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  1. Sexual Grief and The Hero's Journey

    Pain and memories from sexual grief ambush clients and make them feel as if they have been taken hostage. Every time the surge of emotions arrives on the scene, the hostage feels exposed and hopeless. Sexual grief is often confused with sexual trauma, and though they work in tandem, they are separate. Learn to distinguish between the story of sexual trauma and the effect of grief on those stories. The silences get broken and the hostage gets released.

    The Hero's Journey will be used to show a systematic approach to breaking through the status quo of the dark night of the soul that sexual grief exposes. The self needs a base of empathy, empowerment and a strategy that also includes hostage negotiating techniques to face the non-linear aspect of sexual grief. Everyone has a warning label, the warning label portrays self-protection and what needs to be dealt with while in the depths of the cave.

    Objectives

    • Distinguish between sexual grief and sexual trauma. (AASECT CKA B)
    • Describe how to apply the Hero's Journey in working with sexual grief. (AASECT CKA H)
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 2/18/2022 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 aasect synchronous interactive
    • 2 regular synchronous interactive

    Skill Level

    Intermediate

    Location

    online
  2. Motivational Interviewing: Beginning Skill Mastery

    This instructional and skill-building workshop provides a basic introduction to the Motivational Interviewing approach first popularized by William Miller & Stephen Rollnick. Utilizing lecture, role-playing practice and group discussion, this course will lay a foundation for participants to begin to develop their clinical skills in helping people accomplish change in areas of difficult behavior, for which ambivalence is an expectation rather than an exception.

    Objectives

    • Describe motivational interviewing/motivational enhancement and its 4-phase intervention hierarchy.
    • Describe motivational interviewing's philosophical underpinnings, as reflected in its 5 core principles.
    • Identify and avoid 6 major traps that would interfere with helping ambivalent clients change.
    • Describe the 5 basic tools/skills of motivational interviewing.
    • Apply motivational interviewing skills in early engagement, information exchange, and initiation of a plan of action with a client.
    • Identify additional information and resources regarding developing Motivational Interviewing/Motivational Enhancement skills.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 2/25/2022 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 6 regular live interactive online

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Instructor

    Location

    online
  3. Building Efficient Meetings and Producing Effective Decisions: Achieve Twice as Much in Half the Time

    This session shares results from the Meetings Masters/Decision Maestros Research Project intended to help social workers conduct more effective meetings. The first part of the session highlights practices from Meeting Masters, including the Menu Agenda, and the Agenda Bell. Principles of the Meeting Masters help social workers in the four phases of meeting - preplanning, facilitating/running the meeting itself, processing items for the next meeting, and follow up and implementation of decisions and actions. The second portion reviews several examples of "decision rottenosity" and outlines the process of decision crystallization.

    Objectives

    • Describe challenges in effectiveness that surface in meetings social workers routinely have, such as staff meetings, staff consultations, supervisory meetings, agency board meetings, etc.
    • Describe what occurs during the four phases of a meeting.
    • Develop an agenda for a staff meeting.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 3/11/2022 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 3 regular synchronous interactive

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Instructor

    Location

    online
  4. Certificate in Integrated Behavioral Health & Primary Care | Adult Track

    The Certificate in Integrated Behavioral Health and Primary Care - Adult Track is designed for clinicians -- such as social workers, nurses, care managers, psychologists, and physicians -- who deliver or plan to deliver integrated health services, and who serve populations often presenting with complex needs in physical health, mental health, and substance use. Participants will gain assessment, intervention, and consultation skills; will learn strategies to apply these skills in the workplace; and will link with a peer distance learning community to practice new skills and discuss ideas.

    Introduction to Integrated Behavioral Health and Primary Care
    In this module, participants will learn about the nature and implications of integrated care, and will become fluent in the key terms that have come to describe it. Topics will include key public policies affecting the integrated care movement, including the Affordable Care Act; successful models of integrated care; population health management and health disparities; and ethical challenges and opportunities in integrated care. The transition to integrated care will be framed as a paradigm shift from disease-oriented to recovery-oriented service delivery, resulting in new opportunities and challenges, and direct implications for consumers and their families.

    Integrated Health Systems and Implementation
    In this module, participants will obtain knowledge and skills related to the implementation of integrated care services. Implementation of integrated team-based collaborative care presents challenges and opportunities for providers and managers, with significant implications for access to care and patient satisfaction. Topics include basics of integrated health implementation; telepsychiatric consultation; culturally responsive practice; Patient Centered Medical Home recognition; oral health for collaborative care; and provider mindfulness and self-care.

