Learning and Teaching During COVID-19

Contact My SSW Intranet Report Sexual Misconduct

Main menu

Class Descriptions

Social Work Practice with Children and Youth SW696

Former Curriculum

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: SW 521 and SW 560
Course Description: This advanced level methods course in the Children and Youth in Families and Societies concentration builds upon the foundation level practice methods course and prepares students for employment in the many human service delivery systems which address the needs of children, youth, and their families. This cross-cutting skills course encompasses both direct/micro (i.e., assessment, intervention, prevention) and mezzo and macro (program design, evaluation, administration, community organization, policy analysis) practice methods used to address problems presented by or to children and youth in a variety of contexts. The development of social work skills, values, and ethics applicable to promotion, prevention, intervention, remediation and social rehabilitation activities with diverse child and youth populations at all levels of intervention will be emphasized. Evidence-based change interventions that build on strengths and resources of children and their families at all levels of intervention will be examined in order to develop socially just and culturally-competent policies and practice. This course will address the key diversity dimensions (include list) as it relates to children, youth and their families.

Social Work Practice with Community and Social Systems SW697

Former Curriculum

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: SW 560
Course Description: This course will prepare students to engage in integrated practice focused on utilizing community and social systems to support and empower individuals, families, and communities and envision and work towards social justice goals. This will include skills for entering, assessing, and working collaboratively with client systems and their social networks, including assessment of power differences and building on diversity within the community. This course will build on practice methods presented in the foundation courses and give special attention to partnership, strengths based, and empowering models of practice and those that further social justice goals. Special emphasis will be placed on conducting this work in a multicultural context with vulnerable and oppressed populations and communities and to identify and reduce the consequences of unrecognized privilege.

Social Work Practice in Mental Health SW698

Former Curriculum

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: SW 521
Course Description: This course teaches practice models and methods of intervention for effective social work practice in mental health care, including the promotion of mental health, the prevention of mental illnesses, and the delivery of psychosocial treatment and rehabilitation services. A major focus is on enabling individuals with mental health problems to increase their functioning in the least restrictive environments, with the least amount of ongoing professional intervention, so these individuals maximize their success and satisfaction. This course has a specific emphasis on services to individuals who suffer from severe and persistent mental illness, substance abuse, and/or who are recovering from the effects of severe traumatic events. Interventions relevant to these conditions help individuals develop/restore their skills and empower them to modify their environments so as to improve their interactions with their environments. Culturally competent and gender-specific interventions are a major emphasis of the course, as are special mental health issues for groups who have been subject to oppression. Special attention will be devoted to evidence-based treatments for mental health problems.

Social Work Practice in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention SW699

Former Curriculum

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: SW 521 and SW 560 or permission of instructor
Course Description: This course teaches practice models and multi-level methods of intervention for effective social work practice in health care, including health promotion, disease prevention, assessment, treatment, rehabilitation, continuing care, and discharge planning. Examples of topics covered include the use of the current ICD system in assessment, screening and early intervention, workplace health promotion, crisis intervention, intervention in major catastrophic or chronic diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, HIV/AIDS, and depression; promotion of optimal adaptation to chronic illness through interpersonal, organizational, and environmental interventions; self-help and mutual aid, rehabilitation and continuing care, supporting caregivers and integrative and complementary interventions. Selected issues and methods in supervision and management are addressed, such as individual, peer and workgroup models on practice. The impact of differences in ability, age, class, color, culture, ethnicity, family structure, gender (including gender identity and gender expression) marital status, national origin, race, religion or spirituality, sex, and sexual orientation will be examined , as these relate to various health practices, policies and services.

