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  1. Delivering Social Justice Oriented Private Outpatient Behavioral Health Services (Part 3) - Practice Strategies

    This workshop is part three of a four-part series on social justice oriented approaches to offering private behavioral health services in a private practice setting. This section focuses on practice strategies. While we encourage participants to complete all four parts, you may also select those that best fit your needs and schedule.

    This series will provide a foundational understanding of private and public behavioral health services so that participants are able to identify the skills needed to deliver outpatient services as a clinician with a social justice orientation. With increased access to behavioral health services through policies such as Health Care Parity and the Affordable Care Act, more community members with mild to moderate need for behavioral health services are seeking care and there is a greater need for non-public behavioral health care providers who deliver culturally-responsive and socially-just services.

    Objectives

    • Identify social work core competencies.
    • Describe two tools and strategies to integrate to demonstrate socially just practice.
    • Describe the role of clinician in private outpatient setting as a social worker.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 5/29/2020 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2.75 regular synchronous interactive

    Skill Level

    Intermediate & Advanced

    Instructors

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 S University Ave
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: 1840 (ECC)
  2. Delivering Social Justice Oriented Private Outpatient Behavioral Health Services (Part 4) - Business Strategies

    This workshop is part four of a four-part series on social justice oriented approaches to offering private behavioral health services in a private practice setting. This section focuses on business strategies. While we encourage participants to complete all four parts, you may also select those that best fit your needs and schedule.

    This series will provide a foundational understanding of private and public behavioral health services so that participants are able to identify the skills needed to deliver outpatient services as a clinician with a social justice orientation. With increased access to behavioral health services through policies such as Health Care Parity and the Affordable Care Act, more community members with mild to moderate need for behavioral health services are seeking care and there is a greater need for non-public behavioral health care providers who deliver culturally-responsive and socially-just services.

    Objectives

    • Identify funding sources for private behavioral health services.
    • Describe the credentialing process for Michigan state insurance plans.
    • Identify three strategies for sharing information about services delivered.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 5/29/2020 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2.75 regular synchronous interactive

    Skill Level

    Intermediate & Advanced

    Instructors

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 S University Ave
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: 1840 (ECC)
  3. Social Work Practice in Rural Settings

    This minicourse will examine practice theory and techniques relevant to social work in a rural setting. There are many definitions of what might be considered a rural community. For the purposes of this course, we will define communities as rural that have a population size of 2,500 to 20,000 with no major metropolitan area within hour of the community. Rural communities are often plagued with similar problems as vast metropolitan areas such as high poverty rates, inadequate housing, and inadequate access to health care. However, the scarcity of resources and professionals including medical providers, socioeconomic underdevelopment, and physical distance from services and lack of public transportation are frequently identified as compounding factors of living in a rural community. The impact of differences in the key diversity dimensions such as ability, age, class, color, culture, ethnicity, family structure, gender (including gender identity and gender expression) marital status, national origin, race, religion or spirituality, sex, and sexual orientation will be examined, within the context of practicing in a rural community. This course will also emphasize issues of ethical practice as defined by the social work code of ethics within a rural community.

    Objectives

    • Define "rural communities." Understand and reflect on personal experience with rural social work practice.
    • Identify themes, similarities and differences of rural social work practice.
    • Describe challenges of poverty in rural America and the impact of welfare reform on rural areas.
    • Define "dual relationships" according to the NASW and APA.
    • Describe the ethical challenges dual relationships present in rural communities.
    • Describe the various roles in as a social services administrator in a rural setting. Describe the complexities of working within a small community and ethical implications, including dual relationships, funding and scope of practice.
    • Describe differences and similarities of non-profits and functions within a rural setting in comparison to a urban area. List two similarities and differences.
    • Identify issues specific to services for chronically mentally ill in rural populations. Identify three issues that are relevant to services for the chronically mentally ill in rural populations.
    • Identify two differences between contemporary ways of practice in urban areas in comparison to practice in rural mental health settings.
    • Identify three unique issues of living in rural communities as related to practice and access to resources.
    • Identify positive and negative experiences in the stories witnessed in "The Farmer's Wife." Identify interventions that would be helpful as related to what has been discussed in the session so far.
    • Identify the unique issues faced by minorities living in rural communities.
    • Identify specific issues that are relevant to practice with American Natives and Alaskan Native communities in rural settings.
    • Describe the role of religion and spirituality in current social work practice. Identify how that might be different in rural settings or practice. Discuss the importance of collaboration in rural communities.
    hybrid course

