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  1. Death by a Thousand Paper Cuts: Understanding and Engaging Microaggressions

    "But you speak so well for a _____!" Everyone of us has experienced something said to us, or an interaction focused on us and at least one of our identities, that has made us pause and say "ouch!" internally. These small, often unintentional interactions are a form of discrimination called microaggressions, and research has shown that these small injustices can add up, and result in poorer mental health, lower self-esteem, and overall negative outcomes. That said, because of their implicit nature, we ALL are capable of microaggressing others at some point, whether we realize it or not. Participants in this workshop will talk about what microaggressions are, how they are connected to unconscious bias, what to do when we mess up and perpetuate a microaggression, and how to better engage microaggressions in the workplace, the classroom, and the world at large.

    Objectives

    • Describe how power, privilege, and oppression work through the four Is of oppression to harm and marginalized communities on multiple levels, including the interpersonal level.
    • Describe what microaggressions are and some of their impact on marginalized communities.
    • Identify responses to microaggressions when they happen in their practice, including when they themselves perpetrate them.
    Workshop

    Sessions

    • 4/26/2019 1:00pm to 4:00pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 3 regular face-to-face

    Location

    School of Social Work School of Social Work
    1080 S. University Ave
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: 1636
  2. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Suicide Prevention

    Suicide is a leading cause of preventable death in the United States and worldwide. Nearly 50% of individuals who end life by suicide see a primary care provider within a month of death, yet suicide risk assessment and treatment is consistently difficult in practice. With the majority of mental health services in the US being delivered by social workers, it is imperative that knowledge and skills are in place for our work with clients with the ultimate goal being to prevent premature suicidal death. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for suicide prevention is a valuable evidence-based intervention and effective approach to use in practice for individuals experiencing suicidal ideation and/or whom have made an attempt.

    This workshop will discuss suicide as public health issue in the US, suicide risk assessment, a brief overview of CBT theory and basics, and a central focus on intervention using CBT for suicide prevention.

    Objectives

    • Describe two challenges in practice when conducting a suicide assessment and identify one suicide assessment measure to evaluate risk.
    • Describe the theoretical underpinnings of CBT.
    • Identify and explain 4 CBT suicide prevention tools to use in practice.
    face-to-face workshop/seminar

    Sessions

    • 5/10/2019 9:00am to 12:00pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 3 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: ECC (1840 )
  3. Working with Latino Families

    Latinos constitute the largest ethnic minority group in the United States. The United States Latino population is immensely diverse, with members originating from over twenty countries. Latino sub-populations tend to reside in different areas of the United States, have different cultural practices/norms, immigration experiences, and varying levels of economic attainment. These sources of internal variation are important, as they have implications for many social outcomes and social work practice with Latino families. This mini course focuses on the theoretical, empirical and practice literature on Latino families in the United States. The mini course will allow for students to become familiar with demographic trends, health disparities, acculturation and acculturative stress, and the current debates surrounding the immigrant health paradox. Additionally, this mini course will cover key methodological approaches aimed at engaging Latino families in mental health and health care services, as well as barriers and facilitators to mental health and health care utilization. Furthermore, the course focuses on clinical aspects of working with Latino families, including but not limited to, culturally congruent assessment, and prevention and treatment models. Students in this course will acquire a general understanding of (1) the demographic, social and political background of Latino families in the United States, (2) key theoretical frameworks to consider (e.g., acculturative stress) when working with Latino families, (3) culturally congruent assessment, prevention and treatment approaches for health and well-being, and (3) acquire a general understanding of clinical aspects when working with Latino families in the United States.

    Objectives

    • Describe introductory concepts as they relate to philosophy (e.g., epistemology, axiology, ontology). The purpose is to have participants reflect on their own biases (as well as those biases of others) based on the philosophical paradigms from which they operate.
    • Describe the concept of self-of-the-social worker, and work to minimize biases when working with Latino families.
    • Describe Latino demographics, including population trends, sociopolitical perspectives, and family dynamics.
    • Integrate a cultural perspective into the theoretical frameworks to help guide their practice with Latino families.
    • Identify ways in which U.S. policies and intervention in Latin America shape immigration patterns today.
    • Critique the film "Harvest of the Empire."
    • Identify professional and/or clinical challenges to practice.
    • Identify readily available, culturally congruent screening and assessment tools for Latino populations.
    • Describe career opportunities for working with Latino populations post-MSW.
    • Apply concepts learned to case studies, with a particular focus on assessment.
    • Describe efficacious and effective prevention and intervention approaches to practicing with Latino families.
    • Identify career opportunities for working with undocumented Latino immigrant populations post-MSW.
    • Apply concepts learned to case studies provided to them, with a particular focus on preventive interventions.
    • Identify professional challenges related to course content.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 5/15/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
    • 5/22/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 14 regular face-to-face

