Contact My SSW Report Sexual Misconduct

Main menu

Continuing Education Course Catalog

Important Information

Search

  1. Higher Education Supports for Youth with Experience in Foster Care

    This session is focused how to support and facilitate academic success within higher education for students who have experienced foster care. Nationally about 50% of children who experience foster care will graduate high school and about 2-4% of those will earn a four year degree. This presentation will give an overview of educational outcomes as well as the barriers and unique needs of students who have experienced foster as well as strategies, tools, and resources that DHHS foster care workers and other supportive adults can use in their practice when working with young people navigating educational options.

    Objectives

    • Describe educational outcomes for foster youth.
    • Identify barriers for educational success for foster youth.
    • Identify resources and strategies to support children in foster care to increase educational success.
    face-to-face in-service training workshop

    Sessions

    • 2/7/2020 9:00 AM to 12:15 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 3 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 S University
    Ann Arbor
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: 1840 (ECC)
  2. Building Efficient Meetings and Producing Effective Decisions: Achieve Twice as Much in Half the Time

    This session shares results from the Meetings Masters/Decision Maestros Research Project intended to help social workers conduct more effective meetings. The first part of the session highlights practices from Meeting Masters, including the Menu Agenda, and the Agenda Bell. Principles of the Meeting Masters help social workers in the four phases of meeting - preplanning, facilitating/running the meeting itself, processing items for the next meeting, and follow up and implementation of decisions and actions. The second portion reviews several examples of "decision rottenosity" and outlines the process of decision crystallization.

    Objectives

    • Describe challenges in effectiveness that surface in meetings social workers routinely have, such as staff meetings, staff consultations, supervisory meetings, agency board meetings, etc.
    • Describe what occurs during the four phases of a meeting.
    • Develop an agenda for a staff meeting.
    face-to-face workshop/seminar

    Sessions

    • 3/12/2020 8:30 AM to 11:45 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 3 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: 3661
  3. Art and Design for Social Work, Social Justice and Social Change

    This course is aimed to create the following impacts on student learning: increased knowledge of the history of community based art and design in the US; increased knowledge of methods for collaborative community based art and design; develop skills in collaboration with community groups in developing community based art and design projects; Knowledge and skills to evaluate the impact of community based art and design activity.

    Our class is organized around principles of adragogy (adult learning), empowerment, and collaboration. We will develop a co­learning environment that will include presentations, skill building activities and exercises, speakers, and different media. Experiential activities will be central to the structure and process of this course.

    Objectives

    • Describe ways in which live and abstract art by women artists and artists of color addresses politics.
    • Analyze the public view of abstract art as a retreat from politics and protest - an abnegation of a commitment to civil rights and feminism.
    • Outline the history of community-based art and design in the US.
    • Describe methods for collaborative community based art and design through critical review of case histories and interviews with artists.
    • Apply model of socially-just practice in considering use of art and design for social change.
    • Apply model of ethical decision-making in considering art and design for social changes in communities and communal spaces.
    • Evaluate the impact of community based art and design activity.
    • Outline the history of live art.
    • Engage with live art in both embodied and analytical ways (as audience, artist, and scholar-historian).
    • Critically analyze ways in which artists' bodies are displayed, made vulnerable, and empowered.
    • Describe ways that performance art can challenge boundaries between audience/performer.
    • Identify potential ethical issues within live performance art.
    • Creatively reinterpret the work of an artist or movement covered in the course through a final public performance, commentary, or review.
    • Describe how live art responds to the social structures of its time.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 3/13/2020 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
    • 3/20/2020 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 ethics in-person
    • 12 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    TBD
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: B780
  4. Trauma or ADHD: Trauma Informed Tools for Working with ADHD

    ADHD is the most studied diagnosis of children and adults. This course will discuss the latest research findings, provide greater understanding of the effects ADHD has on the brain and how these effects are very similar to those left on the brain by traumatic experiences. We will discuss the spectrum of trauma, and how even small sometimes unnoticed brain injuries can cause symptoms comparable to those recognized as common ADHD symptoms. We will draw a clear connection between the spectrum of trauma and ADHD.

    In the second half of the 4 hour course we will focus on learning trauma informed practice skills to create a more effective setting for supportive treatment of individuals with ADHD and/or traumatic experiences. Using the research to guide our work we will discuss somatic awareness and tools to build safety for a positive healing environment. Giving participants the opportunity to gain tools and understanding around how to help clients who are struggling to understand their own behaviors.

