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  1. ACEs, Resilience, and Prevention: Research-Practice Intersections

    This course will provide an overview of research on adverse childhood experiences and resilience in children, youth, and families. Participants will learn about goals for prevention and intervention programs designed lessen risk and to improve the life chances of those who are vulnerable because of ACE exposure. Content presentation, discussion, and small group work will focus on ways to integrate current research into practice settings. Material covered in the course is relevant to those entering or working in child welfare, health care, school systems, and juvenile justice.

    Objectives

    • Describe findings from current research on ACEs and resilience in vulnerable children, youth, and families.
    • Identify ways to apply research to practice in service settings.
    • Develop individual goals and opportunities to incorporate content into professional practice.
    In-Service Training

    Sessions

    • 9/21/2018 9:00am to 12:15pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 3 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: ECC (1840 )

    Fees

    $65.00
  2. Social Media for Social Change

    This minicourse teaches participants to use social media as a tool for community organizing. Participants will use the internet and social networks as easily integrated spaces designed to share information with peers and provide quick ways to organize communities and increase the reach of a group's voice. This minicourse covers the following topics: (1) Relationship building via Facebook & Twitter; (2) Facebook content for organizers; (3) Blogging hosts and content ideas; (4) Twitter content for organizers; (5) Use of video; (6) Mobile social networking; (7) Location-based social networks; (8) Online safety; (9) Discussions of: "safe" spaces online, online dialogue, and traditional organizing methods. Core competencies including critical thinking, social justice, and social equity are also examined and discussed in detail.

    Objectives

    • Describe three overarching issues for the use of social media for social change.
    • Develop a plan for social media presence of a cause, action or event.
    • Identify three ways to create content. Be able to discuss and apply Idealware approach to social media campaign development.
    • Identify at least three benefits and challenges of using Twitter. Identify ways twitter use responds to Gladwell and Zandt's concerns about social media.
    • Apply basic steps to create a simple Facebook page for social change. Discuss at least three benefits and challenges of using Facebook for social change.
    • Apply model of ethical decision making to social media.
    • Identify ways Facebook use responds to Gladwell and Zandt's concerns about social media. Identify and discuss three ways to use Facebook as an agent or representative of an organization.
    • Explain and apply basic strategies to use blogging for social change.
    • Identify two ways blogging use responds to Gladwell and Zandt's concerns about social media.
    • Explain and create simple media clips for use in You Tube, Vimeo and Vine.
    • Identify two ways to integrate online and offline/press media for social change.
    • Identify and explain ethical principles of communication, information and persuasion using social media.
    • Apply a model of social media planning to request to prepare appropriate continua of social media resources at competitive costs and resource appropriations.
    • Explain context and response to virtual attacks, hacks and security issues in social media. Provide contextual explanation of the use of social media by working against progressive social change. Explain and discuss what is meant by "social media of hate." Identify and describe at least two other very current social media applications, e.g. Flickr, Pinterest, Snapchat.
    Mini-course

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 ethics in-person
    • 12 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    Social Media for Social Change
    Shapiro MAC Classroom (Room 2000), Shapiro Undergraduate Library
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

    Fees

    $265.00
  3. Motivational Interviewing for Social Workers

    Utilizing numerous materials including the Professional Training Videotape Series developed by William R. Miller and Stephen Rollnick, this five-week series of 3-hour instruction and skill-building sessions will provide a basic introduction to Motivational Interviewing. Using the video material and supplemental handouts, along with lecture, role-playing and group discussion, this course will lay a foundation for participants to begin to develop their clinical skills in helping people accomplish change in areas of difficult behavior.

    Objectives

    • Describe motivational interviewing / motivational enhancement.
    • Differentiate between internal and external motivation.
    • Identify 4 variables in the "change equation" supported by multiple research findings.
    • Describe the relationship between motivational interviewing and the Transtheoretical Model of Change.
    • Identify basic tools/skills of motivational interviewing.
    • Identify 5 basic principles of motivational interviewing, and ethical issues regarding MI practice.
    • Describe 6 traps to avoid when using a motivational approach.
    • Identify 5 opening strategies of motivational interviewing.
    • Apply skills in early engagement, information exchange, and initiation of a plan of action with a client.
    • Describe 4-phase, overarching target hierarchy that organizes motivational work with clients.
    • Apply reflective listening skills in role-playing.
    • Identify 9 methods for evoking "change talk" with ambivalent clients.
    • Distinguish between the 4 types of "preparatory change talk," and the 3 types of "mobilizing change talk."
    • Describe methods for responding to severe ambivalence without creating discord in the therapeutic relationship.
    • Identify additional resources for developing MI/ME skills.
    Mini-course

    Sessions

    • 10/13/2018 2pm-5pm
    • 10/20/2018 2pm-5pm
    • 10/27/2018 2pm-5pm
    • 11/3/2018 2pm-5pm
    • 11/10/2018 2pm-5pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 15 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

    Fees

    $265.00
  4. Adventure/Experiential-Based Therapy

    This class will focus on the use of adventure-based activities in therapy with individuals, groups and families. Students will be introduced to adventure through readings, discussions, guest speakers and experiences. This one credit mini-course is designed to provide the student with a theoretical, philosophical and experiential understanding of adventure and experiential learning and its application to therapy. Course content includes the theoretical and philosophical foundations of adventure based practice, a discourse on the safe and appropriate use of adventure activities with different client groups, a demonstration on facilitating adventure activities, and use of adventure activities in assessment and intervention.