    Sessions

    • 5/29/2020 9am to 5pm
    • 5/30/2020 9am to 5pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 ethics synchronous interactive
    • 2 regular asynchronous online
    • 10 regular synchronous interactive

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Instructor

    Location

    online
  4. Cultural Issues with Opioid Use Disorders/Substance Use Disorders

    This course will address cultural issues, barriers, strengths and needs that may arise in substance use treatment settings. Students will gain a theoretical understanding of cultural awareness models and will explore clinical applications in assessment and intervention. Students will engage in critical discourse concerning strengths, needs and limitations of implementation methods in SUD/OUD practice. Students will review epidemiological data specific to the prevalence of SUD/OUD and utilization trends for diverse cultural and identity groups, and will engage in collaborative peer-to-peer discussions. Concepts relating to race, ethnicity, racial and intergenerational trauma and the clinical relevance to SUD/OUD will be key components. Sub-culture will be addressed in the context of substance use disorders (e.g. spirituality, ritual, symbolism, language, art, music, dance, dress, politics and literature); specialized attention to the impact of these identities and evidence-based treatment strategies to navigating SUD-specific sub-cultures, will be reviewed. Students will actively engage in exercises designed to facilitate skills for ongoing development of cultural awareness in practice contexts, including self and organizational cultural assessments and reflection.

    Objectives

    • Describe different theoretical models of cultural competence in the context of substance use treatment, including opioid use treatment contexts.
    • Apply critical analytical skills to evaluate the available evidence, research and applications of various theoretical models of cultural competence in SUD/OUD treatment contexts.
    • Identify approaches to implementing culturally competent practices in SUD/OUD contexts at individual, organizational and systemic levels.
    • Describe the role of culture in the treatment of SUD/OUD treatment.
    • Use assessment tools for evaluating cultural competence at individual and organizational levels.
    • Identify reflective tools for ongoing cultural awareness and will develop individualized strategies for evaluating cultural competence in practice, and integrating these tools into SUD/OUD practice on an ongoing basis.
    • Describe the epidemiological data concerning the general prevalence and and barriers to treatment for various cultural, racial and ethnic groups.
    • Identify at least 2 approaches to integrating culturally competent practices into SUD/OUD treatment contexts, and will explore how to discern which methods may be appropriate across various cultural contexts.
    • Describe ancillary components and connotations of "culture" in substance use/opioid use treatment contexts and the importance of acknowledging sub-culture in the treatment process.
    • Identify practice needs relative to cultural relevance and accessibility in the context of substance use treatment.
    • Identify strengths and limitations of a variety of clinical tools, reflection and assessment methods; students will develop specific strategies to determine how to decide what tools may best meet client needs in clinical contexts.
    • Describe how stigma, culture and substance use disorders may interact to produce a myriad of barriers to accessible treatment for specific identity-groups.
    • Describe how culture can impact retention and outcomes of SUD/OUD treatment for specific cultural groups.
    • Apply an understanding of cultural competence to specific needs, topics and issues of relevance to specific identity in the context of SUD/OUD Treatment.
    online distance learning (asynchronous)

    Sessions

    • 6/4/2020
    • 6/11/2020

    CE Contact Hours

    • 14 regular asynchronous online

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
  5. Family Psychoeducation Intervention in Work with Adults, Adolescents, Children and Their Families/Extended Support Networks

    This course will focus on developing the group work skills necessary to implement evidence-based family psychoeducation interventions in work with adults, adolescents, children and their families. Special emphasis will be given to the family psychoeducation approach using multiple family groups in the treatment of severe psychiatric disorders. This course will examine the theoretical and empirical foundations for family psychoeducation, as well as, the practice of multifamily group treatment in schizophrenia, bi-polar illness, major depressive disorder, borderline personality disorder and with children and adolescents with serious mental illnesses.