    Bidirectional Integrated Care
    In this module, participants will build upon their knowledge of integrated care implementation in adult healthcare settings. Topics will include the Wagner Chronic Care Model; collaborative care; stepped care; care coordination; and billing in integrated health environments. Participants will learn the "care coordination standard" for integrated primary care and discover new roles in primary care for the behavioral health consultant.

    Assessment in Integrated Care
    Initial and follow-up assessments play a critical role in effective integrated care. This course addresses free-form interviews such as biopsychosocial-spiritual assessment, structured screening tools such as the PHQ-9 and the AUDIT-C, and mixed assessment and intervention models such as SBIRT. The strengths, weaknesses, benefits, and limitations of common assessment tools in integrated health environments are reviewed.

    Behavioral Intervention in Integrated Care
    Common elements often form the basis of evidence-based behavioral health interventions. This course teaches and reviews behavioral intervention skills relevant to everyday clinical practice across disciplines and practice settings. Brief interventions around motivational enhancement, psychoeducation, cognitive restructuring, mindfulness, and values-based behavior change can help promote adaptive health behaviors in support of improved wellness. There is a strong emphasis on feasible brief interventions in a fast-paced clinical context and on adapting interventions to each consumer's unique biopsychosocial, socioeconomic, and cultural context.

    Biomedical Aspects of Integrated Care
    Many presenting medical problems are deeply influenced by health behaviors, and a growing body of evidence suggests that mental health consumers, especially those with serious mental illnesses or substance use disorders, are faced with a broad range of physical health disparities. In this module, participants will deepen their understanding of bidirectional integrated care for medical issues such as diabetes and obesity, and behavioral health issues such as substance use disorders and depression. This courses emphasizes the medical sequelae commonly associated with behavioral health diagnoses and psychotropic medications. There are special sections on primary care psychopharmacology and prescription drug abuse.

    Objectives

    • Explain the difference between colocation and integration.
    • Compare and contrast interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary teams.
    • Identify at least three social determinants of health for adult populations.
    • Identify at least five social determinants of health for the pediatric population.
    • State the role of warm handoffs in behavioral health consultation.
    • Describe the findings of the ACEs study.
    • Describe the assessment of pain in integrated health settings.
    • Outline the four-step model for approaching pain in primary care settings.
    • Identify the five core components of the IMPACT Collaborative Care model.
    • Engage in self-assessment in clinical practice.
    • Explain how provider mindfulness and self-care relate to workforce challenges such as burnout prevention.
    • Apply Motivational Enhancement in integrated health settings.
    • Define and apply "reflective listening."
    • Define and recognize "change talk."
    • Identify at least two ethical challenges to integrated health practice.
    • Address/resolve common ethical challenges in integrated health practice.
    • Identify two financing strategies that can facilitate integrated care.
    • Develop skills to hire and train staff in integrated health practice.
    • Use Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in integrated health settings.
    • Define and apply "cognitive restructuring."
    • Implement an organizational self-assessment for cultural responsiveness.
    • List the evidence-based components of Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) for addicted populations.
    • Describe 3 considerations for providing care to the LGBTQ population.
    • Conduct a biopsychosocial-spiritual interview in a fast-paced integrated care setting.
    • List 4 common screening tools and assess their strengths and weaknesses.
    • State the demographic health disparities facing people living with serious and persistent mental illness.
    • State the role of integrated primary care service delivery in remediating health disparities facing people living with serious and persistent mental illness.
    • Describe the components of the Infant Mental Health model.
    • Identify and normalize developmental considerations in adolescent sexual health.
    • List the 3 most common psychiatric medications prescribed in primary care and their uses, contraindications, and potential side-effects.
    • List three features of primary prevention of oral diseases such as dental caries.
    • Explain 3 factors leading to over-prescription of opioid medications and apply 2 strategies to counteract them.
    • Describe strategies for anti-racist practice in integrated health care settings
    • Identify three risk factors for teen suicide.
    • Describe how the IMPACT Collaborative Care model addresses common barriers to behavioral health care.
    hybrid certificate program

    Sessions

    • 3-14-2022 6:00 PM to 7:00 PM
    • 3-16-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 3-21-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 3-23-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 4-4-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 4-11-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 4-25-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 4-27-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 5-9-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 5-11-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 5-16-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 5-18-2022 6:00 PM to 7:30 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 ethics live interactive online
    • 2 pain management live interactive online
    • 14 regular asynchronous online
    • 17 regular live interactive online

    Skill Level

    Intermediate

    Location

    online
  5. Certificate in Integrated Behavioral Health & Primary Care | Combined Pediatric & Adult Tracks

    The Certificate in Integrated Behavioral Health and Primary Care - Combined Track is designed for clinicians -- such as social workers, nurses, care managers, psychologists, and physicians -- who are interested in the distinct considerations for providing integrated care to both pediatric and adult populations. Participants will gain assessment, intervention, and consultation skills; will learn strategies to apply these skills in the workplace; and will link with a peer distance learning community to practice new skills and discuss ideas.

