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  1. Social Work Practice in the Era of Fake News

    The term "post-truth," the Oxford Dictionaries 2016 Word of the Year, reflects an era where everyone is a few clicks away from information that supports any goal, belief, or outcome desired whether or not that information is factual. Evaluating information and recognizing "fake news" is a critical skill for everyone. For social workers, advocates, policy makers, and others responsible for human well-being, it's essential to find reliable data and other evidence to promote best practice and avoid the dangers of inaccurate information. Skill in locating and evaluating information can also help a practitioner work with clients and others who bring incorrect information into an interaction. This mini-course will address the following:

    - Understanding the phenomenon of fake news in the information landscape
    - Building strategies for spotting fake news
    - Addressing best approaches to locate "real" news
    - Learning how to fact-check data and statistics
    - Ways in which information is organized, structured, and delivered to support the dominant social narratives in the U.S.

    Objectives

    • Describe how people acquire and retain information.
    • Define terminology used in the course.
    • Describe strategies for locating credible sources.
    • To continue building skills and strategies for locating credible sources at a more nuanced level.
    • Describe the origins of "fake news" and how it enters our awareness.
    • Critique information that appears as data.
    • Critique visual displays of information.
    • Describe how algorithms work and where they can become problematic.
    • Describe information marketing and surveillance capitalism.
    • Describe dominant social narratives and how privilege plays into our understanding of and access to information.
    • Analyze and evaluate how privilege and dominant social narratives affect the news we see and don't see.
    • Assess the role of publishers, web builders, and other producers of information in the creation of our news environment.
    • Outline strategies for communicating respectfully against fake news.
    • Describe strategies for challenging misinformation.
    • Apply communication strategies to specific types of interactions and how to work within those scenarios (e.g. talking with a client, funder, supervisor, politician).
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 10/2/2019 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 10/9/2019 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 10/16/2019 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 10/23/2019 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 10/30/2019 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 15 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
  2. Higher Education Supports for Youth with Experience in Foster Care

    This session is focused how to support and facilitate academic success within higher education for students who have experienced foster care. Nationally about 50% of children who experience foster care will graduate high school and about 2-4% of those will earn a four year degree. This presentation will give an overview of educational outcomes as well as the barriers and unique needs of students who have experienced foster as well as strategies, tools, and resources that DHHS foster care workers and other supportive adults can use in their practice when working with young people navigating educational options.

    Objectives

    • Describe educational outcomes for foster youth.
    • Identify barriers for educational success for foster youth.
    • Identify resources and strategies to support children in foster care to increase educational success.
    face-to-face in-service training workshop

    Sessions

    • 10/3/2019 9:00 AM to 12:15 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 3 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 S University
    Ann Arbor
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: 1840 (ECC)
  3. Working with Couples in Therapy

    This mini-course is designed to familiarize students with the current theories of couple therapy. Selected empirically supported models utilized in couple therapy will be examined The course also looks at some of the key issues and challenges faced by therapists who provide couple therapy. This mini-course will be skill based and focus on helping students to learn effective approaches to working with couples in therapy.

    Objectives

    • Identify current theories of couples therapy.
    • Describe empirically supported models (especially for depression and other mental disorders) utilized in couple therapy in terms of their concepts of health assumptions, goals, assessment features, diversity factors and interventions.
    • Identify key issues and challenges faced by therapists who provide couple therapy.
    • Engage in skill-based activities to promote application of couple therapy interventions.
    • Describe the basics of a couple evaluation so that the participant will feel more comfortable meeting with a couple in a variety of settings.
    • Identify the indictions and contraindications for doing couple therapy.
    • Identify at least two couples therapy models and learn how and when to integrate models.
    • Describe how to decide which model is the most appropriate for the clinical situation.
    • Describe the role of neutrality and skills that work to foster neutrality.
    • Describe the role of class, ethnicity and race in evaluating and treating couples.
    • Identify treatment approaches for working with same-sex couples and gender.
    • Describe prevention models and role of psychoeducation.
    • Describe how to handle high-conflict couples.
    • Describe special needs of couples who are in a "step-family."
    • Describe the role of therapist and how to address countertransference and bias in treatment.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 10/3/2019 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 10/10/2019 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 10/17/2019 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 10/24/2019 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 10/31/2019 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 15 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    University of Michigan School of Social Work
    1080 South University Ave.
    TBD
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
  4. Alumni Webinar Series: Collaborating Across Boundaries

    This webinar, taught by SSW alumnus Russ Linden, describes the practice of collaboration through the lens of two case examples in which collaborative leaders overcame enormous barriers in pursuit of their shared goals.

