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Continuing Education Course Catalog

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  1. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Children and Adolescents with Anxiety Problems

    The focus of this skill-based mini course is on the concepts, theory, principles and procedures appropriate to the assessment and effective cognitive-behavioral therapy of children and adolescents with anxiety problems. The course content reflects advanced material of current relevance for effective clinical practice. Specifically, this course will provide updated training in the cognitive-behavioral treatment of anxiety disorders in children and youth.

    Objectives

    • Assess and diagnose children and adolescents with anxiety disorders and understand the impact of various diversity dimensions (e.g., age, gender, race, culture) during the assessment, diagnosis and intervention phases of work.
    • Incorporate social work values and ethical principles in planning and implementing cognitive behavioral therapy for children and youth.
    • Design, develop, implement and affect education and understanding of CBT tripartite model of emotion with children and youth with anxiety disorders.
    • Design, develop, implement and affect education and anxiety management techniques (breathing retraining and progressive muscle relaxation) with children and youth with anxiety disorders.
    • Practice role plays of anxiety management techniques (breathing retraining and progressive muscle relaxation) with children and youth with anxiety disorders.
    • Implement and utilize cognitive coping self-statements with pediatric clients.
    • Implement and utilize cognitive-restructuring techniques.
    • Implement and utilize coping cards, problem-solving strategies and social skills training techniques.
    • Describe the mechanisms for change related to exposure-based intervention including inhibitory learning.
    • Develop graded fear hierarchies and understand how to implement them with children and adolescents.
    • Design and implement in vivo exposure plans for a variety of anxiety-producing situations.
    • Design and implement in vivo exposure plans for a variety of anxiety-producing situations for social anxiety and panic.
    • Plan and implement evidence-based cognitive behavioral interventions that are based on identifiable goals and priorities in a culturally sensitive and culturally competent manner.
    • Describe the nature of pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder and complete a behavioral assessment of OCD symptoms.
    Mini-course

    Sessions

    • 10/6/2018 9am to 5pm
    • 10/13/2018 9am to 5pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 14 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: TBA

    Fees

    $265.00
  2. Knowing What You See: Skills to Observe Parent-Infant/Young Child Relationships

    What do interactions between babies and their caregivers "tell us" about the nature of their relationship? Are there ways of interacting that can help us understand when the relationship is strong, at risk or worrisome? This workshop is designed to help child welfare professionals attend to the more subtle aspects of parent-young child relationships as a way to be more helpful to strengthening or supporting the parent-infant/young child relationship.

    Objectives

    • Identify three key domains of interaction to assess for relational health.
    • Identify two markers of healthy parent-infant relationships.
    • Identify and respond to two markers of worrisome parent-infant relationships.
    In-Service Training

    Sessions

    • 10/12/2018 1pm to 4:15pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 3 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: 1636

    Fees

    $65.00
  3. Adventure/Experiential-Based Therapy

    This class will focus on the use of adventure-based activities in therapy with individuals, groups and families. Students will be introduced to adventure through readings, discussions, guest speakers and experiences. This one credit mini-course is designed to provide the student with a theoretical, philosophical and experiential understanding of adventure and experiential learning and its application to therapy. Course content includes the theoretical and philosophical foundations of adventure based practice, a discourse on the safe and appropriate use of adventure activities with different client groups, a demonstration on facilitating adventure activities, and use of adventure activities in assessment and intervention.

    Objectives

    • Describe how adventure and experiential activities can be utilized in therapy.
    • Adapt adventure tools for use indoors, particularly in small office settings.
    • Identify at least two ethical concerns related to Adventure Therapy.
    • Demonstrate an ability to practice within one's scope of practice and training.
    • Illustrate a level of familiarity with adventure and experiential therapy of specific relevance to the student.
    • Describe how to adapt activities contingent on developmental and psychological considerations.
    • Apply a facilitation model for adventure and experiential practice.
    • Describe an experiential approach to addressing resistance.
    • Describe the theory behind adventure and experiential practice and therapy.
    • Develop activities for their intentional use with specific clients and client populations.
    • Distinguish between Adventure Practice, Experiential Practice and Adventure Therapy.
    • Describe effective use of self with regard to adventure practice and therapy.
    • Identify ways to make the adventure/experiential approach more accessible to all ability levels.
    • Identify ways in which this approach can be adapted to accommodate for client diversity.
    Mini-course

