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  1. Treating with Equity: LGBTQIA+ Inclusivity in Healthcare (Webinar)

    Doctors, nurses, psychologists, physical therapists, front office staff, and everyone else in the medical field interact with members of the LGBTQIA+ community on a regular basis, yet members of this community are more likely to be refused health care, be blamed for their medical issues due to their identities, and often choose to avoid health care settings due to these issues. This workshop supports providers on how to make health care settings more inclusive, providing training on the language relating to the LGBTQIA+ community, and help medical professionals optimize their workplaces into somewhere welcoming to all those needing health care.

    Objectives

    • Describe issues facing the LGBTQIA+ community when accessing a variety of healthcare.
    • Develop a plan for how to make practice more inclusive of the LGBTQIA+ community now and in the future.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 1/25/2019 12:00pm to 2pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 regular synchronous interactive

    Location

    online
    Online

    Fees

    $45.00
  2. Navigating Ethical Challenges for Social Work Online (Webinar)

    Professional social workers need to develop effective personal and professional strategies to effectively address ethical issues and challenges related to the use of social media in their practice. This webinar will utilize the 2017 NASW, ASWB, CSWE, and CSWA Standards for Technology in Social Work Practice and the NASW Code of Ethics to assist participants in exploring practice implications related to online networking (ON) and social media use. Participants will explore core ethical concepts that guide practice and define their personal and professional responsibilities with regard to risk management, as well as help them discover the benefits of sound agency policies related to the ethical use of ON and social media.

    Objectives

    • Interpret and apply the 2017 NASW, ASWB, CSWE, and CSWA Standards for Technology in Social Work Practice to ethical issues in personal and professional use of online networking.
    • Identify opportunities for organizational risk management that address ethical social media use.
    Webinar

    Sessions

    • 1/31/2019 12:00pm to 2pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 ethics synchronous interactive

    Instructor

    Location

    online
    Online

    Fees

    $45.00
  3. Art and Design for Community Change

    This course is aimed to create the following impacts on student learning: increased knowledge of the history of community based art and design in the US; increased knowledge of methods for collaborative community based art and design; develop skills in collaboration with community groups in developing community based art and design projects; Knowledge and skills to evaluate the impact of community based art and design activity.

    Our class is organized around principles of adragogy (adult learning), empowerment, and collaboration. We will develop a co-­learning environment that will include presentations, skill building activities and exercises, speakers, and different media. Experiential activities will be central to the structure and process of this course.

    Objectives

    • Describe ways in which live and abstract art by women artists and artists of color addresses politics.
    • Analyze the public view of abstract art as a retreat from politics and protest - an abnegation of a commitment to civil rights and feminism.
    • Outline the history of community-based art and design in the US.
    • Describe methods for collaborative community based art and design through critical review of case histories and interviews with artists.
    • Apply model of socially-just practice in considering use of art and design for social change.
    • Apply model of ethical decision-making in considering art and design for social changes in communities and communal spaces.
    • Evaluate the impact of community based art and design activity.
    • Outline the history of live art.
    • Engage with live art in both embodied and analytical ways (as audience, artist, and scholar-historian).
    • Critically analyze ways in which artists' bodies are displayed, made vulnerable, and empowered.
    • Describe ways that performance art can challenge boundaries between audience/performer.
    • Identify potential ethical issues within live performance art.
    • Creatively reinterpret the work of an artist or movement covered in the course through a final public performance, commentary, or review.
    • Describe how live art responds to the social structures of its time.
    • Describe three overarching issues for the future use of art and design for social change.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 2/1/2019 9am to 5pm
    • 2/8/2019 9am to 5pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 ethics in-person
    • 12 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    Art and Design for Community Change School of Social Work
    1080 S. University
    TBD
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: TBD

    Fees

    $265.00
  4. Creating Resilient Communities: Your Role

    This workshop will introduce participants to the Adverse Childhood Experience study. By highlighting the impact of adverse childhood experiences and toxic stress, participants will be able to identify how specific experiences impact the health and social behaviors of individuals.

    Michigan ACE's Initiative seeks to share invaluable information about the implications of ACE's in our communities as well strategies for prevention and healing.

    Toxic stress experiences by members of target groups will be discussed. Resiliency strategies that professionals and community members can utilize to positively improve outcomes for children and families will be explored.