    Introduction to Integrated Behavioral Health and Primary Care
    In this module, participants will learn about the nature and implications of integrated care, and will become fluent in the key terms that have come to describe it. Topics will include key public policies affecting the integrated care movement, including the Affordable Care Act; successful models of integrated care; population health management and health disparities; and ethical challenges and opportunities in integrated care. The transition to integrated care will be framed as a paradigm shift from disease-oriented to recovery-oriented service delivery, resulting in new opportunities and challenges, and direct implications for consumers and their families.

    Integrated Health Systems and Implementation
    In this module, participants will obtain knowledge and skills related to the implementation of integrated care services. Implementation of integrated team-based collaborative care presents challenges and opportunities for providers and managers, with significant implications for access to care and patient satisfaction. Topics include basics of integrated health implementation; telepsychiatric consultation; culturally responsive practice; Patient Centered Medical Home recognition; oral health for collaborative care; and provider mindfulness and self-care.

    Foundations of Pediatric Integrated Health Care
    Although "pediatrics" describes the age range from birth through 18 years of age, children develop through a number of distinct developmental, psychological, and social stages. The Pediatric track explores how to address the most common issues of these stages using a pediatric integrated health model of care. Topics include an introduction to the model, the role of the pediatric behavioral health consultant, pediatric social determinants of health, and interventions in the medical setting.

    Pediatric Interventions
    As the health care system is transformed from non-integrated to integrated, many services and interventions can be provided directly to the pediatric population as well as their parents in the medical clinic. Although many clinicians know typical child and adolescent diagnoses from a clinical perspective, this module helps participants develop an integrated understanding of typical topics that may present in the medical setting. Topics include ADHD, pediatric asthma, DD-autism, anxiety, depression, trauma, and adverse childhood experiences.

    Adolescence
    Many adolescents are required to attend at least one physician appointment a year, presenting an annual opportunity to engage them in management of their own health care and in the detection and early intervention of risky behaviors which can have lifelong consequences. Adolescents can be best engaged in self-management when their unique social, developmental, physical and psychological needs are considered. Topics include adolescent-centered medical homes, adolescent sexual health, substance abuse, suicide, eating disorders, and school-based health centers.

    Bidirectional Integrated Care
    In this module, participants will build upon their knowledge of integrated care implementation in adult healthcare settings. Topics will include the Wagner Chronic Care Model; collaborative care; stepped care; care coordination; and billing in integrated health environments. Participants will learn the "care coordination standard" for integrated primary care and discover new roles in primary care for the behavioral health consultant.

    Assessment in Integrated Care
    Initial and follow-up assessments play a critical role in effective integrated care. This course addresses free-form interviews such as biopsychosocial-spiritual assessment, structured screening tools such as the PHQ-9 and the AUDIT-C, and mixed assessment and intervention models such as SBIRT. The strengths, weaknesses, benefits, and limitations of common assessment tools in integrated health environments are reviewed.

    Behavioral Intervention in Integrated Care
    Common elements often form the basis of evidence-based behavioral health interventions. This course teaches and reviews behavioral intervention skills relevant to everyday clinical practice across disciplines and practice settings. Brief interventions around motivational enhancement, psychoeducation, cognitive restructuring, mindfulness, and values-based behavior change can help promote adaptive health behaviors in support of improved wellness. There is a strong emphasis on feasible brief interventions in a fast-paced clinical context and on adapting interventions to each consumer's unique biopsychosocial, socioeconomic, and cultural context.

    Biomedical Aspects of Integrated Care
    Many presenting medical problems are deeply influenced by health behaviors, and a growing body of evidence suggests that mental health consumers, especially those with serious mental illnesses or substance use disorders, are faced with a broad range of physical health disparities. In this module, participants will deepen their understanding of bidirectional integrated care for medical issues such as diabetes and obesity, and behavioral health issues such as substance use disorders and depression. This courses emphasizes the medical sequelae commonly associated with behavioral health diagnoses and psychotropic medications. There are special sections on primary care psychopharmacology and prescription drug abuse.

