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  1. Executive Leadership Skills in Human Service Organizations

    This mini-course focuses on the characteristics and competencies of the executive leader. After introductions and a brief overview on elements of leadership as conceptualized by different authors, we will look at a number of assays which will help the individual student compile her or his own profile. These assays will include "temperament" assessments such as the Myers-Briggs and the Emotional Intelligence Assay, on the characteristics side, and managerial assessments and Executive profile mapping from the competency sets. The interaction between characteristic sets and competency sets will be discussed. We will also explore the social psychology and sociology of leadership-in-action, Various readings from the Harvard Business Review, including one from Manfred Kets De Vries, an organizational thinker and trained psychoanalyst will be explored. The assignment will be to develop a personal learning/development plan.

    Objectives

    • Develop an executive leadership vision.
    • Identify organizational stages.
    • Describe existence, relatedness, and growth perspectives on organizations.
    • Articulate the difference between executiveship/management and leadership.
    • Describe qualities of a destructive executive leader.
    • Describe the Seven C perspective.
    • Explain the relationship of an executive leader to context.
    • Describe the role of the executive leader in making change.
    • Describe the conditions impacting executive leadership.
    • Define competence as relates to executive leadership.
    • Articulate the characteristics of an executive leader.
    • Identify Myers-Briggs type indicators.
    • Describe the Theory of Multiple Intelligences.
    • Describe the Emotional Intelligence Quotient. Describe the Transformational/Transactional Scale.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 6/5/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
    • 6/19/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 14 regular face-to-face

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
  2. HIV/AIDS: Evidence Based Programs, Policies and Services

    This mini-course will acquaint students with the basic and advanced facts about HIV/AIDS and sensitize students to the multitude of public health, social policy and social service delivery issues that AIDS presents, and provide US and global perspectives to HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention. Students will be sensitized to the special challenges AIDS presents for social work practice. Students will be presented with an approach to evidence based practice, and will review the state of HIV related evidence based prevention practice from national and global perspectives.

    Objectives

    • Describe the current epidemiology of HIV both nationally and globally.
    • Describe the history of HIV and its origin in Africa.
    • Describe the pathogenesis of HIV and current advances in HIV treatment.
    • Identify reasons why an HIV "cure" remains elusive.
    • Describe HIV among older adults and youth.
    • Describe HIV among racial and sexual minority groups.
    • Describe HIV geographic disparities and the role of climate change.
    • Describe the role of US healthcare in treating people living with HIV.
    • Identify current issues in HIV.
    • Summarize research on current issues in HIV.
    • Identify evidence-based interventions for HIV prevention and treatment.
    • Identify ethical issues that affect people living with HIV that have implications for policy and practice.
    • Identify issues related to mental and neurocognitive health that may affect people living with HIV.
    • Describe the international 90-90-90 targets for getting to "zero."
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 6/6/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
    • 6/13/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 ethics in-person
    • 13 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
  3. Animal Assisted Therapy Introduction Experiential

    This workshop will start with an orientation webinar on Friday, June 7 from 2-5pm. The remainder of the course, which is primarily experiential, will meet at the instructor's farm in Dexter, Michigan on Saturday, June 8.

    Course Description:
    This course provides an experiential opportunity for students to explore animal-assisted therapeutic activities specifically designed to further a wide range of therapeutic goals with children, adolescents, families and adult clients. Like play therapy and art therapy, animal-assisted interventions, when integrated with evidence-based methods including (but not limited to) CBT and mindfulness, trauma recovery, family systems, cultural-relational and psychodynamic approaches, offer opportunities for people to work through a variety of issues and insecurities related to attachment, trauma, self-esteem and identity concerns, dysregulation, behavioral difficulties, mental illness, developmental disabilities, and family and relational problems. With selected animals as therapy partners, the therapeutic team helps people of all ages and positions foster new alliances, understand more fully existing problems and build practical life-skills to enhance confidence, effectiveness and joy. Presently, animal-assisted therapy is gaining acclaim in the field of mental health intervention and there is a growing body of evidence supporting its efficacy and standards in the field to be explored. This course introduces the theoretical foundations, standards, ethics, evidence, certifications, integration of methods, case examples, evaluation and practical skills involved in partnering with a variety of animals, in particular dogs, cats, goats, pigs, horses and chickens (yes, chickens!)- to provide engaging and effective interventions.

