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Class Descriptions

Counseling and Advocacy for LGBTQIA2S+ Youth SW726

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This course will introduce and address issues of concern to social work practice youth that identify as Transgender, Lesbian, Bisexual, Gay, Queer or questioning, focusing on the basic knowledge, practice and advocacy skills it takes to become increasingly competent in providing social work practice and advocacy for people who are in these marginalize, yet highly resilient, groups. From a strength-based perspective, this course will focus on basic social work knowledge and understanding of youth that identify as TBLGQ including the social injustice and stigma facing these groups. Related to TBLGQ youth, key areas of focus include how to advocate, affirm, engage, assess and effectively practice in a culturally responsive manner, while exploring risk and protective factors within the contexts of school, home, health care, and communities. This course will also address self-exploration and ethical dilemmas for social work providers with TBLGQ youth.

Families and Health (Public Health) SW727

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This course examines families as a primary context for understanding health and health-related behaviors. Major topics include: 1) substantive and ethical overview of families and health, 2) historical perspectives on the family, 3) demographic trends in family structure, 4) family diversity with respect to social class, race/ethnicity and culture, and sexual orientation and their implications for understanding health phenomena and family models and theories, 5) families as the context for socialization to health beliefs and practices, 6) the provision of family-based care, 7) health profiles of family members and family roles, and 8) family-based skills, programs, and practice concepts.

Family Violence Prevention and Intervention SW728

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This course introduces the fundamental knowledge and concepts for working with victims of all types of family violence. Students will learn about the factors that contribute to child abuse, teen dating violence, intimate partner violence, and elder abuse; the long term consequences family violence, and common treatment approaches. Interconnections between the forms of violence will be explored. Most family violence organizations work on multiple levels, such as macro, mezzo, and micro levels, and they frequently come into contact with a variety of fields of service, primarily the legal, health and mental health, housing, public assistance, and child welfare systems. Therefore, models of inter-system and interprofessional coordination will be presented. Federal and state policies related to family violence will be explored, and opportunities for advocacy will be highlighted.

Advanced Topics in Welfare of Children & Families SW729

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This course presents advanced topics in Welfare of Children & Families. The topics may include emerging practice issues and advanced application of specific methods.

Working with Self-help, Support, and Advocacy Groups SW730

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: Self-help and support groups, including 12-step mutual help groups, are common elements in health, mental health and substance abuse settings. The course will examine the services provided by these types of groups, as primary and adjunctive modes of intervention. Self-help services will be compared and contrasted with those provided by professional help system. Special attention will be given to how providers and their agencies can coordinate their activities with self-help groups. Ethical issues that arise in working with self-help groups is another important course topic. The course will examine the level of empirical support for a variety of self-help and support groups. Self-help participation will be examined by age, class, color, ethnicity, family structure, gender, race, religion or spirituality, immigrant or refugee status, and sexual orientation with a view toward mitigating disparities. The basic premise of the course is that working with experientially based self-help, support, and advocacy groups (including 12-step mutual help groups) offers opportunities to social workers and other behavioral and mental health professionals to increase their effectiveness. Many professionals already interact in various ways with self-help and mutual help groups and many more could do so if they were familiar with self-help knowledge and practices. The goal is to enhance provider competencies by exploring use best practices for coordinating with self-help/mutual help groups and fellowships.

Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Mood Disorders SW731

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This advanced action-based learning course will focus on direct practice and implementation of interpersonal psychotherapy for mood disorders. The focus of this course is on the concepts, theory, principles and practice to the assessment and interpersonal psychotherapy of adults and adolescents with mood disorders in a variety of practice settings. The course content reflects advanced material of current relevance for effective and evidence-based clinical social work practice. Specifically, this mini-course will provide updated training in the Interpersonal Psychotherapy treatment of mood disorders. This course will review diagnostic criteria and assessment, but will mainly focus on clinical skills and will be an interactive seminar type class.