    Objectives

    • Explain the difference between colocation and integration.
    • Compare and contrast interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary teams.
    • Identify at least three social determinants of health for adult populations.
    • Identify at least five social determinants of health for the pediatric population.
    • State the role of warm handoffs in behavioral health consultation.
    • Identify and describe an example of the Pediatric Integrated Health Care model.
    • Identify requisite skills to serve in the role of behavioral health consultant in pediatric integrated health care.
    • Identify 1-3 impacts of trauma on pediatric brain and social/emotional development.
    • Apply motivational enhancement in integrated health settings.
    • Identify two primary causes of pediatric asthma.
    • Identify recommended evidence-based treatment options for ADHD in pediatric primary care.
    • Define and apply "reflective listening."
    • Define and recognize "change talk."
    • Identify the evidence based interventions utilized in Integrated Health Care.
    • Identify the five core components of the IMPACT Collaborative Care model and articulate how the model addresses common barriers to behavioral health care.
    • Engage in self-assessment in clinical practice.
    • Explain how provider mindfulness and self-care relate to workforce challenges such as burnout prevention.
    • Develop resources for psychoeducation of pediatric patients.
    • Educate parents/caregivers on issues of pediatric obesity causes and interventions.
    • Describe the assessment of pain in integrated health settings.
    • Identify at least two ethical challenges to integrated health practice.
    • Address/resolve common ethical challenges in integrated health practice.
    • Identify two financing strategies that can facilitate integrated care.
    • Develop skills to hire and train staff in integrated health practice.
    • List the 3 most common psychiatric medications prescribed in primary care and their uses, contraindications, and potential side-effects.
    • State the demographic health disparities facing people living with serious and persistent mental illness.
    • State the role of integrated primary care service delivery in remediating health disparities facing people living with serious and persistent mental illness.
    • List the evidence-based components of Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) for addicted populations.
    • Describe the components of the Infant Mental Health model.
    • Conduct a biopsychosocial-spiritual interview in a fast-paced integrated care setting.
    • List 4 common screening tools and assess their strengths and weaknesses.
    • Identify and normalize developmental considerations in adolescent sexual health.
    • Use Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in integrated health settings.
    • Define and apply "cognitive restructuring."
    • List three features of primary prevention of oral diseases such as dental caries.
    • Identify three risk factors for teen suicide.
    • Explain 3 factors leading to over-prescription of opioid medications and apply 2 strategies to counteract them.
    • Implement an organizational self-assessment for cultural responsiveness.
    • Identify symptoms of depression that could present in pediatric primary care.
    • Identify appropriate depression medications for the pediatric population.
    • List three common anxieties in children and adolescents.
    • Apply two prevention and/or intervention strategies for pediatric substance abuse.
    • Identify three symptoms of an eating disorder that likely present in healthcare settings.
    • Modify a physical environment to become a developmentally-appropriate and engaging adolescent medical home.
    • Identify a need for further assessment for developmental disabilities.
    • Identify symptoms of autism that are likely to present in pediatric primary care.
    • Demonstrate 3 considerations for providing care to the population.
    • Identify 1-3 strategies to engage adolescents in health care
    • Describe the findings of the ACEs study.
    • Describe how trauma may present in integrated health care settings.
    • Describe strategies for anti-racist practice in integrated health care settings.
    hybrid certificate program

    Sessions

    • 3-14-2022 6:00 PM to 7:00 PM
    • 3-16-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 3-21-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 3-23-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 3-28-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 3-30-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 4-4-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 4-6-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 4-11-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 4-13-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 4-25-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 4-27-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 5-4-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 5-9-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 5-11-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 5-16-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 5-18-2022 6:00 PM to 7:30 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 ethics live interactive online
    • 2 pain management live interactive online
    • 20 regular asynchronous online
    • 27 regular live interactive online

    Skill Level

    Intermediate

    Location

    online
  6. Certificate in Integrated Behavioral Health & Primary Care | Pediatric Track

    The Certificate in Integrated Behavioral Health and Primary Care - Pediatric Track is designed for direct practitioners -- social workers, nurses, care managers, psychologists and physicians -- who provide services in an integrated health care setting serving children, youth, adolescents and families, or those interested in providing care in a pediatric integrated health care setting. Participants will gain the knowledge and skills associated with providing consultation, screening, assessment, and interventions in primary care settings that serve the distinct developmental and systems of care needs for the pediatric population.

    Introduction to Integrated Behavioral Health and Primary Care
    In this module, participants will learn about the nature and implications of integrated care, and will become fluent in the key terms that have come to describe it. Topics will include key public policies affecting the integrated care movement, including the Affordable Care Act; successful models of integrated care; population health management and health disparities; and ethical challenges and opportunities in integrated care. The transition to integrated care will be framed as a paradigm shift from disease-oriented to recovery-oriented service delivery, resulting in new opportunities and challenges, and direct implications for consumers and their families.