    Objectives

    • Identify three categories of adverse childhood experiences.
    • Describe two ethical considerations and obligations for providing services to individuals that experience toxic stress and adverse childhood experiences.
    • Identify two resiliency strategies to utilize with children and families experiencing toxic stress.
    In-Service Training

    Sessions

    • 2/8/2019 9am to 12:15pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 ethics face-to-face
    • 2 regular face-to-face

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: TBD

    Fees

    $65.00
  5. Philanthropy and Evaluation

    This mini-course will focus on issues of contemporary philanthropy and the ways in which both philanthropic entities and their grantees can evaluate the efficiency, effectiveness and impact of philanthropic investments.

    Objectives

    • Outline the history of philanthropy within the US.
    • Describe contemporary trends pertaining to philanthropy and learn how to develop a network of philanthropic partners.
    • Identify the various types of philanthropic organizations and current social media trends pertaining to philanthropy.
    • Locate foundations and access 990 forms to inform their selection of a foundation for application.
    • Describe considerations and criteria for selecting a foundation.
    • Describe investments trends from the individual to the organizational level.
    • Describe how foundations are using place-based and system-focused giving strategies as well as capacity-building investment.
    • Describe how various foundations approach evaluation and measurement of impact with their grantees.
    • Develop measureable indicators and locate standardized scales to measure participant impact.
    • Use a mission money matrix to better understand program financial sustainability and impact.
    • Describe three foundations and their approaches to building grantee evaluation capacity.
    • Develop a case study of a foundation that matches their area of interest.
    • Critically review grantee evaluation reports.
    • Describe career opportunities within philanthropy and as evaluation practitioners.
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 2/8/2019 9am to 5pm
    • 2/22/2019 9am to 5pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 14 regular face-to-face

    Instructor

    Location

    School of Social Work School of Social Work
    1080 South University
    TBD
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: B684

    Fees

    $265.00
  6. Emotional Pain: Navigating Suicidal Behaviors in Clinical Practice

    Suicide is a significant public health issue. Suicide is the leading cause of death for youth and young adults from ages 10 - 24. Many social workers engaged in clinical practice have encountered patients who have a history or current presenting issue of suicidal ideation - some with a plan and intent to die. Social workers have long been required to assess the severity of a patient's suicidal behaviors and depressive symptoms. Emotional pain is identified as a core clinical factor for understanding suicide during the assessment and intervention process (Verrocchio et. al, 2016).

    This workshop will give special attention how cultural connectivity, attachment styles, traumatic events and substance use impact a patient's experiences of emotional pain influence suicidal behaviors over the lifespan.

    Objectives

    • Identify one emotional distress scale to help assess for risks associated with suicidal ideation.
    • List two reasons why we should broaden our concept of pain as it relates to suicidal ideation and behaviors.
    • Acknowledge three social work ethical principles that guide our involvement in the assessment and intervention process for patients experiencing suicidal ideation.
    face-to-face in-service training workshop

    Sessions

    • 3/1/2019 9am to 12:15pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 2 pain management in-person
    • 1 regular in-person

    Instructor

    • Abigail H. Eiler

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: TBD

    Fees

    $65.00
  7. Alumni Webinar Series: Understanding and Treating the Condition of Poverty

    Dr. Wilson's presentation "Understanding and Treating the Condition of Poverty" brings a new understanding of poverty as a treatable, environmentally based, diagnosable and treatable condition. This paradigm shift serves to undermine the character flaw mentality that promotes shame and stigma while promoting a science based approach to care. Using this framework, Dr. Wilson then presents the first evidence based standards of care to treat the condition of poverty that bring consistency in the screening, treatment and analytics associated with the condition of poverty.

    Today, recognized as a Clinton Global Initiative, Dr. Wilson's work, Transition To Success has statistically significant outcomes in 5 independent evaluations and is implemented in healthcare, human services, government, education and faith based programs around the country.

    Objectives

    • Identify common myths associated with poverty; promote a new understanding of poverty as a environmentally based, diagnosable, treatable condition; and define specific evidence-based approaches in the treatment of poverty.
    webinar (synchronous interactive)

    Sessions

    • 3/12/2019 12pm to 1pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 1 regular live interactive online

    Instructor

    • Marcella M. Wilson

    Location

    online
    Online

    Fees

    $25.00
  8. Managerial Supervision in the Human Services

    This mini-course, offered over two days, will focus on three or four key skills in the area of Managerial Supervision in the Human Services.

    Day 1 begins with an introduction to Managerial Supervision and the differences between managerial supervision and clinical supervision. We also focus on the tensions between these two work modalities and the conflicts they can create. Issues of power, fatefulness, working to standard, and evaluation are considered as well. Supervisory role playing in triads, with a supervisor, a direct report, and an observer will be used.

