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  1. Building a Social Justice Informed Private Practice | Part 1: Foundation

    This workshop is part one of a four-part series on social justice oriented approaches to offering private behavioral health services in a private practice setting. This section outlines the basic knowledge foundation social workers need to prepare to offer private outpatient behavioral health services. While we encourage participants to complete all four parts, you may also select those that best fit your needs and schedule.

    This series will provide a foundational understanding of private and public behavioral health services so that participants are able to identify the skills needed to deliver outpatient services as a clinician with a social justice orientation. With increased access to behavioral health services through policies such as Health Care Parity and the Affordable Care Act, more community members with mild to moderate need for behavioral health services are seeking care and there is a greater need for non-public behavioral health care providers who deliver culturally-responsive and socially-just services.

    Objectives

    • Define non-public behavioral health services.
    • Define public behavioral health services.
    • Describe the core values of social work and relevance to behavioral health
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 5/20/2021 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 ethics synchronous interactive
    • 1.75 regular synchronous interactive

    Skill Level

    Intermediate

    Instructors

    Location

    online
  2. Building a Social Justice Informed Private Practice | Part 2: Skills

    This workshop is part two of a four-part series on social justice oriented approaches to offering private behavioral health services in a private practice setting. This section focuses on skills for outpatient behavioral health services. While we encourage participants to complete all four parts, you may also select those that best fit your needs and schedule.

    This course will provide a foundational understanding of private and public behavioral health services so that participants are able to identify the skills needed to deliver outpatient services as a clinician with a social justice orientation. With increased access to behavioral health services through policies such as Health Care Parity and the Affordable Care Act, more community members with mild to moderate need for behavioral health services are seeking care and there is a greater need for non-public behavioral health care providers who deliver culturally-responsive and socially-just services.

    Objectives

    • Identify skills needed to deliver outpatient behavioral health services in private settings.
    • Describe one's personal philosophy to service delivery.
    • Compare and contrast needs and wants of clients presenting for service delivery.
    • Identify at least one ethical standard relevant to social justice and outpatient behavioral health services.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 5/20/2021 1:00 PM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1.75 ethics synchronous interactive
    • 2 regular synchronous interactive

    Skill Level

    Intermediate

    Instructors

    Location

    online
  3. Building a Social Justice Informed Private Practice | Part 3: Practice Strategies

    This workshop is part three of a four-part series on social justice oriented approaches to offering private behavioral health services in a private practice setting. This section focuses on practice strategies. While we encourage participants to complete all four parts, you may also select those that best fit your needs and schedule.

    This series will provide a foundational understanding of private and public behavioral health services so that participants are able to identify the skills needed to deliver outpatient services as a clinician with a social justice orientation. With increased access to behavioral health services through policies such as Health Care Parity and the Affordable Care Act, more community members with mild to moderate need for behavioral health services are seeking care and there is a greater need for non-public behavioral health care providers who deliver culturally-responsive and socially-just services.

    Objectives

    • Identify social work core competencies.
    • Describe two tools and strategies to integrate to demonstrate socially just practice.
    • Describe the role of clinician in private outpatient setting as a social worker.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 5/21/2021 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2.75 regular synchronous interactive

    Skill Level

    Intermediate

    Instructors

    Location

    online
  4. Building a Social Justice Informed Private Practice | Part 4: Business Strategies

    This workshop is part four of a four-part series on social justice oriented approaches to offering private behavioral health services in a private practice setting. This section focuses on business strategies. While we encourage participants to complete all four parts, you may also select those that best fit your needs and schedule.

    This series will provide a foundational understanding of private and public behavioral health services so that participants are able to identify the skills needed to deliver outpatient services as a clinician with a social justice orientation. With increased access to behavioral health services through policies such as Health Care Parity and the Affordable Care Act, more community members with mild to moderate need for behavioral health services are seeking care and there is a greater need for non-public behavioral health care providers who deliver culturally-responsive and socially-just services.