    Integrated Health Systems and Implementation
    In this module, participants will obtain knowledge and skills related to the implementation of integrated care services. Implementation of integrated team-based collaborative care presents challenges and opportunities for providers and managers, with significant implications for access to care and patient satisfaction. Topics include basics of integrated health implementation; telepsychiatric consultation; culturally responsive practice; Patient Centered Medical Home recognition; oral health for collaborative care; and provider mindfulness and self-care.

    Foundations of Pediatric Integrated Health Care
    Although "pediatrics" describes the age range from birth through 18 years of age, children develop through a number of distinct developmental, psychological, and social stages. The Pediatric track explores how to address the most common issues of these stages using a pediatric integrated health model of care. Topics include an introduction to the model, the role of the pediatric behavioral health consultant, pediatric social determinants of health, and interventions in the medical setting.

    Pediatric Interventions
    As the health care system is transformed from non-integrated to integrated, many services and interventions can be provided directly to the pediatric population as well as their parents in the medical clinic. Although many clinicians know typical child and adolescent diagnoses from a clinical perspective, this module helps participants develop an integrated understanding of typical topics that may present in the medical setting. Topics include ADHD, pediatric asthma, DD-autism, anxiety, depression, trauma, and adverse childhood experiences.

    Adolescence
    Many adolescents are required to attend at least one physician appointment a year, presenting an annual opportunity to engage them in management of their own health care and in the detection and early intervention of risky behaviors which can have lifelong consequences. Adolescents can be best engaged in self-management when their unique social, developmental, physical and psychological needs are considered. Topics include adolescent-centered medical homes, adolescent sexual health, substance abuse, suicide, eating disorders, and school-based health centers.

    Objectives

    • Explain the difference between colocation and integration.
    • Compare and contrast interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary teams.
    • Identify at least three social determinants of health for adult populations.
    • Identify at least five social determinants of health for the pediatric population.
    • Identify and describe an example of the Pediatric Integrated Health Care model.
    • Identify requisite skills to serve in the role of behavioral health consultant in pediatric integrated health care.
    • Identify 1-3 impacts of trauma on pediatric brain and social/emotional development.
    • Describe how trauma may present in integrated health care settings.
    • Identify the evidence based interventions utilized in Integrated Health Care
    • Educate parents/caregivers on issues of pediatric obesity causes and interventions.
    • Identify two primary causes of pediatric asthma.
    • Engage in self-assessment in clinical practice.
    • Explain how provider mindfulness and self-care relate to workforce challenges such as burnout prevention.
    • Develop resources for psycho-education of pediatric patients.
    • Identify recommended evidence-based treatment options for ADHD in pediatric primary care.
    • Identify at least two ethical challenges to integrated health practice.
    • Address/resolve common ethical challenges in integrated health practice.
    • Identify two financing strategies that can facilitate integrated care.
    • Develop skills to hire and train staff in integrated health practice.
    • Implement an organizational self-assessment for cultural responsiveness.
    • Describe 3 considerations for providing care to the LGBTQ population.
    • Apply two prevention and/or intervention strategies for pediatric substance abuse.
    • Modify a physical environment to become a developmentally-appropriate and engaging adolescent medical home.
    • Describe the components of the Infant Mental Health model.
    • Identify and normalize developmental considerations in adolescent sexual health.
    • List the 3 most common psychiatric medications prescribed in primary care and their uses, contraindications, and potential side-effects.
    • Identify 1-3 strategies to engage adolescents in health care.
    • List three features of primary prevention of oral diseases such as dental caries.
    • Identify three symptoms of an eating disorder that likely present in healthcare settings.
    • Identify symptoms of autism that are likely to present in pediatric primary care.
    • Identify symptoms of depression that could present in pediatric primary care.
    • Describe strategies for anti-racist practice in integrated health care settings
    • Identify three risk factors for teen suicide.
    • Identify appropriate depression medications for the pediatric population.
    • List three common anxieties in children and adolescents.
    hybrid certificate program

    Sessions

    • 3/14/2022 6:00 PM to 7:00 PM
    • 3-16-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 3-21-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 3-28-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 3-30-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 4-6-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 4-13-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 4-25-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 5-4-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 5-11-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 5-16-2022 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    • 5-18-2022 6:00 PM to 7:30 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 ethics live interactive online
    • 14 regular asynchronous online
    • 19 regular live interactive online

    Skill Level

    Intermediate

    Location

    online
  7. Introduction to Budgeting and Fiscal Management

    This course introduces budgeting and fiscal management as a decision tool and provides specific technology for participants' future use, including the index of difference, the MacMillian Matrix, and the Cafeteria Compensation tool. Various kinds of budgets and their presentation will help participants to develop an understanding of fiscal management in social work practice settings.