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
  4. Alumni Webinar Series: Building a Culture of Philanthropy

    Non-profit organizations have the unique opportunity to fund programmatic, capital, and endowment projects through well-conceived philanthropy, and most require some level of donated funds to successfully meet their mission. Truly successful fundraising is achieved when a strong culture of philanthropy is in place. In these non-profits, everyone, including volunteer leadership, assumes responsibility for philanthropy and understands the important role they play in making it happen. Even when the organization has full-time, dedicated fundraising staff, no one is exempt. There are key elements that need to be securely in place for sustainable fundraising success within an organization. This presentation will define these elements, describe their importance, and demonstrate how participants can measure each element within their own organization.

    Note: This webinar is free for U-M SSW alumni.

    Objectives

    • 1. Describe the scope and breadth of philanthropy and other non-profit sources of revenue. 2. Identify best fundraising practices in non-profits, with a tool for measuring these practices in a specific organization. 3. Describe the role that all non-profit key stakeholders (board, staff, volunteers, clients) play in a true culture of philanthropy.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 5/16/2019 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 regular live interactive online

    Location

    online
    online
  5. Spirituality: Assessment and Intervention in Social Work Practice

    This minicourse will explore contemporary issues in spirituality and social work focused on what it means to competently integrate spirituality into one's social work practice. In adopting a holistic perspective to guide practice, spirituality will be viewed as a vital and essential dimension in the biopsychosocial assessment and treatment planning process. This course will explore the rationale and need to integrate assessment and interventions related to spirituality in social work in a manner that supports cultural humility and competent practice. It will examine spirituality as rooted in the history of social work practice as well as exploring how to best define, integrate, and use spiritual assessment and interventions in addressing presenting client issues in clinical setting today. The relationship between spirituality and issues of race, gender and social class as well as spirituality across the life cycle will be addressed. Specific methods and interventions will be highlighted and applied to practice with a variety of client populations. Relevant readings, discussion, case presentations, and experiential exercises will be used to deepen one's competence and comfort level with spirituality in social work practice.

    Objectives

    • Articulate the diverse and multi-faceted dimension of spirituality as a dimension in bio-psycho-social assessment.
    • Describe the role of spirituality in the treatment planning process.
    • Identify and describe responses and reactions of the various professional service providers (including social workers) to various spiritual beliefs and expressions and the impact of these reactions on client systems.
    • Differentiate concepts of spirituality and religion.
    • Articulate awareness of the variety of expression of spirituality with and without relationship to religion.
    • Demonstrate increased awareness of spirituality and its impact on client coping with suffering, loss, injustice and attempts to heal, endure and reach one's goals.
    • Formulate qualities of spiritually sensitive helping relationships with attention to diversity awareness.
    • Summarize different assessment models and tools for assessing clients' spirituality.
    • Identify various spiritually sensitive interventions and apply them to social work practice.
    • Engage in personal self-assessment and reflection on one's own spirituality and its impact on social work practice.
    • Articulate ethical principles relevant to spiritual assessments and interventions.
    • Examine evidence-based literature regarding impact of spirituality on health.
    • Identify potential problematic issues or areas of concern that can arise related to spirituality in social work practice.
    • Summarize developmental/life stage concepts relevant to spirituality.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 5/16/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
    • 5/23/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 ethics in-person
    • 13 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    University School of Social Work
    1080 South University
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
  6. Cultural Issues with Opioid Use Disorders/Substance Use Disorders

    This course will address the cultural issues, barriers, strengths and needs that may arise in substance use treatment settings. Students will gain a theoretical understanding of cultural competence models and related clinical applications in assessment and intervention. Students will gain an understanding of the potential strengths and limitations of implementation methods for cultural competence in SUD/OUD practice and will engage in a critical analysis of the available literature. Students will review epidemiological data specific to the prevalence of SUD/OUD and utilization trends for diverse cultural and identity groups. Concepts relating to race, ethnicity, racial and intergenerational trauma and the clinical relevance to SUD/OUD will be discussed. Specific manifestations of culture and sub-culture arise in the context of substance use disorders (e.g. spirituality, ritual, symbolism, language, art, music, dance, dress, politics and literature); specialized attention to the impact of these identities and evidence-based treatment strategies to navigating SUD-specific sub-cultures, will be reviewed.

    Student will acquire a series of generalizable self-assessment, and organizational assessment and intervention tools that can be applied flexibly to address cultural needs across a myriad of clinical contexts aimed at addressing substance use and opioid use disorder. Students will also gain knowledge and examples of culture-specific interventions, and how inclusion of one's culture in treatment can improve accessibility, retention and outcomes for individuals in substance use treatment. Cultural and linguistic barriers will be addressed with specific attention to culturally accessible treatment for opioid use disorder. Students will develop an understanding of the unique impact of culture within substance use treatment contexts. Students will gain knowledge and skills relating to the application of evidence-based strategies to improve cultural competence in SUD/OUD practice settings.

