodate the older adult population.
    • Describe two exclusion criteria when selecting participants for MBCT groups.
    • Describe two research findings that MBCT has been demonstrated to be effective.
    • Describe one neuroscientic finding of mindfulness meditation practice.
    • Describe 3 important qualities the MBCT therapists need to have in order to facilitate skillfully.
    • Describe 3 examples of home assignments MBCT gives to its participants
    • Describe a mindset of mindfulness.
    • Describe the difference between "being mode" and "doing mode". Describe why the MBCT therapists need their personal mindfulness practice.

    Sessions

    • 6/28/2018 10:00am to 4:00pm
    • 7/5/2018 10:00am to 4:00pm
    • 7/7/2018 10:00am to 3:00pm

    CEUs

    • 14 Clinical CEUs

    Instructor

    • Mariko A. Foulk

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: 2752 & off-site

    Fees

    $265.00
  7. Multicultural Competencies in Sexuality Education, Counseling, and Therapy Mini-course

    This course will address the sexual health needs of individuals and couples throughout the adult lifespan over diverse cultures and populations. This interpersonal practice minicourse can augment other interpersonal practice courses or can be taken independently. Building on basic sex therapy models and integrating these models with multicultural counseling theory and cultural and ethical competencies, course participants will examine their own cultural backgrounds, belief systems, and biases specifically with reference to sexual health. Utilizing the lifespan approach, key considerations in sexual health education and sexual health treatments will be described. Course participants will learn culturally appropriate assessment, diagnosis, and brief intervention approaches and will be challenged to think about the adjustment of interventions to include multicultural considerations and the intersectionality of clients identities. The course will emphasize strengths-based adaptation and resiliency in individual and couples sexual health challenges. The right to education in sexual health and treatment of sexual health problems will be discussed within the framework of mental health care.

    Objectives

    • Describe biopsychosocial theory of health as it applies to sexual function.
    • Describe the components of Multicultural Theory and how to apply it to sexuality education and therapy.
    • Describe cultural bias and implement skills in effectively managing biases and counter-transference when addressing sexuality education and sexual health treatments.
    • Describe one characteristic of erotic-transference and identify the importance of self-awareness in appropriate boundary setting in practice.
    • Identify two challenges in understanding sexual health cross culturally.
    • Describe the components of PLISSIT.
    • Describe the elements of DOUPE.
    • Describe the ADDRESSING Model.
    • Identify two examples of influence of religions on sexual health.
    • Identify two sexual myths held by many individuals in dominant North American culture.
    • Identify one example of how aging affects sexual function.
    • Identify two social stressors experienced by transgender individuals in their social contexts.
    • Describe one sex therapy concern for LGBT individuals.
    • Identify one negative impact of sexual abuse and exploitation on children and adults.

    Sessions

    • 7/20/2018 9:00am to 5:00pm
    • 7/21/2018 9:00am to 5:00pm

    CEUs

    • 14 Clinical CEUs

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: 2752

    Fees

    $265.00
  8. ACEs, Resilience, and Prevention: Research-Practice Intersections In-Service Training

    This course will provide an overview of research on adverse childhood experiences and resilience in children, youth, and families. Participants will learn about goals for prevention and intervention programs designed lessen risk and to improve the life chances of those who are vulnerable because of ACE exposure. Content presentation, discussion, and small group work will focus on ways to integrate current research into practice settings. Material covered in the course is relevant to those entering or working in child welfare, health care, school systems, and juvenile justice.

    Objectives

    • Describe findings from current research on ACEs and resilience in vulnerable children, youth, and families.
    • Identify ways to apply research to practice in service settings.
    • Develop individual goals and opportunities to incorporate content into professional practice.

    Sessions

    • 9/21/2018 9:00am to 12:15pm

    CEUs

    • 3 Clinical CEUs

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: ECC (1840 )

    Fees

    $65.00
  9. Pain, Effective Intervention, and the Opioid Crisis Asynchronous Webinar

    Pain is an often discussed experience that is not often well understood. This course equips the participant with a comprehensive overview of the different types of pain, and the variety of both medicinal and non-pharmacological interventions shown to be helpful in addressing conditions including the experience of pain. Historical and other contributing factors of the so-called "Opioid Epidemic" are also discussed.

    Objectives

    • Define 3 types of pain, examine the ways in which pain is a subjective experience, and distinguish how pain is impacted by multiple biopsychosocial factors.
    • Describe examples of medicinal and non-pharmacological interventions for treating pain, and cite risk factors that have contributed to the opioid epidemic.

    Sessions

    • self-paced

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: Online

    Fees

    $45.00

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