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  1. Psychopharmacology for Social Workers

    This course has a clinical focus and practical orientation; therefore, we will examine basic neuropsychopharmacology, neurotransmitter systems, drug metabolism (i.e, absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion), and the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of psychotropic medications to only a limited degree. Our emphasis will be primarily on understanding the physiological actions, therapeutic effects, and potential toxicities associated with prescribed pharmacotherapies for major classes of mental disorders affecting youth, adults, and the elderly along with other special populations. Lastly, we will discuss ethical and legal issues, the social workers role in collaboration and communication with prescribing doctors and nurses.

    Objectives

    • Describe the principles of pharmacokinetics (what the body does to medication) and pharmacodynamics (what the medications do to the body) and be able to describe the main actions of psychotropic drugs in the central nervous system and identify the risks and benefits of psychotropic medications.
    • Describe the different psychotropic medication classifications and identify which medications are clinically indicated for different mental health or substance use disorders.
    • Articulate the physical differences and different medication consideration among different groups.
    • Identify and define the three core ethical standards of psychopharmacology practice for social workers.
    • Identify in a case example a client's diagnosis, what medication would be prescribed based on the diagnosis, and the benefits and risks/side effects of the prescribed medication.
    • Describe seven roles for social workers and psychopharmacology and identify three issues and three shared rewards regarding interdisciplinary collaboration between social workers and prescribing providers.
    Workshop

    Sessions

    • 12/7/2018 9am to 4pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 ethics face-to-face
    • 5 regular face-to-face

    Instructor

    • Julie D. Cushman

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: 1840 (ECC)

    Fees

    $120.00
  2. Pain, Effective Intervention, and the Opioid Crisis

    Pain is an often discussed experience that is not often well understood. This course equips the participant with a comprehensive overview of the different types of pain, and the variety of both medicinal and non-pharmacological interventions shown to be helpful in addressing conditions including the experience of pain. Historical and other contributing factors of the so-called "Opioid Epidemic" are also discussed.

    Objectives

    • Define 3 types of pain, examine the ways in which pain is a subjective experience, and distinguish how pain is impacted by multiple biopsychosocial factors.
    • Describe examples of medicinal and non-pharmacological interventions for treating pain, and cite risk factors that have contributed to the opioid epidemic.
    Asynchronous Webinar

    Sessions

    • self-paced

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 pain management asynchronous online

    Instructor

    Location

    online
    Online

    Fees

    $45.00
  3. Adventure/Experiential-Based Therapy

    This class will focus on the use of adventure-based activities in therapy with individuals, groups and families. Students will be introduced to adventure through readings, discussions, guest speakers and experiences. This one credit mini-course is designed to provide the student with a theoretical, philosophical and experiential understanding of adventure and experiential learning and its application to therapy. Course content includes the theoretical and philosophical foundations of adventure based practice, a discourse on the safe and appropriate use of adventure activities with different client groups, a demonstration on facilitating adventure activities, and use of adventure activities in assessment and intervention.

    Objectives

    • Describe how adventure and experiential activities can be utilized in therapy.
    • Adapt adventure tools for use indoors, particularly in small office settings.
    • Identify at least two ethical concerns related to Adventure Therapy.
    • Demonstrate an ability to practice within one's scope of practice and training.
    • Illustrate a level of familiarity with adventure and experiential therapy of specific relevance to the student.
    • Describe how to adapt activities contingent on developmental and psychological considerations.
    • Apply a facilitation model for adventure and experiential practice.
    • Describe an experiential approach to addressing resistance.
    • Describe the theory behind adventure and experiential practice and therapy.
    • Develop activities for their intentional use with specific clients and client populations.
    • Distinguish between Adventure Practice, Experiential Practice and Adventure Therapy.
    • Describe effective use of self with regard to adventure practice and therapy.
    • Identify ways to make the adventure/experiential approach more accessible to all ability levels.
    • Identify ways in which this approach can be adapted to accommodate for client diversity.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 1/12/2019 9am to 5pm
    • 1/25/2019 9am to 5pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 14 regular face-to-face

    Location

    University of Michigan School of Social Work
    1080 South University Ave.
    TBD
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

    Fees

    $265.00
  4. Women in Leadership

    Evidence suggests that women face unique leadership challenges. Marginalization based on gender, family and work priorities, and societal expectations create a system that hinders the maximization of leadership potential. In addition, women bring diverse capabilities and hold unique characteristics in the work world today. Community benefit organizations must leverage this diversity of leadership to improve decision making, tap into diverse points of view, and inspire social change.
    This course will examine the social, structural and personal dynamics that differentially impact women and men as leaders. It will prepare all students to identify and harness the specific needs and capabilities of women. It will provide the knowledge and skills to succeed and contribute added value in their roles as leaders at any level.