    Objectives

    • Describe theoretical models of cultural competence in the context of substance use treatment, including opioid use treatment contexts.
    • Apply critical analytical skills to evaluate the available evidence, research and applications of various theoretical models of cultural competence in SUD/OUD treatment contexts.
    • Identify approaches to implementing culturally competent practices in SUD/OUD contexts at individual and organizational levels.
    • Describe the unique role of culture in the treatment of SUD/OUD treatment.
    • Use structured and reflective assessment tools for self-evaluation of cultural competence in SUD/OUD settings at both individual/practitioner and organizational levels.
    • Describe epidemiological data on the prevalence of SUD and the general impact of culture on SUD/OUD treatment (accessibility, retention & outcomes) based on available literature.
    • Describe how to use epidemiological data responsibly, and will develop strategies to navigate common barriers to effective implementation of clinical competence (e.g. generalizing, assumptions). Apply culture-based knowledge effectively in the context of substance use disorders.
    • Identify common cultural and linguistic barriers to accessible treatment of SUD/OUD and identify how evidence-based culturally competent approaches can be employed to mitigate barriers to accessible treatment.
    • Describe "culture" and how culture is developed and expressed, and the impact of culture on health behaviors, including substance use.
    • Describe the unique sub-cultures and ancillary identities that arise in direct relationship to substance use. Identify evidence-based strategies for navigating complex nuances of sub-culture in clinical contexts.
    • List strengths and limitations of a variety of culture-specific tools, needs, and assessments; describe specific strategies to determine how to decide what tools may best meet client needs in clinical contexts.
    • Describe how stigma, culture, and substance use disorders may interact to produce barriers individually, within families and communities and systemically; identify approaches to improving the accessibility of SUD/OUD treatment for specific identity and cultural groups groups.
    • Describe the impact of culture on retention and outcomes of SUD/OUD treatment for specific cultural groups.
    • Develop a translational understanding of cultural competence and racial trauma in conjunction with learning about the specific needs, topics and issues of relevance to minority groups in the context of SUD/OUD Treatment.
    • Develop an ongoing professional development plan including specific cultural competence strategies relevant to one's individual practice setting, as well as generalizable skills that can be employed to continually assess and improve clinical competence in SUD/OUD practice.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 5/17/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
    • 5/24/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 ethics face-to-face
    • 13 regular face-to-face

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
  7. Non-Monogamy and Kink 101: An Overview for Clinicians

    Learn about the basics of kink play, how consent is discussed and negotiated, the difference between all the terms, and what it means to be in a 24-7 relationship. Understand the differences between fantasy (like 50 Shades of Grey) and reality, and how to support your clients/patients in their kink practices. There will also be a basic training on the basic types of consensually non-monogamous relationships that people have in their lives, how to support individuals in discussing these with frameworks with clients, and more. We'll talk about polyamory/non-monogamy -- various facets, how to get into it, and most importantly, how to help make it work when there are more than two people involved. Whether you're looking to learn something new, or just to add some knowledge to support your therapeutic or medical practice, this is a great overview for anyone.

    This course offers 2 AASECT continuing education hours and is available at a discount to alumni of the Sexual Health Certificate Program.

    Objectives

    • Identify basic tenets of kink including consent, role play, power exchange, pain play, establish limits and safe words, and analyze how to use this information in practice.
    • Describe various frameworks of consensual non-monogamy including polyamory, polyfidelity, and swinging, and interpret how to connect this knowledge to practice.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 5/17/2019 5:30pm to 7:30pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 regular synchronous interactive

    Location

    online
  8. Working with Individuals with Dementia and Their Families

    This course introduces students to the world of dementia care for older adults and family caregivers. Demographic data regarding increased incidence of dementia in all ethnic/racial and socioeconomic groups will frame examination of intervention research with individuals with dementia and family caregivers.