    Objectives

    • Identify funding sources for private behavioral health services.
    • Describe the credentialing process for Michigan state insurance plans.
    • Identify three strategies for sharing information about services delivered.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 5/21/2021 1:00 PM to 4:15 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 3 regular synchronous interactive

    Skill Level

    Intermediate

    Instructors

    Location

    online
  5. Financial Sustainability and Social Justice in Private Practice

    Over 85% of clinical mental health services are delivered by licensed social workers. This work occurs in a variety of settings including private practice. Building a business that maintains the social work ethical code of delivering services in a manner accessible to all populations is key to socially-just work in private practice. This course will address developing a budget that allows for ethical, socially-just mental health service and ensuring a reliable income as a clinician in private practice. This course will explore who is included and excluded when we select to panel with specific insurance plans. An overview of the process of insurance paneling and information required to begin the process will be presented.

    Objectives

    • Identify specific strategies for increasing access to mental health services for those groups who have historically not had access.
    • Define sustainable practice and create professional budgets that consider social justice models.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 6/3/2021 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 regular live interactive online

    Skill Level

    Intermediate

    Instructors

    Location

    online
  6. Certificate in Mixed Methods Research

    Part 1: This program area will welcome participants to the MMR CE program and introduce mixed methods research to them. Research ethics and values are important for the responsible conduct of research and so in the components of this program area, participants will learn about the nature of research ethics as it pertains to macro social work and other applied professions. We will begin with a history of research ethics with topics ranging from the Nuremberg Code and the Belmont Report, to the U.S. Public Health Service syphilis study carried out in Tuskegee, Alabama. Next, we will briefly cover theoretical frameworks and the advantages of using theory for mixed methods research and practice in social work. Participants will be challenged to view the research process through a culturally sensitive lens. Finally, participants will have an opportunity to think about the implications for how the research we conduct with underserved and underrepresented groups influences what we learn from these groups.

    Part 2: This program area will cover the basics for how to design a mixed methods research study. We will begin by discussing how to develop research questions, then we will cover mixed methods language and notation, and then we will discuss choosing a mixed methods design. The research question is one of the most important aspects of any research project. It influences subsequent aspects of the project. In this program area, participants will be guided through how to develop a research question based on their phenomenon of interest. This is important because researchers make decisions about whether they will use qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods after finalizing their research question. Communicating research designs throughout various stages of the planning, implementation, evaluation, and reporting of the project will also be covered. Then, this program area will cover transformative mixed methods, which are germane to the social justice lens of the social work profession.

    Part 3: This program area will cover collecting data in mixed methods research. We will begin by discussing how to decide on the data collection needed to address certain research questions. Next, participants will be guided through how sampling plans are developed and recruitment strategies are made. Then, various qualitative and quantitative data collection methods will be discussed and presented in the context of their contribution to a mixed methods study. For example, qualitative data can access a phenomenon more directly than what is possible with formal, questionnaire-based measurements in part because pre-established questions are sometimes insensitive to important local cultural norms and idioms. Qualitative data, in focusing on natural language, deepen our understanding of the clients condition, clinician attribution of symptoms, and other treatment processes otherwise inaccessible to scientific analysis. This type of data is particularly useful in characterizing areas where formal measurement tools are lacking, inappropriate, unreliable, or incomplete. For social workers and other applied professionals, the human voice can be one of the most valuable insights into learning and improving the outcomes of clients. Therefore, it is important to incorporate and properly use qualitative research in our work. In this program area, participants will learn effective and efficient ways to collect and analyze qualitative data using one-on-one interviews, focus groups, and observation data collection methods. Existing records will also be discussed. Quantitative data (e.g., statistics) can sometimes be intimidating for social workers and other applied professionals. In this program area, participants will deepen their understanding of the ways in which quantitative data is collected.