    Objectives

    • Differentiate between leadership and management.
    • Identify the levels of leadership.
    • Compare and contrast models of leadership.
    • Describe qualities of leaders at all levels of leadership.
    • Examine personal strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats.
    • Examine barriers faced by women and ethical responsibilities associated with women in social work.
    • Define "impostor syndrome" and describe its attributes.
    • List ways to assist other women in breaking down barriers to inclusion and advancement.
    • Identify personal values pertaining to leadership.
    • Differentiate strategies of change.
    • Develop a personal action plan for ongoing professional development.
    • Use critical thinking skills to develop personal plan to develop leadership skills.
    • Identify women in leadership roles, their unique traits and values.
    • Compare and contrast personal values with the NASW Code of Ethics.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 1/12/2019 9am to 5pm
    • 1/19/2019 9am to 5pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 ethics in-person
    • 11 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

    Fees

    $265.00
  5. Using Photovoice for Individual and Community Empowerment

    Photovoice is a process in which people typically those with limited power due to poverty, language barriers, race, class, ethnicity, gender, culture, or other circumstances use video or photo images to document their environment and experiences and share them with others. It uses visual methods to communicate lived experience and to create a basis for discussion and action. The images are often used, with captions composed by the photographers, to bring the realities of the photographers lives home to the public and policy makers and to spur change. However, PhotoVoice can also be a method used direct practice, evaluation, and management settings.

    This mini-course will cover basic methods for using Photovoice methods with individuals, groups, and communities. The course will provide an overview of the method and its application in different contexts, both domestic and intergernational, and how visual images can be a powerful form for communication. This section of the class will include a walk through the School of Social Work's collection of documentary photography. The ethical dimensions of this method will also be covered. The remainder of the class will teach methods for photovoice and engage students in their own photovoice project. We will end with an exhibit of photos from the course that will take place in our School of Social Work.


    Relevant core competencies:

    Values & Ethics: Demonstrates how value base, ethical standards, and principles of the social work profession are applied to practice.

    Critical Thinking: Actively and skillfully conceptualizing, applying, analyzing,synthesizing, and/or evaluating information gathered from, or generated by, observation, experience, reflection, reasoning, or communication.

    Assessment: Applying assessment strategies and other data collection methods.

    Objectives

    • Define Photovoice.
    • Describe the utility of Photovoice in clinical practice settings.
    • Describe the utility of Photovoice in macro practice settings.
    • Outline methods for documentary photography.
    • Identify ethical issues related to using photographs in practice.
    • Describe approaches for facilitating groups to identify themes and goals.
    • Apply skills in completion of Photovoice assignment.
    • Develop skills in presenting and describing their photographic images.
    • Develop skills in facilitating reflective discussions.
    • Explain the importance of reflection in the PhotoVoice method.
    • Apply learning through writing PhotoVoice narratives.
    • Identify different approaches to displaying PhotoVoice images.
    • Describe methods for matting and mounting photographic images.
    • Describe methods for presenting and hanging a PhotoVoice display.
    • Apply Photovoice by creating a display in the community and engaging stakeholders.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 1/24/2019 5pm to 8pm
    • 2/21/2019 5pm to 8pm
    • 3/14/2019 5pm to 8pm
    • 3/28/2019 5pm to 8pm
    • 4-11-2019 5pm to 8pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 ethics in-person
    • 14 regular in-person

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    4706
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

    Fees

    $265.00
  6. Treating with Equity: LGBTQIA+ Inclusivity in Healthcare (Webinar)

    Doctors, nurses, psychologists, physical therapists, front office staff, and everyone else in the medical field interact with members of the LGBTQIA+ community on a regular basis, yet members of this community are more likely to be refused health care, be blamed for their medical issues due to their identities, and often choose to avoid health care settings due to these issues. This workshop supports providers on how to make health care settings more inclusive, providing training on the language relating to the LGBTQIA+ community, and help medical professionals optimize their workplaces into somewhere welcoming to all those needing health care.

    Objectives

    • Describe issues facing the LGBTQIA+ community when accessing a variety of healthcare.
    • Develop a plan for how to make practice more inclusive of the LGBTQIA+ community now and in the future.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 1/25/2019 12:00pm to 2pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 regular synchronous interactive

    Location

    Treating with Equity: LGBTQIA+ Inclusivity in Healthcare
    1080 S. University Ave
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

    Fees

    $45.00
  7. Navigating Ethical Challenges for Social Work Online (Webinar)

    Professional social workers need to develop effective personal and professional strategies to effectively address ethical issues and challenges related to the use of social media in their practice. This webinar will utilize the 2017 NASW, ASWB, CSWE, and CSWA Standards for Technology in Social Work Practice and the NASW Code of Ethics to assist participants in exploring practice implications related to online networking (ON) and social media use. Participants will explore core ethical concepts that guide practice and define their personal and professional responsibilities with regard to risk management, as well as help them discover the benefits of sound agency policies related to the ethical use of ON and social media.

    Objectives

    • Interpret and apply the 2017 NASW, ASWB, CSWE, and CSWA Standards for Technology in Social Work Practice to ethical issues in personal and professional use of online networking.
    • Identify opportunities for organizational risk management that address ethical social media use.
    Webinar

    Sessions

    • 1/31/2019 12:00pm to 2pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 ethics synchronous interactive

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

    Fees

    $45.00
  8. Art and Design for Community Change

    This course is aimed to create the following impacts on student learning: increased knowledge of the history of community based art and design in the US; increased knowledge of methods for collaborative community based art and design; develop skills in collaboration with community groups in developing community based art and design projects; Knowledge and skills to evaluate the impact of community based art and design activity.