    Sessions

    • 10/20/2018 9am-5pm
    • 10/27/2018 9am-5pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 14 regular in-person

    Location

    University of Michigan School of Social Work
    1080 South University Ave.
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

    Fees

    $265.00
  4. Immigration Enforcement, Human Rights, and Social Justice

    This mini-course focuses on the real community and personal impact of a public policy with sweeping national controversy, many deaths, and significant questions about social justice, racial discrimination, and even intent in the constitution. Because it is a mini-course, rather than a full course, this course will concentrate on one aspect of immigration policy? undocumented immigrants and the public policy strategy of enforcement for undocumented immigrants at the border and in the interior of the country. Along with discussion of the policies and practices of enforcement, we will bring local enforcement activities to the table and examine their impact on people, families, and Michigan communities. The discussion will have a global, national, state, and a local component. Students in this course will acquire the skills to critically analyze this aspect of immigration policy and its controversies. and about community and organization responses and activism.

    Objectives

    • Identify and assess the language, intent, and extent of enforcement policies, the strategies and tactics of enforcement, and government entities related to enforcement.
    • Analyze the economic, social, and health impact of enforcement on individuals, families and communities.
    • Apply immigrant rights information effectively in community organizing and other activism.
    • Describe the history, causes, and consequences of undocumented immigration.
    • Identify personal attitudes and knowledge regarding immigrant populations and immigration issues.
    • Outline the history of immigration policy.
    • Describe the impact of increased immigration enforcement on the local Latino immigrant community, including the implications of being within 100 miles of the northern US border.
    • Identify implications of the largest immigration raid in the country.
    • Describe controversies related to the development of the Department of Homeland Security.
    • Explain the facts and controversies related to increased border enforcement at the southern border, toward awareness.
    • Identify social work and advocacy interventions at the southern border to protect migrant populations.
    • Engage with people who have been affected by increased immigration enforcement.
    • Describe recent (last 10 years) immigration policy reform efforts.
    • Identify core principles of humane immigration reform. Identify examples of advocacy efforts to create positive changes in local policies affecting undocumented immigrant populations, i.e. local police, city resolutions, tuition equality, etc. Know the ethical and legal responsibilities of social workers in interfacing with people who are undocumented immigrants.
    Mini-course

    Sessions

    • 10/20/2018 9:00am to 5:00pm
    • 10/21/2018 9:00am to 5:00pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 14 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: TBD

    Fees

    $265.00
  5. Building Interactive Dashboards in Excel

    Today, data is everywhere. In nonprofits, we now have access to a massive amount of data about finances, clients, and program effectiveness. Extracting useful takeaway messages and next steps from our massive data can be very challenging. This is where a dashboard comes in handy! Dashboards can help an organization synthesize and make meaning from a large amount of data. Like your car’s dashboard, they summarize your organization's data in a visually engaging way that is simple and easy-to-understand. They can be shared with boards, staff, donors, and grantmakers. The best part is that these can be built in a way where they are interactive and auto-update when new data is added.

    When we can engage our audiences with intentional reporting, they will be more equipped to make data-driven decisions. In this training, we will make an interactive dashboard in Excel from scratch. Jennifer will teach best practices, grounded in the literature, that will make your data come to life in a meaningful and time-efficient manner. Participants will learn how to use pivot tables, pivot charts, graphics, and strategic text in designing the dashboard.