    Objectives

    • Describe the relationship between financial budgeting and time budgeting.
    • Identify and describe at least two types of budgets.
    • Distinguish between "hard pay" and "soft pay."
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 3/18/2022 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 3 regular synchronous interactive

    Skill Level

    Beginner

    Instructor

    Location

    online
  8. The Christian Religion and Sex: The Deconstruction of Shame

    In our world, there are an increasing number of people currently being very vocal about the trauma they have experienced from the Christian faith in relation to their sexuality. Many are now seeking sex therapy and sexual healing because of those traumas. In this course, we will look at a brief history of the Christian Church and the effects its messaging has had on people’s sexual lives. We will examine the overall messages we have received around sex from the institution of church in the Christian faith and how those messages have lived in our bodies. We will then learn ways to deconstruct those messages in order to help those who suffer from religious harm, and practice some healing exercises to use with clients who come from religious backgrounds. These exercises can be adapted to be used with those from a range of faith backgrounds.

    Objectives

    • Name three ways Christian faith messaging has affected people's sex lives.
    • Identify at least three different strategies to help a client deconstruct the sexual shame they have encountered in the Christian faith.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 5/20/2022 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 aasect synchronous interactive
    • 2 regular synchronous interactive

    Skill Level

    Intermediate

    Location

    online
  9. Certificate in Mixed Methods Research

    Part 1: This program area will welcome participants to the MMR CE program and introduce mixed methods research to them. Research ethics and values are important for the responsible conduct of research and so in the components of this program area, participants will learn about the nature of research ethics as it pertains to macro social work and other applied professions. We will begin with a history of research ethics with topics ranging from the Nuremberg Code and the Belmont Report, to the U.S. Public Health Service syphilis study carried out in Tuskegee, Alabama. Next, we will briefly cover theoretical frameworks and the advantages of using theory for mixed methods research and practice in social work. Participants will be challenged to view the research process through a culturally sensitive lens. Finally, participants will have an opportunity to think about the implications for how the research we conduct with underserved and underrepresented groups influences what we learn from these groups.

    Part 2: This program area will cover the basics for how to design a mixed methods research study. We will begin by discussing how to develop research questions, then we will cover mixed methods language and notation, and then we will discuss choosing a mixed methods design. The research question is one of the most important aspects of any research project. It influences subsequent aspects of the project. In this program area, participants will be guided through how to develop a research question based on their phenomenon of interest. This is important because researchers make decisions about whether they will use qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods after finalizing their research question. Communicating research designs throughout various stages of the planning, implementation, evaluation, and reporting of the project will also be covered. Then, this program area will cover transformative mixed methods, which are germane to the social justice lens of the social work profession.

    Part 3: This program area will cover collecting data in mixed methods research. We will begin by discussing how to decide on the data collection needed to address certain research questions. Next, participants will be guided through how sampling plans are developed and recruitment strategies are made. Then, various qualitative and quantitative data collection methods will be discussed and presented in the context of their contribution to a mixed methods study. For example, qualitative data can access a phenomenon more directly than what is possible with formal, questionnaire-based measurements in part because pre-established questions are sometimes insensitive to important local cultural norms and idioms. Qualitative data, in focusing on natural language, deepen our understanding of the clients condition, clinician attribution of symptoms, and other treatment processes otherwise inaccessible to scientific analysis. This type of data is particularly useful in characterizing areas where formal measurement tools are lacking, inappropriate, unreliable, or incomplete. For social workers and other applied professionals, the human voice can be one of the most valuable insights into learning and improving the outcomes of clients. Therefore, it is important to incorporate and properly use qualitative research in our work. In this program area, participants will learn effective and efficient ways to collect and analyze qualitative data using one-on-one interviews, focus groups, and observation data collection methods. Existing records will also be discussed. Quantitative data (e.g., statistics) can sometimes be intimidating for social workers and other applied professionals. In this program area, participants will deepen their understanding of the ways in which quantitative data is collected.