    In the afternoon of Day 1, the focus will be on Supervision for Retention, especially stressing areas, such as child protective service, where the supervisor and the supervisee are involved in fateful decision making but are not geographically proximate.

    Day 2 will stress the effective Supervisory meeting, both dyadic and group based. The second day concludes with a discussion of decision making within the supervisory context.

    Objectives

    • Differentiate between managerial and clinical supervision.
    • Identify strategies for handling common issues and problems in supervisory management.
    • Identify specific techniques for dealing with supervision in retention.
    • Identify specific techniques for dealing with managerial supervisory meetings.
    • Identify specific techniques for managerial supervisory decision making.
    • Describe characteristics of managerial supervision.
    • Describe characteristics of clinical supervision.
    • Describe characteristics of supportive supervision.
    • Describe characteristics of career-pathing supervision.
    • Describe characteristics of reflective supervision.
    • Describe the Forest Service distance supervision model.
    • Develop critical thinking about supervisory problems through vignettes and group processing.
    • Describe the Agenda Bell.
    • Develop and report on project pertaining to supervision strategies.
    Mini-course

    Sessions

    • 3/16/2019 9am to 5pm
    • 3/23/2019 9am to 5pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 14 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    University of Michigan School of Social Work School of Social Work
    1080 South University Ave.
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 481091106
    Room: B798

    Fees

    $265.00
  9. Theory and Practice of Infant Mental Health

    This introductory course will examine the principles of Infant Mental Health intervention with families of infants and young children. Using attachment theory as a foundation, we will examine best practices in supporting early developing relationships between infants and young children and their caregivers. Special attention will be given to understanding the processes through which practitioners can promote infant well-being and expand parenting capacity to nurture and protect their children.

    Objectives

    • Describe the history of social science with regard to past theories of child development and how they influence cultural norms of parenting
    • Describe theories of the relationship between early parent-infant interaction and subsequent development
    • Identify key features of four attachment templates of babies
    • Identify key features of four states of mind regarding attachment of parents
    • Identify consequences of failures or disruptions of the attachment process for both parent and child
    • Identify five core parental discourse markers that suggest increased risk for infant disorganized attachment
    • Identify five core parental behaviors that create increased risk for infant disorganized attachment
    • Identify strategies for effective intervention to strengthen early attachment
    • Apply a therapeutic response based on awareness of role of mirror neurons in communication
    • Identify transference and countertransference issues pertinent to infant mental health work
    • Describe how the clinician's own history can impact intervention
    • Describe concept of Parental Reflective Functioning
    • Describe how to listen for Reflective Functioning
    • Develop skills to increase Parental Reflective Functioning Identify the role of parallel process in increasing Parental Reflective Functioning Identify ways to support and maintain Reflective Functioning as the therapist
    face-to-face semester course (mini-course)

    Sessions

    • 3/23/2019 9am to 5pm
    • 3/30/2019 9am to 5pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 14 regular in-person

    Instructor

    Location

    U-M School of Social Work School of Social Work
    1080 South University Avenue
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: B770

    Fees

    $265.00
  10. Death by a Thousand Paper Cuts: Understanding and Engaging Microaggressions

    "But you speak so well for a _____!" Everyone of us has experienced something said to us, or an interaction focused on us and at least one of our identities, that has made us pause and say "ouch!" internally. These small, often unintentional interactions are a form of discrimination called microaggressions, and research has shown that these small injustices can add up, and result in poorer mental health, lower self-esteem, and overall negative outcomes. That said, because of their implicit nature, we ALL are capable of microaggressing others at some point, whether we realize it or not. Participants in this workshop will talk about what microaggressions are, how they are connected to unconscious bias, what to do when we mess up and perpetuate a microaggression, and how to better engage microaggressions in the workplace, the classroom, and the world at large.

    Objectives

    • Describe how power, privilege, and oppression work through the four Is of oppression to harm and marginalized communities on multiple levels, including the interpersonal level.
    • Describe what microaggressions are and some of their impact on marginalized communities.
    • Identify responses to microaggressions when they happen in their practice, including when they themselves perpetrate them.
    Workshop

    Sessions

    • 3/29/2019 1pm to 4pm

    CE Contact Hours

    • 3 regular face-to-face

    Location

    School of Social Work School of Social Work
    1080 S. University Ave
    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
    Room: TBD

    Fees

    $65.00

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