    Objectives

    • Describe the steps needed to build a dashboard in Excel.
    • Describe strategies to present data that tells a story, leading to increased audience engagement and data-driven decision making.
    • Apply graphic design best practices to enhance data visualizations (like a dashboard) with simple, implementable steps.
    Workshop

    Sessions

    • 10/25/2018 9am to 12:00pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 3 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: ECC (1840 )

    Fees

    $65.00
  6. Philanthropy and Evaluation

    This mini-course will focus on issues of contemporary philanthropy and the ways in which both philanthropic entities and their grantees can evaluate the efficiency, effectiveness and impact of philanthropic investments.

    Objectives

    • Outline the history of philanthropy within the US.
    • Describe contemporary trends pertaining to philanthropy and learn how to develop a network of philanthropic partners.
    • Identify the various types of philanthropic organizations and current social media trends pertaining to philanthropy.
    • Locate foundations and access 990 forms to inform their selection of a foundation for application.
    • Describe considerations and criteria for selecting a foundation.
    • Describe investments trends from the individual to the organizational level.
    • Describe how foundations are using place-based and system-focused giving strategies as well as capacity-building investment.
    • Describe how various foundations approach evaluation and measurement of impact with their grantees.
    • Develop measureable indicators and locate standardized scales to measure participant impact.
    • Use a mission money matrix to better understand program financial sustainability and impact.
    • Describe three foundations and their approaches to building grantee evaluation capacity.
    • Develop a case study of a foundation that matches their area of interest.
    • Critically review grantee evaluation reports.
    • Describe career opportunities within philanthropy and as evaluation practitioners.
    Mini-course

    Sessions

    • 11/3/2018 9am to 5pm
    • 11/17/2018 9am to 5pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 14 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    School of Social Work
    1080 South University
    B798
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

    Fees

    $265.00
  7. Using Individuals with Disabilities Education Act to Ensure Students' Rights to Education

    This course will provide an overview of students' rights to evaluation under the Individual with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Participants will learn about basics mandates of special education law including an overview of the special education evaluation process and how to advocate effectively for students suspected of having a disability.

    Objectives

    • Describe four questions that an evaluation needs to answer in order for a child or youth to qualify as a student with a disability under the Individuals with Disability Education Act.
    • Define "Autism Spectrum Disorder," "Emotional Impairment," and "Otherwise Health Impaired" in educational settings.
    • Describe three techniques that they can use to advocate for students' right to evaluation under IDEA.
    In-Service Training

    Sessions

    • 11/13/2018 9am to 12:15pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 3 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    School of Social Work
    1080 S. University Ave
    ECC Room 1840
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

    Fees

    $65.00
  8. Illness Management and Recovery

    Illness Management and Recovery IMR) is promoted by SAMHSA as an evidence based, psychiatric rehabilitation practice. The primary aims of IMR are to empower people with mental illness to manage their illnesses, work on actionable goals toward recovery, and make informed decisions about their treatment by acquiring knowledge and skills. Workshop participants will learn the philosophy and research behind the practice, and then will have the opportunity to practice IMR in dyads and small groups.

    Objectives

    • Describe four core components of Illness Management and Recovery.
    • Develop of stress management plans.
    • Identify social work practices that support empowered consumer involvement in decisions regarding medication decisions and medication management.
    Workshop

    Sessions

    • 11/16/2018 9am to 12pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 3 regular in-person

    Instructor

    • Roberta C. Walker

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: 1840 (ECC)

    Fees

    $65.00
  9. Affirmative Counseling and Advocacy with TGLBQ People

    This course will introduce and address issues of concern to interpersonal practice clients that identify as Transgender, Lesbian, Bisexual, Gay, Queer or questioning, focusing on the basic knowledge, interpersonal practice and advocacy skills it takes to become increasingly competent in providing counseling and advocacy for people who are members of these marginalized, yet highly resilient, groups. From a strength-based perspective, grounded in Affirmative Practice Principles, this course will focus on basic social work knowledge and understanding of these groups, the social injustice and stigma they face; but ultimately, how to effectively engage, assess and intervene with current, associated issues through therapy and advocacy. This course will also address self-exploration and ethical dilemmas for social work students and providers with TBLGQ people, and include real practice experiences with people from our local community. Students will be encouraged to actively engage in the course. Class participation is critical to the success of the course.