    Objectives

    • Identify key concepts in animal-assisted therapy.
    • Define terms associated with animal-assisted interventions.
    • Identify issues pertaining to experiential animal-assisted interventions in the therapeutic farm setting.
    • Identify key ethical and safety considerations associated with animal-assisted interventions through experiential exercises and discussion.
    • Learn to enter ethical relationships with animals that distinguish between animals as therapeutic partners vs. used as tools.
    • Apply personal skills such as self-awareness in animal activities that focus on engagement.
    • Apply clinical observational and assessment skills through small group and animal interactions.
    • Describe key roles and responsibilities in animal-assisted therapy.
    • Integrate evidence-based and best practice methods with animal-assisted interventions.
    • Apply animal-assisted challenge experiences in a group experiential exercise.
    hybrid course

    Sessions

    • 6/7/2019 2:00pm to 5:00pm
    • 6/8/2019 9:00am to 5:00pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 ethics live interactive online
    • 7 regular in-person
    • 2 regular live interactive online

    Instructor

    Location

    online
    online
  4. Sport Social Work: Beyond the Playing Field

    Sport Social Work is becoming a powerful force in the field of sport and recreation. Social workers are leaders in infusing teams and programs with empowerment, self development, and inclusion, This workshop we will explore how social work values, concepts and interventions on both the micro and macro level enhance sport and recreation services. Specific strategies such as strength-based coaching, team building, conflict resolution, family collaboration, diversity training, community development, advocacy, and social policy will be discussed. Model interdisciplinary programs serving at-risk youth, members of the LGBT community, older adults, individuals with disabilities, and other special populations will be highlighted. Participants will learn how to apply the social work competencies of engagement, assessment, intervention, research, social and economic justice, human behavior in the social environment, social policy, and evaluation in sport social work practice. Clinical social work concepts from Systems Theory, Cognitive Behavior Therapy, Solution-focused strategies, and Adventure Therapy will be discussed. The workshop with use a variety of engaged learning strategies including discussion, guest lecturers and activities.

    Objectives

    • Outline the history of sport social work, especially the contributions of Jane Addams who founded the field at Hull House.
    • Describe the relevance of social work values and ethics, PODS, DEI, and anti-racist and anti-oppressive interventions in sport social work.
    • Develop curricula for sport and recreation programs for people of all ages, identities and abilities including college and professional athletes facing a career transition, psychosocial adjustment, and grief and loss issues.
    • Describe the needs of special populations - individuals with disabilities, LGBT youth, people in recovery, and older adults in sport social work programs.
    • Apply the social work competencies of engagement, assessment, intervention, research, social and economic justice, human behavior in the social environment, social policy, and evaluation to sport social work practice.
    • Create a sport social work program for a special population using social work values, PODS, DEI, professional competencies, and sport social work interventions (both micro and macro).
    face-to-face workshop/seminar

    Sessions

    • 6/14/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 ethics in-person
    • 5 regular in-person

    Location

    School of Social Work
    1080 South University
    2660
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
  5. Functional Engagement and Assessment of Families in the Child Welfare Context

    This workshop focuses on methods of engaging and assessing families involved with the child welfare system. The workshop will use active learning methods to help participants develop beginning skills in positive engagement strategies, developing rapport with the family and conducting family assessments within a family adaptation and resiliency perspective. The workshop will use small group role-playing and feedback and large group discussions.

    Objectives

    • Describe key principles of engaging families in the child welfare context and in conjunction with the MiTEAM case practice model.
    • Describe family behaviors from an adaptive perspective and apply resilience concepts to families in a child welfare context.
    • Apply family engagement and exploration skills.
    face-to-face in-service training workshop

    Sessions

    • 6/18/2019 1:00pm to 4:15pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 3 regular face-to-face

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: TBD
  6. Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) for Older Adults

    The Thursday course days will be held at the U-M School of Social Work. On Saturday, June 29th, the class will meet at Turner Senior Resource Center, 2401 Plymouth Rd.

    This course will address how depression & anxiety in late life compromise the quality of life in older adults. The students will be assisted to deepen their understanding of the thought process of those with depression and anxiety. They will learn how MBCT could help improve the disorder and see MBCT as a viable non-pharmacology intervention.