    Part 4: This program area will cover data analysis techniques for mixed methods studies. First, we will discuss how to prepare qualitative and quantitative data for analysis, and then we will describe various ways to code and analyze qualitative data, as well as the most appropriate statistical techniques for quantitative data. Qualitative approaches promise to bridge the explanatory gap that exists between aggregated outcomes and actual events in the local situation. On the other hand, quantitative approaches promise the opportunity for true experimental designs as well as replication of study methods and generalization of findings. We will also cover secondary analysis, and how to use existing statistics to address research questions. Since the purpose of statistics is to convey meaning about how certain variables (e.g., the independent and dependent) do or do not (and to what level) relate to each other, this program area will provide participants with a user-friendly way of incorporating statistics into their work. Though descriptive and inferential statistics will be covered, it is important for participants to note that advanced statistical methods (e.g., structural equation modeling, hierarchical linear modeling) will not be covered. This program area will cover how to take the interpretation of mixed methods research a step further by preparing reports from mixed methods research studies. During this program area, we will also cover ways to comprehensively represent large and small qualitative datasets involving multiple cases both for inductive exploration and for more deductive examination of theoretically interesting relationships among data concepts and other variables. Communicating the research process is probably the most important step in any research project. In this program area, participants will learn about writing research reports, manuscripts for peer-reviewed journals, research briefs, and longer reports. Visual displays of mixed methods research results will also be discussed. The program will also cover the benefits and challenges of different ways of disseminating mixed methods research findings. Participants will be encouraged to consider how the factors that influence the dissemination of research findings influence how they approach their research. As social workers and applied professionals, we should not take information for granted based on its popularity or reputation. In this program area, participants will learn how to apply critical appraisal skills in the search for evidence and during professional judgment and decision-making. Participants will also develop and strengthen skills and knowledge related to the identification of quality research. Participants will be encouraged to consider the concrete ways in which their own work reflects rigor and quality. The program will also briefly address using mixed methods in program evaluation and across disciplines.

    Asynchronous lectures: The pre-recorded podcasts support the live sessions for the Mixed Methods Certificate. The podcasts focus on content relevant to designing and implementing a mixed methods research approach in social work. The podcasts involve participants in learning about core concepts and applications.

    Objectives

    • Describe ethics and values in social work research.
    • Identify ways to incorporate theory into social work research.
    • Describe mixed methods research.
    • Describe how mixed methods can be applied to social work research.
    • Describe why mixed methods should be conducted in social work research.
    • Name the key aspects of a mixed methods study.
    • Describe the steps involved with choosing the qualitative methods for a mixed methods study.
    • Describe the steps involved with choosing the quantitative methods for a mixed methods study.
    • Describe the steps involved with analyzing the data associated with qualitative methods for a mixed methods study.
    • Describe the steps involved with analyzing the data associated with quantitative methods for a mixed methods study.
    • Write up a mixed methods research study for social work practice.
    • Outline the history of mixed methods research ethics and the responsible conduct of research.
    • Describe the origins and purpose of mixed methods research.
    • Describe the importance of theory in conducting responsible mixed methods research.
    • Describe the implications for how the research we conduct with underserved and underrepresented groups influences what we learn from these groups.
    • Identify under what conditions someone should consider conducting a mixed methods study.
    • Describe the language and notation used in mixed methods research
    • Outline the procedures involved with choosing a mixed methods design.
    • Describe the challenges that may occur when choosing a mixed methods design.
    • Identify under what conditions quantitative and qualitative data should be collected.
    • Describe the conceptualization and operationalization of quantitative and qualitative research.
    • Describe measurement and sampling in quantitative and qualitative research studies.
    • Determine which descriptive and inferential analytic strategies should be used to analyze quantitative data and which inductive reasoning needs to be used to analyze qualitative data.
    • Describe ways to analyze qualitative data for mixed methods research projects
    • Describe ways to analyze quantitative data for mixed methods research projects
    • Describe the various ways the quantitative and qualitative data from mixed methods projects can be integrated to address a phenomenon.
    • Identify mixed methods projects in social work that can be interpreted to address a phenomenon.
    • Describe ways to disseminate qualitative data in mixed methods research
    • Describe ways to disseminate quantitative data in mixed methods research
    • Demonstrate successful writing strategies for mixed methods data in various settings. Identify ways to visually display mixed methods data in various settings.
    hybrid certificate program

    Sessions

    • 6/6/2022 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 6/8/2022 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 6/13/2022 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 6/15/2022 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 6/20/2022 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 6/22/2022 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 6/27/2022 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
    • 6/29/2022 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 16 regular synchronous interactive
    • 14 regular live interactive online

    Skill Level

    Intermediate

    Instructor

    Location

    online
  10. Sport Social Work Certificate

    Understanding and supporting athletes and their overall health and welfare has been a prominent specialty service area that social workers have formally and informally navigated for decades. And today, the need for sports social workers with advanced training has never been more requested across sport settings (youth, collegiate, professional, and geriatric). Research currently suggests that: (1) athletes engage in sport across the lifespan to foster a greater sense of belonging and social connection; (2) athlete mental health needs are increasing and licensed, mental health providers are needed to meet this growing demand; and (3) athletes are using their platform to address social injustices and bring awareness to long-standing disparities across our country. As established agents of change, social workers uphold the profession's mission and core values, while having an expansive scope of practice to improve outcomes for individuals, communities, and the larger society.