    Part 4: This program area will cover data analysis techniques for mixed methods studies. First, we will discuss how to prepare qualitative and quantitative data for analysis, and then we will describe various ways to code and analyze qualitative data, as well as the most appropriate statistical techniques for quantitative data. Qualitative approaches promise to bridge the explanatory gap that exists between aggregated outcomes and actual events in the local situation. On the other hand, quantitative approaches promise the opportunity for true experimental designs as well as replication of study methods and generalization of findings. We will also cover secondary analysis, and how to use existing statistics to address research questions. Since the purpose of statistics is to convey meaning about how certain variables (e.g., the independent and dependent) do or do not (and to what level) relate to each other, this program area will provide participants with a user-friendly way of incorporating statistics into their work. Though descriptive and inferential statistics will be covered, it is important for participants to note that advanced statistical methods (e.g., structural equation modeling, hierarchical linear modeling) will not be covered. This program area will cover how to take the interpretation of mixed methods research a step further by preparing reports from mixed methods research studies. During this program area, we will also cover ways to comprehensively represent large and small qualitative datasets involving multiple cases both for inductive exploration and for more deductive examination of theoretically interesting relationships among data concepts and other variables. Communicating the research process is probably the most important step in any research project. In this program area, participants will learn about writing research reports, manuscripts for peer-reviewed journals, research briefs, and longer reports. Visual displays of mixed methods research results will also be discussed. The program will also cover the benefits and challenges of different ways of disseminating mixed methods research findings. Participants will be encouraged to consider how the factors that influence the dissemination of research findings influence how they approach their research. As social workers and applied professionals, we should not take information for granted based on its popularity or reputation. In this program area, participants will learn how to apply critical appraisal skills in the search for evidence and during professional judgment and decision-making. Participants will also develop and strengthen skills and knowledge related to the identification of quality research. Participants will be encouraged to consider the concrete ways in which their own work reflects rigor and quality. The program will also briefly address using mixed methods in program evaluation and across disciplines.

    Asynchronous = Pre-recorded lectures: The pre-recorded lectures support the live sessions for the Mixed Methods Certificate. The recordings focus on content relevant to designing and implementing a mixed methods research approach in social work. The recordings involve participants in learning about core concepts and applications.

    Objectives

    • Describe ethics and values in social work research.
    • Identify ways to incorporate theory into social work research.
    • Describe mixed methods research.
    • Describe how mixed methods can be applied to social work research.
    • Describe why mixed methods should be conducted in social work research.
    • Name the key aspects of a mixed methods study.
    • Describe the steps involved with choosing the qualitative methods for a mixed methods study.
    • Describe the steps involved with choosing the quantitative methods for a mixed methods study.
    • Describe the steps involved with analyzing the data associated with qualitative methods for a mixed methods study.
    • Describe the steps involved with analyzing the data associated with quantitative methods for a mixed methods study.
    • Write up a mixed methods research study for social work practice.
    • Outline the history of mixed methods research ethics and the responsible conduct of research.
    • Describe the origins and purpose of mixed methods research.
    • Describe the importance of theory in conducting responsible mixed methods research.
    • Describe the implications for how the research we conduct with underserved and underrepresented groups influences what we learn from these groups.
    • Identify under what conditions someone should consider conducting a mixed methods study.
    • Describe the language and notation used in mixed methods research
    • Outline the procedures involved with choosing a mixed methods design.
    • Describe the challenges that may occur when choosing a mixed methods design.
    • Identify under what conditions quantitative and qualitative data should be collected.
    • Describe the conceptualization and operationalization of quantitative and qualitative research.
    • Describe measurement and sampling in quantitative and qualitative research studies.
    • Determine which descriptive and inferential analytic strategies should be used to analyze quantitative data and which inductive reasoning needs to be used to analyze qualitative data.
    • Describe ways to analyze qualitative data for mixed methods research projects
    • Describe ways to analyze quantitative data for mixed methods research projects
    • Describe the various ways the quantitative and qualitative data from mixed methods projects can be integrated to address a phenomenon.
    • Identify mixed methods projects in social work that can be interpreted to address a phenomenon.
    • Describe ways to disseminate qualitative data in mixed methods research
    • Describe ways to disseminate quantitative data in mixed methods research
    • Demonstrate successful writing strategies for mixed methods data in various settings. Identify ways to visually display mixed methods data in various settings.
    hybrid certificate program