    The scientific evidence in the effectiveness of mindfulness interventions for mental health issues, and specifically MBCT for prevention of relapse of depression and anxiety will be discussed. The step-by step components of 8 sessions of MBCT wil be discussed and students will have opportunities to practice the skills. They will learn the differences in approaches between MBCT and CBT. Adaptation made to accommodate working with older population will be discussed in detail. The results of pre-post outcome data and qualitative evaluation of the MBCT groups the instructor led with local older adults will be shared. The ethical issues that have risen as the application of mindfulness spread through the society will be addressed. The roles that a MBCT therapist plays and the training needed will be discussed.

    Objectives

    • Define "mindfulness".
    • Describe a challenge that older adults face in receiving treatment for depression.
    • Describe the relationship between rumination and depression.
    • List 7 pillars of mindfulness practice.
    • Identify 3 major components of MBCT (mindfulness-based cognitive therapy) program.
    • Describe the difference between MBCT and CBT (cognitive behavioral therapy) in the ways they deal with negative thoughts.
    • Describe two adaptation examples to accommodate the older adult population.
    • Describe two exclusion criteria when selecting participants for MBCT groups.
    • Describe two research findings that MBCT has been demonstrated to be effective.
    • Describe one neuroscientic finding of mindfulness meditation practice.
    • Describe 3 important qualities the MBCT therapists need to have in order to facilitate skillfully.
    • Describe 3 examples of home assignments MBCT gives to its participants
    • Describe a mindset of mindfulness.
    • Describe the difference between "being mode" and "doing mode". Describe why the MBCT therapists need their personal mindfulness practice.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 6/20/2019 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM
    • 6/27/2019 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM
    • 6/29/2019 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 14 regular face-to-face

    Instructor

    • Mariko A. Foulk

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: 3752
  7. Introduction to Social Entrepreneurship

    In this mini-course, students will learn a theoretical framework for social entrepreneurship and design thinking, as well as explore the individual skills and will necessary to respond to complex social needs both locally and globally. Students will be placed on teams throughout the course to engage in hands-on activities, case studies, competitions and a leadership project.

    The objective of this course is to inspire and begin equipping students to become innovative leaders in the social sector. Specifically, we will address how to understand yourself as a leader within the context of a community and how to lead with moral imagination (the ability to put yourself in the shoes of the people you are serving); understand how an entrepreneurial mindset and operational skills can create and support social change; and turn theory into action by designing and carrying out a team leadership project.

    Objectives

    • Describe models of social entrepreneurship.
    • Engage in self-reflection on use of self in social enterprise.
    • Describe the process of team formation in uniting stakeholders around common goals.
    • Apply strategies for identifying an organization or community to impact.
    • Describe the concept of design thinking.
    • Apply "how might we statements" to better frame opportunities for social impact.
    • Describe storyboarding and customer discovery.
    • Describe ways to identify opportunities for social enterprise.
    • Describe models for social enterprise.
    • Describe the business model canvas.
    • Create a business model canvas.
    • Describe the process of prototyping to test an idea and gather feedback.
    • Describe the importance of storytelling and practice techniques.
    • Outline best practices for storytelling.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 6/21/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
    • 7/12/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 14 regular face-to-face

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
  8. Immigration Enforcement, Human Rights, and Social Justice

    This mini-course focuses on the real community and personal impact of a public policy with sweeping national controversy, many deaths, and significant questions about social justice, racial discrimination, and even intent in the constitution. Because it is a mini-course, rather than a full course, this course will concentrate on one aspect of immigration policy? undocumented immigrants and the public policy strategy of enforcement for undocumented immigrants at the border and in the interior of the country. Along with discussion of the policies and practices of enforcement, we will bring local enforcement activities to the table and examine their impact on people, families, and Michigan communities. The discussion will have a global, national, state, and a local component. Students in this course will acquire the skills to critically analyze this aspect of immigration policy and its controversies. and about community and organization responses and activism.

    Objectives

    • Identify and assess the language, intent, and extent of enforcement policies, the strategies and tactics of enforcement, and government entities related to enforcement.
    • Analyze the economic, social, and health impact of enforcement on individuals, families and communities.
    • Apply immigrant rights information effectively in community organizing and other activism.
    • Describe the history, causes, and consequences of undocumented immigration.
    • Identify personal attitudes and knowledge regarding immigrant populations and immigration issues.
    • Outline the history of immigration policy.
    • Describe the impact of increased immigration enforcement on the local Latino immigrant community, including the implications of being within 100 miles of the northern US border.
    • Identify implications of the largest immigration raid in the country.
    • Describe controversies related to the development of the Department of Homeland Security.
    • Explain the facts and controversies related to increased border enforcement at the southern border, toward awareness.
    • Identify social work and advocacy interventions at the southern border to protect migrant populations.
    • Engage with people who have been affected by increased immigration enforcement.
    • Describe recent (last 10 years) immigration policy reform efforts.
    • Identify core principles of humane immigration reform. Identify examples of advocacy efforts to create positive changes in local policies affecting undocumented immigrant populations, i.e. local police, city resolutions, tuition equality, etc. Know the ethical and legal responsibilities of social workers in interfacing with people who are undocumented immigrants.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 7/11/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
    • 7/13/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 14 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    TBD
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: TBD
  9. Social Work with Military Service Members, Veterans and their Families