    Objectives

    • Describe the psycho-biology of schizophrenia, the effects of the illness on the individual and the family.
    • Identify coping strategies to share with families and people with schizophrenia.
    • Apply the problem solving method and other FPE techniques to help run or start a group.
    • Describe the efficacy of FPE and how it is different from standard treatment for schizophrenia.
    • List other illnesses/disabilities FPE has been used with.
    • Describe the concept of high expressed emotion, how it effects patients with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, and how FPE attempts to change those behaviors.
    • Describe the psycho-biology and bio-social impact of bipolar disorder.
    • Describe how McFarlane's Family Psychoeducation method is used with bipolar disorder.
    • Describe how Family Focused Treatment, another EBP used with bipolar disorder, compares and contrasts with McFarlane's Family Psychoeducation method as it is used with bipolar disorder.
    • Describe how Family Psychoeducation has been used in other countries, and with minority cultures inside the U.S. Describe the effectiveness and modifications that were necessary to make it effective in other cultural contexts.
    • Describe Open Dialogue, a treatment for first break psychosis developed in Finland. Describe the outcomes of this method.
    • Introduce and discuss the alternative concepts of psychotic disorders, including the Hearing Voices Network and the Recovery Movement
    • Discuss higher functioning individuals with schizophrenia and challenge the misconception that all individuals with schizophrenia are low functioning, on disability and unable to function independently.
    • Discuss issues of uneven access to high quality psychiatric care, the every day discrimination and stigma associated with having a mental illness, and the added discrimination of being a racial or ethnic minority and having a serious and persistent mental illness.
    hybrid course

    Sessions

    • 6/6/2020 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM
    • 6/13/2020 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 10 regular synchronous interactive
    • 6 regular asynchronous online

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Instructor

    • James Svensson

    Location

    online
  6. Sport Social Work: Beyond the Playing Field

    Sport Social Work is becoming a powerful force in the field of sport and recreation. Social workers are leaders in infusing teams, parents, programs, and student athletes with empowerment, self development, and inclusion.

    In this workshop, we will explore how social work values, theories, and interventions are applied on a micro and macro level to enhance sport and recreation services across the lifespan.

    Content will include social work theory, interventions from behavioral psychology, and human development. Workshop participants will have the opportunity for small and large group discussions.

    Objectives

    • Outline the history of sport social work focusing on the contributions of Jane Addams, and prominent sport and social justice pioneers from our past.
    • Describe the relevance of social work values and ethics, PODS, DEI, anti-racism, and anti-oppression interventions and program design in sport social work.
    • Identify curricula for sport and recreation programs for people across the lifespan.
    • Describe the needs of special populations - individuals with disabilities, LGBT youth, people in recovery, and older adults - in sport social work programs.
    • Apply the competencies of engagement, assessment, intervention, research, social and economic justice, human behavior and the social environment, social policy and evaluation to sport social work practice.
    • Identify human development issues across the lifespan and how participation in organized sport and use of social work interventions can address quality of life.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 6/12/2020 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 ethics synchronous interactive
    • 5 regular synchronous interactive

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Instructors

    Location

    online
  7. Evidence-Informed Opioid Use Disorder/Substance Use Disorder including MAT

    This course will focus on Substance Use Disorders, with particular attention to Opioid Use Disorder and evidence-based interventions, including Medication Assisted Treatments (MAT). Fundamental neurobiological, physiological and psychosocial aspects of chemical dependence will be reviewed, with special attention given to Opioid Use Disorder. The pharmacological functions and psychosocial benefits of Medication Assisted Treatments (MAT) will be a focal point of this mini-course. The complexities, benefits and barriers to implementing integrated health care models for Substance Use Disorders, such as MAT, will be given specialized attention. Social justice issues relating to accessible to health care, gender, race and stigma existent in conjunction with substance use disorders, and most especially, opioid use disorders, will be central to this course. Overall, students enrolled in this course will gain an introduction to Substance Use Disorders, with a focus on Opioid Use Disorder and Medication Assisted Treatments, from a harm reduction perspective.