    Objectives

    • Describe how adventure and experiential activities can be utilized in therapy.
    • Adapt adventure tools for use indoors, particularly in small office settings.
    • Identify at least two ethical concerns related to Adventure Therapy.
    • Demonstrate an ability to practice within one's scope of practice and training.
    • Illustrate a level of familiarity with adventure and experiential therapy of specific relevance to the student.
    • Describe how to adapt activities contingent on developmental and psychological considerations.
    • Apply a facilitation model for adventure and experiential practice.
    • Describe an experiential approach to addressing resistance.
    • Describe the theory behind adventure and experiential practice and therapy.
    • Develop activities for their intentional use with specific clients and client populations.
    • Distinguish between Adventure Practice, Experiential Practice and Adventure Therapy.
    • Describe effective use of self with regard to adventure practice and therapy.
    • Identify ways to make the adventure/experiential approach more accessible to all ability levels.
    • Identify ways in which this approach can be adapted to accommodate for client diversity.
    Mini-course

    Sessions

    • 10/20/2018 9am-5pm
    • 10/27/2018 9am-5pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 14 regular in-person

    Location

    University of Michigan School of Social Work
    1080 South University Ave.
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

    Fees

    $265.00
  5. Family Psychoeducation Intervention in Work with Adults, Adolescents, Children and Their Families/Extended Support Networks

    This course will focus on developing the group work skills necessary to implement evidence-based family psychoeducation interventions in work with adults, adolescents, children and their families. Special emphasis will be given to the family psychoeducation approach using multiple family groups in the treatment of severe psychiatric disorders. This course will examine the theoretical and empirical foundations for family psychoeducation, as well as, the practice of multifamily group treatment in schizophrenia, bi-polar illness, major depressive disorder, borderline personality disorder and with children and adolescents with serious mental illnesses.

    Objectives

    • Describe the psycho-biology of schizophrenia, the effects of the illness on the individual and the family.
    • Identify coping strategies to share with families and people with schizophrenia.
    • Apply the problem solving method and other FPE techniques to help run or start a group.
    • Describe the efficacy of FPE and how it is different from standard treatment for schizophrenia.
    • List other illnesses/disabilities FPE has been used with.
    • Describe the concept of high expressed emotion, how it effects patients with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, and how FPE attempts to change those behaviors.
    • Describe the psycho-biology and bio-social impact of bipolar disorder.
    • Describe how McFarlane's Family Psychoeducation method is used with bipolar disorder.
    • Describe how Family Focused Treatment, another EBP used with bipolar disorder, compares and contrasts with McFarlane's Family Psychoeducation method as it is used with bipolar disorder.
    • Describe how Family Psychoeducation has been used in other countries, and with minority cultures inside the U.S. Describe the effectiveness and modifications that were necessary to make it effective in other cultural contexts.
    • Identify the Family Psychoeducation (FPE) Family Guidelines for schizophrenia, and describe how they are used with families.
    • Identify the principles for interacting with people with schizophrenia based on the psychobiology of that illness.
    • Identify the Family Psychoeducation (FPE) Family Guidelines for bipolar disorder, and how they are used with families.
    • Identify high expressed emotion in families.
    • Describe Social Rhythm Theory and how family and other daily routines, or change in/lack of them, can impact the course of bipolar disorder.
    • Describe how Family Focused Treatment attempts to assess and change high expressed emotion in families with a bipolar disorder.
    Mini-course

    Sessions

    • 12/1/2018 9:00am to 5:00pm
    • 12/8/2018 9:00am to 5:00pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 14 regular in-person

    Instructor

    • James Svensson

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: TBA

    Fees

    $265.00
  6. Pain, Effective Intervention, and the Opioid Crisis

    Pain is an often discussed experience that is not often well understood. This course equips the participant with a comprehensive overview of the different types of pain, and the variety of both medicinal and non-pharmacological interventions shown to be helpful in addressing conditions including the experience of pain. Historical and other contributing factors of the so-called "Opioid Epidemic" are also discussed.

    Objectives

    • Define 3 types of pain, examine the ways in which pain is a subjective experience, and distinguish how pain is impacted by multiple biopsychosocial factors.
    • Describe examples of medicinal and non-pharmacological interventions for treating pain, and cite risk factors that have contributed to the opioid epidemic.
    Asynchronous Webinar

    Sessions

    • self-paced

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 pain managem asynchronous online

    Instructor

    Location

    Online

    Fees

    $45.00

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