    We discuss the nature of collaborative leadership, six key factors that promote collaboration, and how to address many collaboration hurdles.

    Note: This webinar is free for U-M SSW alumni.

    Objectives

    • Identify 5 characteristics of effective collaborative leaders.
    • Describe 6 key factors that support successful collaboration.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 10/4/2019 3:00 PM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 regular live interactive online

    Instructor

    • Russell M Linden

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
  5. Immigration Enforcement, Human Rights, and Social Justice

    This mini-course focuses on the real community and personal impact of a public policy with sweeping national controversy, many deaths, and significant questions about social justice, racial discrimination, and even intent in the constitution. Because it is a mini-course, rather than a full course, this course will concentrate on one aspect of immigration policy? undocumented immigrants and the public policy strategy of enforcement for undocumented immigrants at the border and in the interior of the country. Along with discussion of the policies and practices of enforcement, we will bring local enforcement activities to the table and examine their impact on people, families, and Michigan communities. The discussion will have a global, national, state, and a local component. Students in this course will acquire the skills to critically analyze this aspect of immigration policy and its controversies. and about community and organization responses and activism.

    Objectives

    • Identify and assess the language, intent, and extent of enforcement policies, the strategies and tactics of enforcement, and government entities related to enforcement.
    • Analyze the economic, social, and health impact of enforcement on individuals, families and communities.
    • Apply immigrant rights information effectively in community organizing and other activism.
    • Describe the history, causes, and consequences of undocumented immigration.
    • Identify personal attitudes and knowledge regarding immigrant populations and immigration issues.
    • Outline the history of immigration policy.
    • Describe the impact of increased immigration enforcement on the local Latino immigrant community, including the implications of being within 100 miles of the northern US border.
    • Identify implications of the largest immigration raid in the country.
    • Describe controversies related to the development of the Department of Homeland Security.
    • Explain the facts and controversies related to increased border enforcement at the southern border, toward awareness.
    • Identify social work and advocacy interventions at the southern border to protect migrant populations.
    • Engage with people who have been affected by increased immigration enforcement.
    • Describe recent (last 10 years) immigration policy reform efforts.
    • Identify core principles of humane immigration reform. Identify examples of advocacy efforts to create positive changes in local policies affecting undocumented immigrant populations, i.e. local police, city resolutions, tuition equality, etc. Know the ethical and legal responsibilities of social workers in interfacing with people who are undocumented immigrants.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 10/5/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
    • 10/6/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 14 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    TBD
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: TBD
  6. Philanthropy and Evaluation

    This mini-course will focus on issues of contemporary philanthropy and the ways in which both philanthropic entities and their grantees can evaluate the efficiency, effectiveness and impact of philanthropic investments.

    Objectives

    • Outline the history of philanthropy within the US.
    • Describe contemporary trends pertaining to philanthropy and learn how to develop a network of philanthropic partners.
    • Identify the various types of philanthropic organizations and current social media trends pertaining to philanthropy.
    • Locate foundations and access 990 forms to inform their selection of a foundation for application.
    • Describe considerations and criteria for selecting a foundation.
    • Describe investments trends from the individual to the organizational level.
    • Describe how foundations are using place-based and system-focused giving strategies as well as capacity-building investment.
    • Describe how various foundations approach evaluation and measurement of impact with their grantees.
    • Develop measureable indicators and locate standardized scales to measure participant impact.
    • Use a mission money matrix to better understand program financial sustainability and impact.
    • Describe three foundations and their approaches to building grantee evaluation capacity.
    • Develop a case study of a foundation that matches their area of interest.
    • Critically review grantee evaluation reports.
    • Describe career opportunities within philanthropy and as evaluation practitioners.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 10/12/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
    • 10/19/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 14 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    School of Social Work
    1080 South University
    TBD
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
  7. Engaged Policy Development

    As drug overdose deaths continue to rise, it is imperative that social workers are equipped with the skills to face this crisis, both from a micro and macro perspective. In this course, students will engage with the crisis from a policy perspective as they explore potential solutions. Students will participate in a simulation through which they will explore the role of the government in combating the opioid crisis. Examples of roles that students will take include: policymakers, policy advocates, prescribing doctors, and community stakeholders. Students will be assigned a role, will research their character, and will engage with the other participates as that character throughout the duration of the simulation.