Identifying Victims of Human Trafficking in Healthcare Settings SW733

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: Social workers and other service providers will gain an understanding what human trafficking is and how they can help victims of human trafficking that they encounter in their field of practice, with a particular emphasis on healthcare settings. We will explore the root causes of human trafficking, and our role in perpetuating and combating the underlying causes. We will take a critical perspective on what it means to help a victim of trafficking, as well-intentioned interventions can unwittingly cause the individual's arrest or deportation. Further, we will examine guiding principles for successful engagement with this population, including trauma-informed care, cultural awareness, and harm reduction. Finally, we will hear about local resources that providers can use if they suspect a client is a victim of human trafficking. In this course you will have the opportunity to develop an idea to solve this real world human rights problem. Teams are organizationally the functioning unit of the course. Students will work collaboratively across disciplines to create tools to increase identification of victims in health care settings. Class sessions will focus heavily on prototyping potential solutions and collaboratively generating ideas and next steps. Students will also be expected to spend significant time outside of class working in teams to reach out to relevant stakeholders, conduct research, draft documents, and otherwise work toward the creation of the intervention.

Family Psycho Education Interventions SW734

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This advanced action-focused learning course will focus on direct practice and implementation of multi-family psychoeducation (FPE) for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder including adults, adolescents, children and their families across the lifespan. A comparison of family psychoeducation groups and other similar methods will be explored. Emphasis will be given to practical application of therapy techniques and troubleshooting difficult and challenging clinical circumstances. This course will focus on developing the group work skills necessary to implement evidence-based multi-family psychoeducation interventions in work with adults, adolescents, children and their families. Special emphasis will be given to the family psychoeducation approach using multiple family groups in the treatment of severe psychiatric disorders. This course will examine the theoretical and empirical foundations for family psychoeducation, as well as, the practice of multifamily group treatment in schizophrenia, bi-polar illness, major depressive disorder, borderline personality disorder and with children and adolescents with serious mental illnesses. An overview of cultural considerations in family psychoeducation will also be provided.

CBT with OCD SW735

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This advanced action-based learning course will focus on direct practice and implementation of the cognitive-behavioral treatment for OCD. Several case examples will be utilized and students will engage in role-play and detailed class discussion focused on these techniques. Emphasis will be given to practical application of therapy techniques and troubleshooting difficult and challenging clinical cases. The course will also include strategies for enhancing adherence to behavioral homework exercises. An overview of empirically established cultural adaptations of CBT for OCD will also be provided.

CBT with Children and Adolescent Anxiety SW736

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This advanced action-based learning course will focus on direct practice and implementation of the cognitive-behavioral treatment with children and youth with anxiety disorders. Several case examples will be utilized and students will engage in role-play and detailed class discussion focused on these techniques. Emphasis will be given to practical application of therapy techniques and troubleshooting difficult and challenging clinical cases. The course will also include strategies for enhancing adherence to behavioral homework exercises. An overview of empirically established cultural adaptations of CBT with children and youth with anxiety disorders will also be provided.

Basic Skills for Dialectical Behavior Therapy SW737

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: DBT is an empirically supported treatment for individuals with severe emotionally regulation problems. Part of the treatment consists of teaching individuals specific skill sets in mindfulness, interpersonal effectiveness, emotional regulation and crisis management. This advanced action-based learning course will focus on direct practice and implementation of dialectical behavior therapy for borderline personality disorder and other psychiatric and psychological problems. This course will cover dialectical behavioral therapy approaches to address suicidal thoughts and actions, self-harm, emotion dysregulation, behavioral dysregulation, cognitive dysregulation, and self-dysregulation. Emphasis will be given to practical application of therapy techniques and troubleshooting difficult and challenging clinical circumstances. An overview of cultural considerations for dialectical behavioral therapy will also be provided.Students will learn an overview of these skills and strategies to integrate these skills into their clinical practice in a variety of individual and group therapy settings.