    Objectives

    • Describe the trauma spectrum of events and how trauma affects our brain functionality.
    • Describe ADHD symptoms and how our brain functionality affects our ability to learn.
    • Explain why working in a trauma-informed way is more effective than a non-trauma-informed way when working with all clients.
    • Describe specific tools and skills to use with client with ADHD and/or trauma injuries.
    face-to-face workshop/seminar

    Sessions

    • 3/13/2020 8:30 AM to 12:30 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 4 regular in-person

    Instructor

    • Hillary M. Baldwin-Steller

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: 1840 (ECC)
  5. Philanthropy and Evaluation

    This mini-course will focus on issues of contemporary philanthropy and the ways in which both philanthropic entities and their grantees can evaluate the efficiency, effectiveness and impact of philanthropic investments.

    Objectives

    • Outline the history of philanthropy within the US.
    • Describe contemporary trends pertaining to philanthropy and learn how to develop a network of philanthropic partners.
    • Identify the various types of philanthropic organizations and current social media trends pertaining to philanthropy.
    • Locate foundations and access 990 forms to inform their selection of a foundation for application.
    • Describe considerations and criteria for selecting a foundation.
    • Describe investments trends from the individual to the organizational level.
    • Describe how foundations are using place-based and system-focused giving strategies as well as capacity-building investment.
    • Describe how various foundations approach evaluation and measurement of impact with their grantees.
    • Develop measureable indicators and locate standardized scales to measure participant impact.
    • Use a mission money matrix to better understand program financial sustainability and impact.
    • Describe three foundations and their approaches to building grantee evaluation capacity.
    • Develop a case study of a foundation that matches their area of interest.
    • Critically review grantee evaluation reports.
    • Describe career opportunities within philanthropy and as evaluation practitioners.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 3/14/2020 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
    • 3/21/2020 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 14 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    School of Social Work
    1080 South University
    TBD
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: B780
  6. Alumni Webinar Series: Financial Therapy -- What is it and how can it help your clients?

    Financial therapy is a relatively new hybrid between the worlds of personal finance professionals and mental health professionals. For social workers, learning more about personal finances in a way that goes above providing resources and advocating for clients is paramount. In this webinar, you'll learn how this specialty came to be and how it can help you personally and professionally.

    Note: This webinar is free for U-M SSW alumni.

    Objectives

    • Describe the importance of providing education to social workers on financial therapy.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 3/16/2020 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 regular synchronous interactive

    Instructor

    • Lindsay Bryan-Podvin

    Location

    online
    online
  7. Forensic Interviewing of Children

    This is an advanced methods mini-course focused on forensic interviewing of children. The mini-course is particularly relevant to interviewing children alleged to have been sexually abused, but also be relevant to gathering information from children about a spectrum of traumatic experiences. This mini-course will provide a critical review of the evidence/research that is relied upon in forensic interviewing of children and will provide information about best practice. The course takes a child-centered/social justice approach, will admonish professionals to take into account the child's needs, developmental stage, and functioning, as well as the specifics of the allegations, when conducting forensic interviews.

    This course will cover the following areas: 1) forensic versus clinical practice, 2) brief history of forensic interviewing, 3) models of assessing for child sexual abuse, 4) cultural issues that may impact abuse characteristics, reactions to abuse, and interviews with the child, 5) forensic interview structures, protocols, and guidelines, 6) controversies about appropriate questioning techniques and sequencing in a forensic interview, 7) controversies, relevant research, and best practice related to the use of media in forensic interviews, and 8) current practice regarding extended assessments in forensic work.

    Objectives

    • Describe the role of confidentiality in creating safe spaces for learning.
    • Describe how cultural factors may impact the assessment process.
    • Describe the difference between forensic and clinical work.
    • Identify models for evaluating an allegation of sexual abuse.
    • Apply models of evaluation to a case example.
    • Apply ethical decision-making and critical thinking models to case situations.
    • Describe current interview structures and the role of pain assessment.
    • Apply knowledge about interview structures to a case example.
    • Distinguish between appropriate and inappropriate questions/probes for forensic interviews.
    • Describe current controversies in questioning.
    • Describe how various media can be used to augment children's verbal statements, e.g. free drawings, anatomical drawings, shared paper.
    • Identify controversies related to use of media.
    • Describe how to use anatomical dolls through observing a demonstration. Engage in critical reflection of participant's own practice and incorporate key learnings.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 3/20/2020 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
    • 3/21/2020 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 ethics in-person
    • 1 pain management in-person
    • 11 regular in-person

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: B760
  8. Social Work Services That Make a Difference: Meaningful Supports for Transgender Youth and Their Families

    This course will offer a working definition of terms, including Transgender, Gender Identity, Gender Expression, Intersex, Gender Nonconforming, Non Binary, Intersex, Gender Transition, and Ally. Language and terminology will be examined with emphasis on using affirming language and avoiding offensive terminology.