    Sessions

    • 6/7/2021 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 6/9/2021 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 6/14/2021 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 6/16/2021 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 6/21/2021 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 6/23/2021 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 6/28/2021 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 6/30/2021 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 16 regular synchronous interactive
    • 14 regular asynchronous online

    Skill Level

    Intermediate

    Instructor

    Location

    online
  7. Suicide Risk Assessment and Safety Planning

    Suicide is a leading cause of preventable death in the United States and worldwide. Nearly 50% of individuals who end life by suicide see a primary care provider within a month of death, yet suicide risk assessment and treatment is consistently difficult in practice. With the majority of mental health services in the US being delivered by social workers, it is imperative that risk assessment and safety planning knowledge and skills are in place for our work with clients with the ultimate goal being to prevent premature suicidal death.

    This webinar will discuss and present on suicide as public health issue in the US, risk and protective factors, warning signs, barriers to help-seeking, risk assessment process and risk formulation, safety planning, and cultural humility in risk assessment with use of a clinical case. This workshop is also focused on the adult population.

    Objectives

    • Describe one risk and one protective factor of suicide.
    • Name and describe one aspect of suicide risk assessment.
    • Name and describe one step of suicide safety planning.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 6/11/2021 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 3 regular live interactive online

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Location

    online
  8. Broadening Your Outreach: Inclusive Marketing for Private Practice

    Reaching under-served populations is a core value of social work. Marketing, networking, sharing professional identity and creating a social media presence are integral elements of a private practice that reaches a diverse client base. Understanding the mental health needs of your community and approaching the community in a safe, accessible and approachable manner is key to building a socially-just private practice. This webinar will explore different avenues of creating accessible marketing to reach clients and strategies for creating a clinical network to expand outreach and referrals.

    Objectives

    • Define one's strengths as a social worker and create a professional biography that addresses social justice-informed practice.
    • Identify key elements of clinical networking that provides extensive outreach and referrals for diverse clients in their practice community.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 6/17/2021 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 ethics live interactive online
    • 1 regular live interactive online

    Skill Level

    Intermediate

    Instructors

    Location

    online
  9. Two-Way Street to Safe Communities: Law Enforcement and Social Work

    Interprofessional education involves the ability to work with other professionals, gaining an understanding of roles, developing relationships, and increasing effective communication to achieve goals that support community members. Social concerns about the safety of communities have led to a reimagining of the ways professionals work together to advance social justice. This workshop attempts to have initial exposure and preparation for collaboration between law enforcement and social work professionals.

    Objectives

    • Identify the professional standards of two professions.
    • Identify personal implicit and explicit bias' about the roles of other professionals.
    • Describe the ethical obligation for social workers to collaborate with law enforcement.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 6/25/2021 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 ethics synchronous interactive
    • 2 regular synchronous interactive

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Instructor

    Location

    online
  10. Increasing Access to Services in Private Practice

    This webinar will explore the specific areas of design and influence that will allow a private practice to become increasingly accessible and informed by the values of social justice. The workshop will address a variety of concerns expressed by marginalized groups when seeking mental health care. We will also define the goals of mental healthcare and availability of well-being services are often limited by SES and access to services. Case studies will illustrate examples of private practice outreach and service delivery that increases response to community need.

    Objectives

    • Identify factors that increase/decrease access to services including issues of location, safety, language, engagement and more.
    • Identify specific management and financial principles to ensure private practices are both sustainable/profitable and ethical in social justice mission.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 7/8/2021 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 ethics live interactive online
    • 1 regular live interactive online

    Skill Level

    Intermediate

    Instructors

    Location

    online

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