    Our class is organized around principles of adragogy (adult learning), empowerment, and collaboration. We will develop a co-­learning environment that will include presentations, skill building activities and exercises, speakers, and different media. Experiential activities will be central to the structure and process of this course.

    Objectives

    • Describe ways in which live and abstract art by women artists and artists of color addresses politics.
    • Analyze the public view of abstract art as a retreat from politics and protest - an abnegation of a commitment to civil rights and feminism.
    • Outline the history of community-based art and design in the US.
    • Describe methods for collaborative community based art and design through critical review of case histories and interviews with artists.
    • Apply model of socially-just practice in considering use of art and design for social change.
    • Apply model of ethical decision-making in considering art and design for social changes in communities and communal spaces.
    • Evaluate the impact of community based art and design activity.
    • Outline the history of live art.
    • Engage with live art in both embodied and analytical ways (as audience, artist, and scholar-historian).
    • Critically analyze ways in which artists' bodies are displayed, made vulnerable, and empowered.
    • Describe ways that performance art can challenge boundaries between audience/performer.
    • Identify potential ethical issues within live performance art.
    • Creatively reinterpret the work of an artist or movement covered in the course through a final public performance, commentary, or review.
    • Describe how live art responds to the social structures of its time.
    • Describe three overarching issues for the future use of art and design for social change.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 2/1/2019 9am to 5pm
    • 2/8/2019 9am to 5pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 ethics in-person
    • 12 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    Art and Design for Community Change
    1080 S. University
    TBD
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

    Fees

    $265.00
  9. Family Psychoeducation Intervention in Work with Adults, Adolescents, Children and Their Families/Extended Support Networks

    This course will focus on developing the group work skills necessary to implement evidence-based family psychoeducation interventions in work with adults, adolescents, children and their families. Special emphasis will be given to the family psychoeducation approach using multiple family groups in the treatment of severe psychiatric disorders. This course will examine the theoretical and empirical foundations for family psychoeducation, as well as, the practice of multifamily group treatment in schizophrenia, bi-polar illness, major depressive disorder, borderline personality disorder and with children and adolescents with serious mental illnesses.

    Objectives

    • Describe the psycho-biology of schizophrenia, the effects of the illness on the individual and the family.
    • Identify coping strategies to share with families and people with schizophrenia.
    • Apply the problem solving method and other FPE techniques to help run or start a group.
    • Describe the efficacy of FPE and how it is different from standard treatment for schizophrenia.
    • List other illnesses/disabilities FPE has been used with.
    • Describe the concept of high expressed emotion, how it effects patients with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, and how FPE attempts to change those behaviors.
    • Describe the psycho-biology and bio-social impact of bipolar disorder.
    • Describe how McFarlane's Family Psychoeducation method is used with bipolar disorder.
    • Describe how Family Focused Treatment, another EBP used with bipolar disorder, compares and contrasts with McFarlane's Family Psychoeducation method as it is used with bipolar disorder.
    • Describe how Family Psychoeducation has been used in other countries, and with minority cultures inside the U.S. Describe the effectiveness and modifications that were necessary to make it effective in other cultural contexts.
    • Identify the Family Psychoeducation (FPE) Family Guidelines for schizophrenia, and describe how they are used with families.
    • Identify the principles for interacting with people with schizophrenia based on the psychobiology of that illness.
    • Identify the Family Psychoeducation (FPE) Family Guidelines for bipolar disorder, and how they are used with families.
    • Identify high expressed emotion in families. Describe how Family Focused Treatment attempts to assess and change high expressed emotion in families with a bipolar disorder. Describe Social Rhythm Theory and how family and other daily routines, or change in/lack of them, can impact the course of bipolar disorder.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 2/2/2019 9am to 5pm
    • 2/9/2019 9am to 5pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 14 regular face-to-face

    Instructor

    • James Svensson

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

    Fees

    $265.00
  10. Creating Resilient Communities: Your Role

    This workshop will introduce participants to the Adverse Childhood Experience study. By highlighting the impact of adverse childhood experiences and toxic stress, participants will be able to identify how specific experiences impact the health and social behaviors of individuals.

    Michigan ACE's Initiative seeks to share invaluable information about the implications of ACE's in our communities as well strategies for prevention and healing.

    Toxic stress experiences by members of target groups will be discussed. Resiliency strategies that professionals and community members can utilize to positively improve outcomes for children and families will be explored.

    Objectives

    • Identify three categories of adverse childhood experiences.
    • Describe two ethical considerations and obligations for providing services to individuals that experience toxic stress and adverse childhood experiences.
    • Identify two resiliency strategies to utilize with children and families experiencing toxic stress.
    In-Service Training

    Sessions

    • 2/8/2019 9am to 12:15pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 ethics face-to-face
    • 2 regular face-to-face

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

    Fees

    $65.00

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