Rural Social Work SW738

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This course will examine practice theory and techniques relevant to social work in a rural setting. There are many definitions of what might be considered a rural community. For the purposes of this course, we will define communities as rural that have a population size of 2,500 to 20,000 with no major metropolitan area within hour of the community. Rural communities are often plagued with similar problems as vast metropolitan areas such as high poverty rates, inadequate housing, and inadequate access to health care. However, the scarcity of resources and professionals including medical providers, socio-economic underdevelopment, and physical distance from services and lack of public transportation are frequently identified as compounding factors of living in a rural community. The impact of differences in the key diversity dimensions such as ability, age, class, color, culture, ethnicity, family structure, gender (including gender identity and gender expression) marital status, national origin, race, religion or spirituality, sex, and sexual orientation will be examined, within the context of practicing in a rural community. This course will also emphasize issues of ethical practice as defined by the social work code of ethics within a rural community.

Social Work Practice in the Era of Fake News SW740

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: The term “post-truth,” the Oxford Dictionaries 2016 Word of the Year, reflects an era where everyone is a few clicks away from information that supports any goal, belief, or outcome desired whether or not that information is factual. Evaluating information and recognizing “fake news” is a critical skill for everyone. For social workers, advocates, policy makers, and others responsible for human well-being, it’s essential to find reliable data and other evidence to promote best practice and avoid the dangers of inaccurate information. Skill in locating and evaluating information can also help a practitioner work with clients and others who bring incorrect information into an interaction.

Interdisciplinary Problem Solving (Law) SW741

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: Through a team-based, experiential, and interdisciplinary learning model, small groups of U-M graduate and professional students work with faculty to explore and offer solutions to emerging, complex problems. This course is offered through the Law School’s Problem Solving Initiative and the topics vary by semester.

Policy & Political Social Work Simulation Lab SW742

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: In this course, students will participate in a simulation in which they will take on the role of policymakers, policy advocates, and community stakeholders. Students will be assigned a role, will research their character, and will engage with the other participants as that character throughout the duration of the simulation. Students will engage with each other in person as well as utilize an online platform to develop coalitions and attempt to sway those with differing positions to their side. Simulation topics vary by semester. The class may be taken multiple times for credit as long as a different topic is selected.

Attachment Theory in Clinical Practice with Adults SW743

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: Understanding the implications of early childhood relationships on adult functioning can provide a powerful framework for creating goals and intervention in adult psychotherapy. Using attachment theory as the foundation, this course will address relationship-based intervention with adults. Students will learn the role of attachment in the development and maintenance of cognitive, emotional and behavioral strategies that adults use to manage needs for autonomy and connection, in social, family and romantic relationships.

Adventure/Experiential Based Therapy SW744

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This one credit course will focus on the use of an experiential and adventure practice approach (theories, models, tools and techniques) for therapeutic purposes with individuals, groups and families. Students are expected to come with a foundational understanding of clinical work (in particular, some knowledge of clinical group facilitation), and experiential learning. Theoretical models of clinical experiential and adventure practice will be offered and discussed in tandem with clinical social work theories and models of practice. Evidence-based literature will be reviewed that promote nature-based, experiential and adventure interventions that build on strengths and resources of individuals and their families, and that integrate components of other evidence-based practices into the experiential and adventure methodologies. Inclusive and accessible practices will be discussed and demonstrated, especially due to the outdoor and natural setting involved and the physicality of many of the tools used in the approach.

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy SW745

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: ACT is an evidence-informed approach that utilizes acceptance, mindfulness strategies and commitment to engage clients in behavioral change strategies. This approach has been established as effective in treating clients with a variety of clinical diagnoses. This course will explore foundational ACT concepts as they apply to clinical assessment and clinical interventions with clients including self-acceptance, cognitive defusion, being present, self as context, values clarification and committed action.