    Objectives

    • Outline basic neurobiological and psychosocial principles related to addiction.
    • Describe the physiological context of Opioid Use Disorder.
    • Identify intoxication and withdraw signs of opioid use and will understand how to use evidence-based screening tools to assess and match clients to appropriate levels of care, including Medication Assisted Treatments.
    • Describe the individual psychosocial and public health context and the breadth of impact of opioid use and other substance use disorders.
    • Describe the evidence-based context of medication assisted interventions.
    • Describe pharmacological actions, clinical candidacy and what integrated treatment looks like for clients on methadone.
    • Describe pharmacological actions, clinical candidacy and what integrated treatment looks like for clients on buprenorphine.
    • Describe pharmacological actions, clinical candidacy and what integrated treatment looks like for clients on naltrexone.
    • Describe pharmacological actions, clinical candidacy and what integrated treatment looks like for clients on medication assisted therapies for Alcohol Use Disorder, including naltrexone, acamprosate and disulfam.
    • Identify current barriers, health disparities and social justice issues, including stigma, surrounding the use of medication assisted interventions.
    • Describe best practices for the treatment of substance use disorders, including MAT, related to populations with complex health care needs, including pregnant and nursing women and infants at risk of neonatal withdraw.
    • Describe best practices for preventing opioid overdose and will receive information on the use of Narcan.
    • Describe best practices for the treatment of substance use disorders, including MAT, related to populations with complex health care needs, including people with comorbid psychiatric diagnoses.
    • Describe best practices for the treatment of substance use disorders, including MAT, related to populations with complex health care needs, including people who inject drugs, and who may be at increased risk for HIV, Hepatitis C and other blood-borne diseases.
    • Participants will understand the basic neurobiological and psychosocial principles related to addiction.
    online distance learning (asynchronous)

    Sessions

    • 6/18/2020
    • 6/25/2020

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 ethics asynchronous online
    • 1 pain management asynchronous online
    • 12 regular asynchronous online

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Instructor

    Location

    online
  8. Legal Issues of Older Adults and Persons with Disabilities

    This course helps students increase their understanding of the legal issues frequently encountered by older adults and persons with disability, including estate planning, planning for incapacity, guardianship, elder abuse and exploitation, advocacy for quality long-term care and other services, eligibility for long-term care benefits and services, and elder abuse and exploitation. Students will discuss readings and case studies in small groups with other students and write short reflective pieces, as well as having the option to observe court proceedings.

    Objectives

    • Describe available care options and services for older adults and persons with disabilities.
    • Identify what Medicare benefits cover regarding acute care.
    • Describe how long-term care is paid for and eligibility for government benefits, including long-term care insurance, Medicaid and Veteran's Aid & Attendance benefits.
    • Identify rights of individuals receiving long-term care.
    • Describe ways to advocate for quality long-term care.
    • Identify the prevalence and community impact of elder abuse and exploitation.
    • Describe personal experiences of elder abuse and exploitation.
    • Identify the definitions, warning signs and how to address the various forms of elder abuse and exploitation.
    • Articulate the importance of promoting self-determination and person-centered care for older adults and persons with disabilities.
    • Understand the ethical issues regarding surrogate decision-making, particularly end-of-life treatment decisions.
    • Describe ways to plan for incapacity and alternatives to guardianship, including estate planning documents.
    • Identify when guardianship should be sought and describe how it works.
    • Describe the importance of estate planning and identify options, including wills and trusts.
    • Articulate how elder mediation and other methods of conflict resolution (e.g., conflict coaching, peacemaking) can address complex family and caregiving dynamics.
    hybrid course

    Sessions

    • 6/24/2020 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
    • 7/1/2020 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 6 regular asynchronous online
    • 8 regular live interactive online

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Instructor

    Location

    online
  9. Theory and Practice of Infant Mental Health

    This introductory course will examine the principles of Infant Mental Health intervention with families of infants and young children. Using attachment theory as a foundation, we will examine best practices in supporting early developing relationships between infants and young children and their caregivers. Special attention will be given to understanding the processes through which practitioners can promote infant well-being and expand parenting capacity to nurture and protect their children.