Treatment Strategies for Sexual Dysfunction SW700

Former Curriculum

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: SW 521/permission of instructor
Course Description: This course will address the practice theories and techniques for assessment, evaluation, and treatment of individuals and couples presenting with sexual difficulties. This course will provide grounding in the following perspectives: attachment theory, psycho-sexual development and functioning across the life span, physiology of sexual functioning, contemporary and historic approaches to understanding human sexual behavior, and the interaction of physiology, personality, and social influence in developing a sexual self. Variations in human sexual function and expression will be discussed from physiologic and sociocultural viewpoints. The practice component will address major clinical concepts, including assessment, evaluation, differential diagnosis, and treatment planning. Intervention techniques will be discussed considering their effectiveness with different kinds of sexual problems, in different practice settings, and respecting client differences, including the diverse dimensions (including ability, age, class, color, culture, ethnicity, family structure, gender (including gender identity and gender expression), marital status, national origin, race, religion or spirituality, sex, and sexual orientation). The applicability and limitations of different theoretical approaches will be discussed. This course will focus on empirically based models of intervention and the use of evaluative tools in the practice setting.

Practice in International Social Work SW701

Former Curriculum

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: SW 521 and SW 560
Course Description: This course is intended to prepare social work students for involvement in social development interventions in an international arena. This course will focus selectively on the challenges developing countries face in improving the lives of their citizens and the roles social workers can play in solving or successfully addressing them. Among the issues, some of the following are included: provision of basic life necessities, hunger and nutritional insufficiency, education, economic development, the strains related to urbanization and modernization, ethnic conflict, child protection, community and familial violence, environment and community health, organization and administration of human services, and citizen empowerment. Students will learn about strategies used by service providers, institutions, and self-help groups for the purposes of social transformation, community development, and enhancement of individual well-being. Central to the discourse will be an idiographic-nomothetic dialectic which counter-poses what is universal and what is culturally specific about social welfare issues and interventions across countries and regions. Course readings and discussion will begin with a focus on the globalization of selected social problems. An array of skills will be drawn from the traditional practice armamentarium of micro and macro social work methods to communicate to take collective action. Discourse will also focus on ways that these classic approaches must be adapted to increase their relevance for work in developing regions of the world, in international aid or relief organizations, and in programs for immigrants or refugees in this and other more technically developed countries. This course will also teach about newer models of social development and the opportunities these countries have and may offer to social workers working with their people.

Family Violence Prevention and Intervention SW702

Former Curriculum

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: SW 521 and SW 560
Course Description: The focus of this course is on the methods of prevention, intervention and social change used to address and end the major forms of family violence. "Family" is defined broadly to include any intimate relationship. The course will provide overviews of the risk factors and traumatic effects of family violence. There will be an emphasis placed on the special needs of oppressed groups. Most family violence organizations work on multiple levels, such as macro, mezzo, and micro levels, and they frequently come into contact with a variety of fields of service, primarily the legal, health and mental health, housing, public assistance, and child welfare systems. Therefore, models of inter-system and inter-disciplinary coordination will be presented. Illustrations of the integration of micro, mezzo, and macro practice will be given, in particular how dimensions of power, privilege, oppression, and difference influence actions, perceptions, choices and consequences across system levels. The understanding and critical evaluation of theories, policies, organizations, and interventions using scientific principles will be stressed.

Developing Practice Skills Through Role-Play and Client Simulation SW703

Former Curriculum

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: In this seminar, students will apply multiple techniques for developing, performing and analyzing client simulations at the individual, family, group, and community level. Through these simulations, students will deepen their understanding of clients’ lives, explore research and clinical literature relevant to the problems and issues of the simulated client systems, apply evidence-based practice methods and analyze the social justice issues implicit in the simulations. This seminar will place these techniques in historical context, critically examining how simulation and role play developed in theater, psychotherapy and other fields. Student's deep engagement with the characters they create and enact in the simulations will provide a forum for self-reflection and professional growth.