    The Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), American Psychological Association (APA) and other adjacent accrediting bodies do not currently require mental health professionals to engage in curriculum specific to understanding sports across the lifespan. This program was created with the intention of advancing social workers knowledge, skills and abilities as it relates to sports.

    Participants will:
    - understand the history of sport social work in the United States,
    - develop a functional working knowledge of the roles that sport social workers play across all levels of social work practice;
    - promote healthy relationships, encourage help-seeking behaviors, and establish and implement strategies for mental health programming that aligns with the mission and structure of an organization;
    - understand the role sport plays in athletes' identities across the lifespan, embracing the “Once an Athlete, Always an Athlete" approach;
    - apply evidence-informed practices in clinical settings, research and social justice advocacy.

    The certificate program is taught by nationally-recognized leaders in sports and will cover program development and implementation, mental health symptoms and how they manifest in athletes, crisis management, integrated care models currently utilized, sport performance skills, communication and relationships on teams, ethical research practices, the value of sport and social justice advocacy, identity and transitions, nutrition, concussion management, sleep, and more!

    Objectives

    • Implement best practice mental health crisis intervention assessment and intervention models within an organization.
    • Describe strategies for helping athletes navigate developmental changes from adolescence to adulthood.
    • Build an integrated health team to effectively address an athlete's medical needs.
    • Identify and address eating disorders and disordered eating behaviors across the spectrum of care.
    • Identify risk factors and assess for potential disordered eating in athletes, encouraging athletes to get help proactively.
    • Describe current mental health programs and their missions and structures.
    • Identify major historical steps in the development of sport social work.
    • Associate physiological and psychological aspects of sports performance.
    • Describe the impact of concussion management on athletes, coaches, team, and other support staff.
    • Evaluate an athlete's transition out of sport, considering the impact on identity, and stages of grief and loss.
    • Describe the impact of psychotropic medications on athletic performance, and the trends of mental health and medication usage in athletes over the past 10 years.
    • Describe how aging impacts older adults' experience of being a sports participant or fan.
    • Identify three interventions that can reconnect older adults with involvement in sports.
    • Use empathy when working through the range of emotions athletes are facing while injured.
    • Complete a biopsychosocial history using the Bronfenbrenner's ecological model from an athletic perspective.
    • Identify ways that mental health manifests in athletes differently from the non-athlete population.
    • Outline gaps in sport social work research and growth trends for the field.
    • Apply theories of identity development, resources, and treatment options to assist with transition management and adjustment disorders.
    • Identify the diagnostic criteria, symptoms, and course of treatment for insomnia/delayed sleep-wake disorders.
    • Describe the unique mental health and performance needs of LGBTQ+ athletes, and review available resources.
    • Describe the impact of community, department, and teams on inclusion of LGBTQ+ athletes, reviewing literature and legislation.
    • Outline drug testing protocols and banned substances, and identify resources to help athletes mitigate risk around banned substances.
    • Describe the role of sport psychologists and identify common issues sport psychologists help athletes address.
    • Distinguish between a performance and mental health intake and what is important to capture when working with athletes on performance enhancement.
    • Describe the benefits of experiential learning opportunities within sport.
    • Describe positive and negative mental and physical impacts of sport on youth, and the effect coaches have on youth athlete development in and out of sport.
    • Identify and implement programs that positively impact communities.
    • Describe the boundaries of confidentiality and the importance of healthy communication within the bounds of HIPAA.
    • Describe how research has helped increase support for athletes across the spectrum with a historical lack of empirical evidence.
    • Outline the roles and responsibilities of a sport social work fellow/intern and the other members of the interdisciplinary care team.
    hybrid certificate program

    Sessions

    • 6/14/2022 3:00 PM to 5:00 PM
    • 6/21/2022 3:00 PM to 5:00 PM
    • 6/28/2022 3:00 PM to 5:00 PM
    • 7/12/2022 3:00 PM to 5:00 PM
    • 7/19/2022 3:00 PM to 5:00 PM
    • 7/26/2022 3:00 PM to 5:00 PM

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 ethics asynchronous online
    • 2 pain management asynchronous online
    • 15 regular asynchronous online
    • 12 regular live interactive online

    Skill Level

    Intermediate

    Instructors

    Location

    online

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