Attachment Theory in Clinical Practice through the Lifespan SW746

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: Understanding the implications of childhood relationships on adult functioning can provide a powerful framework for creating goals and intervention in adult psychotherapy. Using attachment theory as the foundation, this course will address relationship-based intervention with adults. Students will learn the role of attachment in the development and maintenance of strategies that adults use to manage needs for autonomy and connection, in social, family and romantic relationships.

Social Work Practice in Higher Education SW747

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This mini course will provide an overview of social work practice in higher education settings and will cover micro, mezzo, and macro practice. Content will include how social work values, concepts and interventions are able to be applied in campus based settings. Course participants will explore the various opportunities to practice social work competencies using the interdisciplinary approach within the post-secondary education culture. Special attention will be given to the ways social workers are uniquely trained to respond to emergent issues and populations on college campuses including students in recovery, first generation college students, under-represented students, sexual misconduct policy and response and implementation of diversity equity and inclusion initiatives. This interactive course will use lecture, guest speakers/panelists, and group discussion to explore the roles social workers may hold on college campuses and how they adhere to social work values and ethics while also translating their skills to this unique setting.

HIV/AIDS Programs, Policies, Services SW748

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This mini-course will acquaint students with the basic and advanced facts about HIV/AIDS and sensitize students to the multitude of public health, social policy and social service delivery issues that AIDS presents, and provide US and global perspectives to HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention. Students will be sensitized to the special challenges AIDS presents for social work practice. Students will be presented with an approach to evidence based practice, and will review the state of HIV related evidence based prevention practice from national and global perspectives.

Advanced Topics in Policy & Political Social Work SW749

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This course presents advanced topics in Policy & Political Social Work. The topics may include emerging practice issues and advanced application of specific methods.

Photovoice SW750

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: Photovoice is a process in which people typically those with limited power due to poverty, language barriers, race, class, ethnicity, gender, culture, or other circumstances use video or photo images to document their environment and experiences and share them with others. It uses visual methods to communicate lived experience and to create a basis for discussion and action. The images are often used, with captions composed by the photographers, to bring the realities of the photographers lives home to the public and policy makers and to spur change. However, PhotoVoice can also be a method used direct practice, evaluation, and management settings. This course will cover basic methods for using Photovoice methods with individuals, groups, and communities. The course will provide an overview of the method and its application in different contexts, both domestic and intergenerational, and how visual images can be a powerful form of communication. This section of the class will include a walk through the School of Social Work's collection of documentary photography. The ethical dimensions of this method will also be covered. The remainder of the class will teach methods for photovoice and engage students in their own photovoice project. We will end with an exhibit of photos from the course that will take place in our School of Social Work.

Social Media & Social Change SW751

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This course teaches participants to use social media as a tool for community organizing. Participants will use the internet and social networks as easily integrated spaces designed to share information with peers and provide quick ways to organize communities and increase the reach of a group's voice. This minicourse covers the following topics: (1) Relationship building via Facebook & Twitter; (2) Facebook content for organizers; (3) Blogging hosts and content ideas; (4) Twitter content for organizers; (5) Use of video; (6) Mobile social networking; (7) Location-based social networks; (8) Online safety; (9) Discussions of: "safe" spaces online, online dialogue, and traditional organizing methods. Core competencies including critical thinking, social justice, and social equity are also examined and discussed in detail.

Intergroup Dialogues/Diversity, Dialogues & Social Justice SW752

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This course is designed to increase students awareness, knowledge, and understanding of issues related to diversity and social justice, including race, ethnicity, class, gender, religion, sexual orientation, age, ability status, and the intersections between these social identity groups. Additionally, students will gain an understanding of dialogue as a method for peacefully resolving conflict that may emerge due to cultural misunderstandings or oppressive dynamics, as well as skills for effectively engaging in dialogue. The topics of this course include social identity development; difference and dominance and the nature of social oppression; our personal and interpersonal connections to power, privilege, and oppression; understanding and resolving conflicts or resistance; the process of dialogue and coalition building across differences; and its applications in multicultural social work settings.

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