Ethical Dilemmas in Health for Social Work and Other Health Professions SW705

Former Curriculum

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: From a beginning in efforts to protect human rights in biomedical research, the field of health-related ethics, sometimes called “bioethics” has grown rapidly. It now encompasses such major areas as equity of access to, and delivery of, health care services, and the impact of the rapid proliferation of technologies (e.g. genetic and advanced diagnostic testing, prenatal, mind-altering and life-prolonging treatments) on how human life is defined, and on health care decisions and quality of life. While many of these issues, and the dilemmas they create, focus on the rights and burdens of individuals and families, ethical dilemmas in health have increasingly far-reaching implications for communities and societies. These dilemmas pose challenges to social workers, social service and health care practitioners, administrators, policy makers and social and health scientists. Issues that have traditionally been private concerns are increasingly played out in the public arena, with passionate constituencies and extensive, and often inflammatory, media attention. The key roles and importance of well-trained and practiced social workers and other health care providers, administrators, planners and policy makers in assuring equitable treatment and protecting individuals, communities and societies, provide the central rationale for this course. This course will use a case-study approach. It will use ethical frameworks from social work, medicine, public health, nursing, psychology and others health-related fields for decision-making, both generally and as applied to specific dilemmas. The course will also include discussion of conflicts between professional ethics codes and federal, state and local laws, regulations and codes (e.g. penal, mental health).

Interpersonal Practice with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Clients SW707

Former Curriculum

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: SW 521/permission of instructor
Course Description: This course will address issues of concern to interpersonal practice clients that identify as Transgender, Lesbian, Bisexual, Gay, Questioning, or Non Straight (TLBGQNS). This course will build on basic IP skills and knowledge of, primarily, individual therapy. Issues which are of greater concern, or for which services and in some cases, knowledge are lacking for these groups will be reviewed. For example, these issues will include: the development of sexual identity, coming out, social stigma, substance abuse, HIV and AIDS, the interaction of discrimination due to gender and/or ethnicity with the discrimination due to sexual orientation, violence within relationships and violence against these groups, discrimination on the basis of orientation, suicide, family development and parenting, passing and community interaction, and policy. This course will closely focus on skills needed for working with these specific issues.

Special Issues in Interpersonal Violence SW708

Former Curriculum

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This course will focus on issues of relevance for social work in the field of interpersonal violence. The topics will change over time, and thus it will be able to respond to the latest developments in the field. The course will integrate content on privilege, oppression, diversity, social justice, prevention and promotion, and ethics in each topic chosen. The seminal and emerging social science theories and research will be applied to the areas of violence being explored.

Dialogue Facilitation for Diversity and Social Justice SW709

Former Curriculum

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This course is designed to give students a foundation in the awareness, knowledge, understanding, and skills needed to effectively carry out multicultural social work practice with populations who are culturally diverse in terms of the key diversity dimensions such as "ability, age, class, color, culture, ethnicity, family structure, gender (including gender identity and gender expression), marital status, national origin, race, religion or spirituality, sex, and sexual orientation". In particular, students will gain skills in facilitating multicultural group interactions and in resolving conflicts or resistance that may emerge due to cultural misunderstandings or oppressive dynamics. The topics of this course include social identity group development; prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; difference and dominance and the nature of social oppression; our personal and interpersonal connections to power, privilege, and oppression; understanding and resolving conflicts or resistance; methods of dialoguing and coalition building across differences; and basic group facilitation skills and their applications in multicultural settings.

Behavior and Environment (SEAS) SW710

Former Curriculum

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This course deals with two central themes.  First, environmental problems are people problems requiring an understanding of how people think, what they care about, and the conditions under which they behave most reasonably.  Second, human behavior makes the most sense when studied in the context of the environment, both present and evolutionary.  The course builds a model of human nature based upon research in the field of environmental psychology. The course will explore such topics as environmental perception and knowledge, preferred environments and coping with the failure of preference, and mental attention fatigue and restoration.  It then applies this model to such issues as common property resource management and the psychology of sustainability. The course is cross-disciplinary both in emphasis and student population with the disciplines of natural resource policy, planning and management, environmental education, conservation behavior, psychology, landscape architecture and urban planning typically represented.