    Objectives

    • Describe the history of social science with regard to past theories of child development and how they influence cultural norms of parenting
    • Describe theories of the relationship between early parent-infant interaction and subsequent development
    • Identify key features of four attachment templates of babies
    • Identify key features of four states of mind regarding attachment of parents
    • Identify consequences of failures or disruptions of the attachment process for both parent and child
    • Identify five core parental discourse markers that suggest increased risk for infant disorganized attachment
    • Identify five core parental behaviors that create increased risk for infant disorganized attachment
    • Identify strategies for effective intervention to strengthen early attachment
    • Apply a therapeutic response based on awareness of role of mirror neurons in communication
    • Identify transference and countertransference issues pertinent to infant mental health work
    • Describe how the clinician's own history can impact intervention
    • Describe concept of Parental Reflective Functioning
    • Describe how to listen for Reflective Functioning Develop skills to increase Parental Reflective Functioning Identify the role of parallel process in increasing Parental Reflective Functioning Identify ways to support and maintain Reflective Functioning as the therapist
    • Develop skills to increase Parental Reflective Functioning Identify the role of parallel process in increasing Parental Reflective Functioning Identify ways to support and maintain Reflective Functioning as the therapist
    hybrid course

    Sessions

    • 7/24/2020 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
    • 7/25/2020 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 5 regular asynchronous online
    • 8 regular live interactive online

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Instructor

    Location

    online
  10. Animal Assisted Therapy Introduction Experiential

    This workshop will start with an orientation webinar on Friday, September 11 from 2-5pm. The remainder of the course, which is primarily experiential, will meet at the instructor's farm in Dexter, Michigan on Saturday, September 12.

    This course provides an experiential opportunity for participants to explore animal-assisted therapeutic activities specifically designed to further a wide range of therapeutic goals with children, adolescents, families and adult clients. Like play therapy and art therapy, animal-assisted interventions, when integrated with evidence-based methods including (but not limited to) CBT and mindfulness, trauma recovery, family systems, cultural-relational and psychodynamic approaches, offer opportunities for people to work through a variety of issues and insecurities related to attachment, trauma, self-esteem and identity concerns, dysregulation, behavioral difficulties, mental illness, developmental disabilities, and family and relational problems. With selected animals as therapy partners, the therapeutic team helps people of all ages and positions foster new alliances, understand more fully existing problems and build practical life-skills to enhance confidence, effectiveness and joy. Presently, animal-assisted therapy is gaining acclaim in the field of mental health intervention and there is a growing body of evidence supporting its efficacy and standards in the field to be explored. This course introduces the theoretical foundations, standards, ethics, evidence, certifications, integration of methods, case examples, evaluation and practical skills involved in partnering with a variety of animals, in particular dogs, cats, goats, pigs, horses and chickens (yes, chickens!)- to provide engaging and effective interventions.

    Objectives

    • Identify key concepts in animal-assisted therapy.
    • Define terms associated with animal-assisted interventions.
    • Identify issues pertaining to experiential animal-assisted interventions in the therapeutic farm setting.
    • Identify key ethical and safety considerations associated with animal-assisted interventions through experiential exercises and discussion.
    • Describe considerations for entering into ethical relationships with animals that distinguish between animals as therapeutic partners vs. used as tools.
    • Apply personal skills such as self-awareness in animal activities that focus on engagement.
    • Apply clinical observational and assessment skills through small group and animal interactions.
    • Describe key roles and responsibilities in animal-assisted therapy.
    • Integrate evidence-based and best practice methods with animal-assisted interventions.
    • Apply animal-assisted challenge experiences in a group experiential exercise.
    hybrid course

    Sessions

    • 9/11/2020 2:00 PM to 5:00 PM
    • 9/12/2020 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 ethics synchronous interactive
    • 2 regular synchronous interactive
    • 7 regular face-to-face

    Skill Level

    Intermediate

    Instructor

    Location

    online

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