    Objectives

    • Describe Affirmative Practice Principles with TBLGQ people and communities.
    • Become conversant in Affirmative Practice Principles with TBLGQ people and communities.
    • Describe the social work ethical principles essential to effective work with TBLGQ clients.
    • Evaluate assumptions and build relational-cultural skills in questioning and commenting of joining, empathy, mutuality, and use of self.
    • Use current information about TBLGQ people to effectively advocate for clients.
    • Outline the history and progress of the TBLGQ civil rights movement.
    • Describe the impact of the TBLGQ civil rights movement over life span of an elder community member and activist.
    • Assess ethical and culturally-sensitive responses to TBLGQ people.
    • Identify ways in which unique intersections of marginalized identities affect TBLGQ clients.
    • Describe effective advocacy examples with TBLGQ clients.
    • Identify and assess the stresses and the strengths of TBLGQ individuals, families and groups toward resolution of presenting issues and problems of concern to social work.
    • Analyze the economic, social, and health issues associated with the current socio-political impacts and health policy on TBLGQ populations.
    • Describe TBLGQ issues and practice engagement skills over the life-span with a focus on health in aging individuals.
    • Describe empowering community organization models with TBLGQ people from examples provided in the class.
    Mini-course

    Sessions

    • 11/17/2018 9am to 5pm
    • 11/18/2018 9am to 5pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 ethics in-person
    • 12 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: TBD

    Fees

    $265.00
  10. Family Psychoeducation Intervention in Work with Adults, Adolescents, Children and Their Families/Extended Support Networks

    This course will focus on developing the group work skills necessary to implement evidence-based family psychoeducation interventions in work with adults, adolescents, children and their families. Special emphasis will be given to the family psychoeducation approach using multiple family groups in the treatment of severe psychiatric disorders. This course will examine the theoretical and empirical foundations for family psychoeducation, as well as, the practice of multifamily group treatment in schizophrenia, bi-polar illness, major depressive disorder, borderline personality disorder and with children and adolescents with serious mental illnesses.

    Objectives

    • Describe the psycho-biology of schizophrenia, the effects of the illness on the individual and the family.
    • Identify coping strategies to share with families and people with schizophrenia.
    • Apply the problem solving method and other FPE techniques to help run or start a group.
    • Describe the efficacy of FPE and how it is different from standard treatment for schizophrenia.
    • List other illnesses/disabilities FPE has been used with.
    • Describe the concept of high expressed emotion, how it effects patients with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, and how FPE attempts to change those behaviors.
    • Describe the psycho-biology and bio-social impact of bipolar disorder.
    • Describe how McFarlane's Family Psychoeducation method is used with bipolar disorder.
    • Describe how Family Focused Treatment, another EBP used with bipolar disorder, compares and contrasts with McFarlane's Family Psychoeducation method as it is used with bipolar disorder.
    • Describe how Family Psychoeducation has been used in other countries, and with minority cultures inside the U.S. Describe the effectiveness and modifications that were necessary to make it effective in other cultural contexts.
    • Identify the Family Psychoeducation (FPE) Family Guidelines for schizophrenia, and describe how they are used with families.
    • Identify the principles for interacting with people with schizophrenia based on the psychobiology of that illness.
    • Identify the Family Psychoeducation (FPE) Family Guidelines for bipolar disorder, and how they are used with families.
    • Identify high expressed emotion in families.
    • Describe Social Rhythm Theory and how family and other daily routines, or change in/lack of them, can impact the course of bipolar disorder.
    • Describe how Family Focused Treatment attempts to assess and change high expressed emotion in families with a bipolar disorder.
    Mini-course

    Sessions

    • 12/1/2018 9:00am to 5:00pm
    • 12/8/2018 9:00am to 5:00pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 14 regular in-person

    Instructor

    • James Svensson

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: TBA

    Fees

    $265.00

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