    This course was designed to increase the knowledge base and competency level of social workers who plan to work with (or are interested in) military service members, veterans and their families. This will be accomplished by introducing participants to basic military background and structure, the common problem-areas experienced by this community, and the diverse sub-groups that exist within this unique population.

    The content covered in this course will include subject areas such as military culture, trauma, life after service (transition), problems/issues faced by family members and the study of specific populations within the service such as women, other minorities, and the LGBT population. In addition to improving the cultural competency in the areas listed above, students will also be exposed to the diverse and unique challenges faced by the veterans of different war eras (WWII, Korea, Vietnam, Gulf War and current conflicts). Time will also be spent discussing the kinds of clinical skills that are important for social workers to possess when working with this population.

    Objectives

    • Demonstrate improved cultural competency in the areas of military culture, structure and organization.
    • Identify recent U.S. conflicts and the their cultural implications for civilian service providers.
    • Assess the unique challenges associated with the various conflict-era veteran groups.
    • Demonstrate improved cultural competency in the area of the LGBT community in the Military and Veteran populations.
    • Demonstrate improved cultural competency in the area of Women in the Military and Veteran populations.
    • Demonstrate improved cultural competency in the area of other minority groups in the Military and Veteran populations.
    • Identify the specific cultural competencies that are needed when working with military service members and veterans with histories of trauma.
    • Identify factors that influence the stigma towards receiving mental health treatment in the military and veteran communities.
    • Demonstrate improved clinical competencies in the areas of assessment and treatment with the military and veteran community.
    • Demonstrate improved recognition of military deployment cycles and the challenges of family reintegration.
    • Identify and improve familiarity of available community resources and support networks.
    • Identify and improve familiarity of available community resources for families.
    • Identify the various barriers and available solutions that impact the Veteran population.
    • Demonstrate improved understanding of the full scope of practice for social workers, working with service members, veterans and their families.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 9/12/2019 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 9/16/2019 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 9/26/2019 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 10/3/2019 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 10/10/2019 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 15 regular in-person

    Instructor

    • Joseph Cafferty

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
  10. Managerial Supervision in the Human Services

    This mini-course, offered over two days, will focus on three or four key skills in the area of Managerial Supervision in the Human Services.

    Day 1 begins with an introduction to Managerial Supervision and the differences between managerial supervision and clinical supervision. We also focus on the tensions between these two work modalities and the conflicts they can create. Issues of power, fatefulness, working to standard, and evaluation are considered as well. Supervisory role playing in triads, with a supervisor, a direct report, and an observer will be used.

    In the afternoon of Day 1, the focus will be on Supervision for Retention, especially stressing areas, such as child protective service, where the supervisor and the supervisee are involved in fateful decision making but are not geographically proximate.

    Day 2 will stress the effective Supervisory meeting, both dyadic and group based. The second day concludes with a discussion of decision making within the supervisory context.

    Objectives

    • Differentiate between managerial and clinical supervision.
    • Identify strategies for handling common issues and problems in supervisory management.
    • Identify specific techniques for dealing with supervision in retention.
    • Identify specific techniques for dealing with managerial supervisory meetings.
    • Identify specific techniques for managerial supervisory decision making.
    • Describe characteristics of managerial supervision.
    • Describe characteristics of clinical supervision.
    • Describe characteristics of supportive supervision.
    • Describe characteristics of career-pathing supervision.
    • Describe characteristics of reflective supervision.
    • Describe the Forest Service distance supervision model.
    • Develop critical thinking about supervisory problems through vignettes and group processing.
    • Describe the Agenda Bell.
    • Develop and report on project pertaining to supervision strategies.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 9/14/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
    • 9/21/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 14 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    University of Michigan School of Social Work
    1080 South University Ave.
    TBD
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 481091106
    Room: B798

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