    This course will examine multiple risk factors that impact transgender youth from a solution-focused lens. These risk factors include a 40- 50 percent rate of attempted suicide, increased incidence of homelessness, school bullying and harassment, increased vulnerability to hate crimes (including assault, sexual assault and murder). Family relationship dynamics, along with strategies to increase family support, will be explored with an emphasis on increasing parental capacity to support the transgender youth. Family acceptance is a protective factor that is associated with a decrease in transgender youth homeless and a decline in the frequency and severity of mental health issues and an increase in overall wellness. Strategies to support and build upon family and school connectedness will be examined in this mini course.

    This mini course will also examine be the specific concerns that apply to transgender children younger than age 13. Understanding gender identity at younger ages will be explored, along with specific facts about working within elementary and preschool setting, and offering long term guidance and planning recommendations to parents and children that are developmentally appropriate.

    The gender transition process will be reviewed.

    Objectives

    • Identify at least three risk factors facing transgender children and adolescents at home, school, and in the community.
    • Identify three or protective factors that positively impact outcomes for transgender clients.
    • Identify three intervention strategies to assist parents and other adult caregivers to support their children in the gender transition process.
    • Describe two ways to increase parental support of the transgender child, even in the face on parental resistance and will identify three strategies to increase parental support.
    • Identify at two strategies to implement to support transgender youth in schools.
    • Describe two strategies to implement to support and advocate for transgender youth in community settings.
    • Describe two strategies to implement to support transgender youth in social service agencies.
    • Use affirming language and terminology to describe trans and gender non-conforming children and youth.
    • Define intersex and describe how intersex differs from transgender.
    • Describe personal values with regard to transgender and gender non-conforming children and youth so any potential bias that may exist does not impede service delivery.
    • Identify the steps involved to legally change one's name and gender marker in conjunction with gender transition and how to attain these changes.
    • Describe two ways parents can take to support their younger child (under age 11) when a young child may identify as transgender or gender conforming.
    • Define gender dysphoria.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 3/23/2020 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 3/30/2020 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 4/6/2020 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 4/13/2020 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 4/20/2020 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 ethics face-to-face
    • 12 regular face-to-face

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: B780
  9. Wonder Woman: Practice and Ethical Considerations

    African American women have been identified as experiencing stress as individuals with intersections of non-dominant groups. The workshop will focus on identifying the triple oppression that is experienced and mythical labels created, resilience strategies and ethical considerations. Using the lens of Afrocentrism, we will explore the idea of the "wonder woman," the potential and future of Black women in the United States.

    Objectives

    • Define and provide examples of trauma.
    • Describe the relevance of historical trauma and the poverty, stress and community violence disproportionately observed in marginalized communities for traumatic stress.
    • Identify ethical considerations needed when working with African American women.
    • Identify 2 resilience strategies for individuals impacted by toxic stress.
    • List stereotypes and myths associated with Black women.
    • Identify three ways to modify treatment or practice to be responsive to the needs of marginalized communities.
    face-to-face workshop/seminar

    Sessions

    • 3/27/2020 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 ethics face-to-face
    • 5 regular face-to-face

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 S University Ave
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: 1840 (ECC)
  10. Working with Parents Coping with Mental Illness

    This part didactic, part experiential workshop will explore practices to engage with child welfare involved families with caregivers impacted by mental illness. It will explore common diagnostic criteria, what they mean, and how provider interactions can positively impact mental health for the better with engagement skills and strategies.

    Objectives

    • Describe the intersection between mental health and child welfare, and the impact that professionals have on child welfare-involved families.
    • Describe the common diagnosis and treatment that impact child welfare involved parents.
    • Identify engagement strategies that are strengths-based and trauma-informed, and implement those strategies in the work.
    face-to-face in-service training workshop

    Sessions

    • 4/10/2020 2:00 PM to 5:15 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 3 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: B780

Pages

Contact Us Press escape to close