Advanced Topics in Social Work SW713

Former Curriculum

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This course is taught by various members of the program faculty. Each version of the course has its own subtitle, some being offered one time only while others are repeated and may evolve into regular courses with their own course number and title.

Adventure/Experiential-Based Social Work Practice SW715

Former Curriculum

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This advanced level methods course builds upon the foundation level practice methods course and prepares students for employment in the many human service delivery systems which address the needs of individuals (especially children and youth) and their families. This cross-cutting skills course will cover mostly direct/micro (i.e., assessment, intervention, prevention) and some mezzo and macro (program development and design, evaluation) practice methods. The development of social work skills, values, and ethics applicable to promotion, prevention, intervention, remediation and social rehabilitation activities with diverse individual populations at all levels of intervention will be emphasized. This course will focus on experiential and adventure practice (theories, models, tools and techniques) that social workers may use in their work with individuals, groups, families, organizations and communities. Some particular focus will be given to their use in social work with groups. Students will be introduced to adventure through readings, discussions, guest speakers and experiences. This course is designed to provide the student with a theoretical, philosophical and experiential understanding of adventure and experiential learning and its application to Social Work Practice. Theoretical models of practice arising out of the adventure and experiential fields will be offered and discussed in tandem with current social work theories and models of practice. Evidence-based literature will be reviewed to promote experiential interventions that build on strengths and resources of individuals and their families, and that integrate components of evidence based practice into the experiential methodologies. Socially just and culturally-competent policies and practice will be highlighted. This course will address how adventure/experiential practice must attend to the key diversity dimensions (including ability, age, class, color, culture, ethnicity, family structure, gender (including gender identity and gender expression), marital status, national origin, race, religion or spirituality, sex, and sexual orientation) as it relates to individuals and their families.

International Community Organization SW716

Former Curriculum

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This course provides intensive didactic and experiential learning for students interested in comparative community work across countries of concern or interest. The course examines core concepts of community practice, major models of comparative policy work, and practical steps for community-based work. It is designed to provide knowledge and skills to build upon and prepare for more advanced courses in comparative urban policy, community-based work with youth, and non-governmental social justice community organization. This course exposes students to the ways in which organizations and agents (organizations, municipal governance, grass roots and community residents) in various countries throughout the world organizing community residents to engage in social and political action on their own behalf or on behalf of others. Students will analyze the ways in which countries use different approaches to mobilizing people for collective action, challenging oppressive structures and processes, building organizational capacity, implementing action plans, and generating power in the community. The course includes analysis of the impact of international flows of labor, education, people and related commodities on creation and disruption of power structures; the formulation of action strategies; the use of tactics involving persuasion, consensus, and conflict; the organization, implementation and evaluation of community campaigns; the use of political and media advocacy; and the relationship of social and political action to contemporary issues which affect oppressed and disadvantaged communities in these countries. Case examples will be drawn between the U.S. and other nations. Special emphasis will be placed on organizing communities of color, women, refugees, LGBTQ populations, and other under-represented groups in global society. This course will focus selectively on the challenges and opportunities agents and actors within communities in countries face in improving the lives of their citizens and the roles social workers currently or possibly can play in solving or successfully addressing them. We will also address the ways in which community practice may be used either intentionally or unintentionally as agents of social control.

Families and Health (Public Health) SW727

Former Curriculum

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This course will examine families as a primary context for understanding health and health-related behaviors. Major topices include: 1) models and theories of the family, 2) history and current status of family-based practice, 3) the impact of demographic trends and their impact on family structure and functioning, 4) family diversity with respect to social status groups, ethnicity, and culture and their implications for understanding health phenomena, 5) families as the context for socialization to health beliefs and practices, 6) the provision of family-based care, and 7) health profiles of family members and their roles.