    This course will be a good fit for students interested in expanding their understanding of the policymaking process, the role of stakeholders in that process, and the impact that advocacy groups and professionals can have in policy development. Additionally, students, both with a micro and macro focus, with an interest in substance abuse and mental health will have a particular interest in the content of the simulation.

    Objectives

    • Describe the policymaking process and the limits of governmental intervention.
    • Describe policy issues from a variety of perspectives and develop persuasive arguments for a position determined for them.
    • Identify positions of policymakers and other decisions makers on issues.
    • Students will develop a biography for their assigned simulation character that will be shared with and used by the other participants.
    • Students will engage with each other using the ViewPoint platform throughout the duration of the course.
    • Describe strategies for coalition building.
    • Participate in a simulated press conference in which they share their policy recommendations.
    • Students will complete a debrief about their experience in the simulation.
    • Identify key factors influencing the opioid crisis.
    • Describe the opioid crisis from a policy perspective as they explore potential solutions.
    • Describe potential methods for combating the opioid crisis.
    • Identify advocacy tools to engage policymakers about the opioid crisis.
    • Describe the role of social workers in policymaking.
    • Describe how to transfer the skills learned in this simulation to other topic areas.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 10/26/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
    • 10/27/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 14 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: TBD
  8. Alumni Webinar Series: Family Preservation with Diverse Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity & Expression (SOGIE) Youth

    Join us to learn about the innovative family preservation work the Ruth Ellis Center is doing in collaboration with the Family Acceptance Project to increase safety, well-being, permanency and placement stability with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) youth in child welfare. We will connect the direct service work to the larger strategy of efforts lead through a Children's Bureau Quality Improvement Center model. The Ruth Ellis Center, under the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, is one of four national sites selected to develop, evaluate and publish information on services which increase positive outcomes with LGBTQ youth in foster care.

    Note: This webinar is free for U-M SSW alumni.

    Objectives

    • (1) Identify the Family Acceptance Project (FAP) research which supports the need and framework for family preservation service delivery models. (2) Examine the benefits of FAP research being applied to traditional child welfare contract services. (3) Learn how the FAP Family Support Model is being evaluated and eventually translated into data. (4) Connect the FAP Family Support Model services to the larger efforts of the National Quality Improvement Center model to positively impact LGBTQ youth in child welfare.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 10/28/2019 12:00pm to 1:00pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 regular live interactive online

    Instructor

    • Jessica M. Fullenkamp

    Location

    online
    Online​
  9. Alumni Webinar Series: Trends in Philanthropy

    A growing economy, changing tax laws, evolving technology, emerging impact investments...all of these factors influence philanthropists. This session will explain current trends in philanthropy, including what, why and how donors give, and discuss the impact of those trends on charitable organizations.

    Objectives

    • Identify key trends in philanthropy that influence individual donors and the charitable organizations they support.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 11/6/2019 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 regular synchronous interactive

    Instructor

    • Eileen R. Heisman

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
  10. Social Work Implications for Pain Management and End of Life Needs

    This course is designed to educate attendees about the challenges in recognizing and treating pain conditions with older adults in this time of preferred minimization of opioids.

    Knowing when to consider Palliative Care or Hospice for older adults with chronic conditions will also be discussed during this presentation. Each presenter will focus on social work implications for their respective area of expertise.

    Objectives

    • Differentiate between the optimal social work interventions for palliative care and hospice.
    • Differentiate between the different treatment modalities available to treat pain in older adults.
    face-to-face workshop/seminar

    Sessions

    • 11/7/2019 9:00 AM to 10:00 AM
    • 11/7/2019 10:45 AM to 11:45 AM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 pain management in-person
    • 1 regular in-person

    Instructor

    • Amanda P. Eidemiller

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

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