    Objectives

    • Define basic terminology and concepts in dementia care.
    • Describe the progression of Alzheimer's disease.
    • Describe strengths-based approaches to assessment in dementia care.
    • Identify ethical issues in dementia care.
    • Describe differential diagnostic process for dementia.
    • Describe MCI and different forms of progressive dementia.
    • Respond appropriately to family questions about diagnosis.
    • Describe the difference between delirium and dementia.
    • Articulate issues related to hospitalization and transitions in care.
    • Describe behavioral challenges and interventions in dementia care.
    • Identify and discuss policy issues in dementia care.
    • Identify interventions related to driving and dementia.
    • Describe communication and strategies to help caregivers with challenging situations.
    • Identify caregiver stressors and evidence based interventions, in particular resources for low-income caregivers.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 5/17/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
    • 5/18/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 ethics in-person
    • 13 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
  9. Working with Transitional Age Youth with Behavioral Health Conditions

    Transitional age youth, defined as the transition period from adolescence to young adulthood, represents a developmental periods characterized by, among other things, increased risk taking and vulnerability for behavioral and mental health conditions. Yet the social work theoretical, empirical and practice literature remain underdeveloped, particularly for transitional age youth with behavioral health and mental health conditions. Social work practitioners and researchers alike play an essential role in ameliorating behavioral health conditions among transitional age youth. This course focuses on the state of the science when working with transitional age youth with behavioral health conditions. Students in this course will acquire a general understanding of (1) the prevalence and variations of behavioral health conditions among this overlooked and vulnerable population, (2) etiological factors associated with behavioral health conditions, (3) theoretical frameworks to inform practice with transitional age youth, and (4) best programs and practices when working with transitional age youth.

    Objectives

    • Identify introductory concepts as they relate to philosophy (e.g., epistemology, axiology, ontology).
    • Describe the concept of self-of-the-social worker, and work to minimize biases when working with transitional age youth with behavioral health challenges.
    • Identify the most prominent behavioral health challenges experienced among many transitional age youth.
    • List etiological factors and antecedents that shape behavioral health challenges among transitional age youth.
    • Identify theoretical frameworks to guide practice with transitional age youth with behavioral health challenges.
    • Apply concepts learned to case studies.
    • Identify and discuss professional and/or clinical challenges one may be experiencing.
    • Identify ways in which the characters in the film reflect (or do not reflect) practice with transitional age youth with behavioral health challenges, and apply concepts learned in class to the film's characters.
    • Identify readily available, culturally congruent and developmentally appropriate screening and assessment tools for transitional age youth with behavioral health challenges.
    • Identify efficacious and effective prevention and intervention approaches to practicing with transitional age youth with behavioral health challenges.
    • Apply assessment tools reviewed in the course, with a particular emphasis on culturally specific assessment.
    • Apply an efficacious or effective intervention to a case. Participants will demonstrate a case conceptualization based on the theoretical framework guiding the intervention.
    • Participate in consultation with regard to efficacious and effective interventions that they may be currently using in their practice.
    • Apply efficacious and effective prevention and intervention approaches to practicing with transitional age youth with behavioral health challenges.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 5/17/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
    • 5/18/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 14 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
  10. Family Psychoeducation Intervention in Work with Adults, Adolescents, Children and Their Families/Extended Support Networks

    This course will focus on developing the group work skills necessary to implement evidence-based family psychoeducation interventions in work with adults, adolescents, children and their families. Special emphasis will be given to the family psychoeducation approach using multiple family groups in the treatment of severe psychiatric disorders. This course will examine the theoretical and empirical foundations for family psychoeducation, as well as, the practice of multifamily group treatment in schizophrenia, bi-polar illness, major depressive disorder, borderline personality disorder and with children and adolescents with serious mental illnesses.

    Objectives

    • Describe the psycho-biology of schizophrenia, the effects of the illness on the individual and the family.
    • Identify coping strategies to share with families and people with schizophrenia.
    • Apply the problem solving method and other FPE techniques to help run or start a group.
    • Describe the efficacy of FPE and how it is different from standard treatment for schizophrenia.
    • List other illnesses/disabilities FPE has been used with.
    • Describe the concept of high expressed emotion, how it effects patients with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, and how FPE attempts to change those behaviors.
    • Describe the psycho-biology and bio-social impact of bipolar disorder.
    • Describe how McFarlane's Family Psychoeducation method is used with bipolar disorder.
    • Describe how Family Focused Treatment, another EBP used with bipolar disorder, compares and contrasts with McFarlane's Family Psychoeducation method as it is used with bipolar disorder.
    • Describe how Family Psychoeducation has been used in other countries, and with minority cultures inside the U.S. Describe the effectiveness and modifications that were necessary to make it effective in other cultural contexts.
    • Identify the Family Psychoeducation (FPE) Family Guidelines for schizophrenia, and describe how they are used with families.
    • Identify the principles for interacting with people with schizophrenia based on the psychobiology of that illness.
    • Identify the Family Psychoeducation (FPE) Family Guidelines for bipolar disorder, and how they are used with families.
    • Identify high expressed emotion in families. Describe how Family Focused Treatment attempts to assess and change high expressed emotion in families with a bipolar disorder. Describe Social Rhythm Theory and how family and other daily routines, or change in/lack of them, can impact the course of bipolar disorder.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 5/18/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
    • 6/1/2019 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 14 regular in-person

    Instructor

    • James Svensson

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    TBD
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

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