Practice Seminar in Child Maltreatment: Assessment and Treatment SW730

Former Curriculum

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This is a methods course intended to develop skills for child welfare practice, with special attention to child maltreatment. Students learn about the various contexts in which child welfare practice takes place and the skills and modalities that are used with children, youth, and families who are the focus of child welfare intervention. This course will prepare students to work with diverse client populations and will help them appreciate the imbalance of power between client and professional. Understanding the needs and responses of involuntary clients is an integral part of the course. Relevant evidence-based practices are taught and child welfare policies and practices are subjected to critical review. The first term will focus on assessment and the second on treatment.

Integrative Seminar SW732

Former Curriculum

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: Clinical Scholar and SW632
Course Description: This integrative seminar will focus on developing an integrative, professional e-portfolio that links classroom learning and field learning. The seminar will also continue to address cutting edge issues and evidence supported practices in working in integrated health behavioral health care settings.

Advanced Standing Peer Consultation Seminar SW737

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: Must be taken concurrently with SW 691
Course Description: This seminar is a course designed to provide opportunities for advanced standing students to learn the art of peer consultation. This course is open to students in any practice method concentration and practice area and is focused on providing students a safe milieu to process field related experiences with experienced faculty/student peer facilitators leading the sessions. Students will be provided opportunities to identify, link and document knowledge and skills across their educational, professional and personal experiences related to field. Students will explore their roles as learners, leaders and professionals as they uncover tacit knowledge and reflect on social justice principles.

Integrative Seminar: Child Maltreatment SW739

Former Curriculum

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Children & Youth Concentration or instructor's permission
Course Description: This integrative seminar will integrate micro and macro levels of practice; research in child welfare and related fields, as the research relates to all levels of practice; the relationship of child maltreatment and other social problems; and perspectives from several disciplines, specifically social work, other mental health professions, law, and medicine, as these disciplines address problems of child maltreatment and child welfare. The seminar will highlight issues of social justice, disproportionality-particularly the over-representation of children and families of color in the child welfare system, and diverse populations, including children in general and poor children in particular.

Issues in Global Social Work Practice—Re-Entry and Professional Practice SW748

Former Curriculum

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: SW 648
Course Description: This class is for students who have completed a global social work experience. It is designed to address: issues related to re-entry and integration of the international/global experience; differences between social work/social services in the United States and those in other cultural/national contexts; and next steps for seeking careers in global social work. This course is limited to students who: Have completed a global field placement or a global special studies; those returning from their assignment in the Peace Corps Masters International program; or those completing the Certificate in Global Social Work.

Disability Issues: Obstacles and Solution in Today's World SW773

Former Curriculum

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This course will examine the topic of disability from various perspectives, including the historical development of civil rights, the legal framework, the medical model, and how disability is viewed across various cultures. It will examine different types of disabilities, how people with disabilities are treated and denied equal access to programs and employment, and what political/legal recourse is available to address these inequities. The course will also review progress that has been made in the United States regarding the integration of people with disabilities by removing attitudinal and architectural, barriers that they face in daily life. The course will also address how to interact with individuals who have disabilities, the differences between visible and non-visible disabilities, and how disability can affect individuals depending on whether they are children, teenagers or adults. Issues pertaining to dimensions of diversity (e.g., ability, age, class, color, culture, ethnicity, family structure, gender [including gender identity and gender expression], marital status, national origin, race, religion or spirituality, sex, and sexual orientation) will be given special attention, particularly in areas of policy development and service delivery for people with disabilities.

Advanced Topics in Interpersonal Practice SW790

Former Curriculum

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This course presents advanced topics in interpersonal practice. The topics may include emerging practice methods, advanced application of methods covered in other required methods courses, and applications of methods in specific populations.

Advanced Topics in Macro Social Work SW799

Former Curriculum

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This course presents advanced topics in macro social work practice. The topics may include emerging macro practice issues and advanced application of specific methods.

Contact Us Press escape to close