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Class Descriptions

Independent Studies: Community and Social Systems SW556

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

Intro to Com Org, Mgt & Policy/Eval Pract SW560

Former Curriculum

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This course is a social work foundation offering in methods for macro practice, specifically community organization, management, and policy advocacy. It is partly survey in nature, touching on a range of methods, strategies, and skills. It provides an appreciation of the historical and contemporary importance of these social work methods. The relevance of these methods to diverse populations and identities is addressed. Aspects of culturally sensitive and socially just practice are emphasized.

Independent Studies: Management of Human Services SW566

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

Independent Studies: Management of Human Services SW567

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

Topics in Disability Studies (Rackham) SW572

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: An Interdisciplinary approach to disability studies, including focus on the arts and humanities, natural and social sciences, and professional schools. Some topics include history and cultural representation of disability, advocacy, health, rehabilitation, built environment, independent living, public policy. Team taught with visiting speakers. Accessible classroom with realtime captioning.

Independent Studies: Social Policy and Evaluation SW576

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

Independent Studies: Social Policy and Evaluation SW577

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

Independent Studies: Mental Health SW581

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

Independent Studies: Mental Health SW582

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

Independent Studies: Research SW583

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

Independent Studies: Research SW584

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

Independent Studies: Evaluation SW586

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

Independent Studies: Evaluation SW587

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

Independent Studies: Social Work SW598

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

Independent Studies: Social Work SW599

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

Adolescent Development and Behavior SW601

Former Curriculum

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This course will examine the biological, psychological, interpersonal, and contextual changes and behaviors that characterize normal adolescent development. Within the context of normal adolescent development, the course content will focus on: 1) the epidemiology and etiology of adolescent problem behaviors; 2) the extent to which these behaviors vary across gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status; 3) the ways in which these behaviors relate to normal adolescent development; and 4) existing programs and policies designed to prevent and, to a lesser extent, treat problem behaviors.

Infant and Child Development and Behavior SW605

Former Curriculum

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This course will focus on biological, psychological, and social experiences, challenges, and changes characteristic of the first decade of life viewed from a multicultural perspective. "Normal" development, as well as the prevalence, etiology, and prevention of a variety of developmental risks will be reviewed. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of research and practice, with particular attention to the development of resiliency and social competence among infants and children. This course will also analyze how various environmental influences such as a parental behavior, poverty, and social justice impact infant and child development.

Social Change Theories SW611

Former Curriculum

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This course will review theories and research from the social sciences on social change, focusing especially at the societal level. Theories of social conflict, interest groups, and social movements, and such processes as consciousness-raising will be covered. Dynamics of the diffusion of innovations in society will also be addressed. Examples will be drawn from areas of practice in which social workers are involved, such as mental health and chemical dependency, child and family welfare, civil rights, health care, and consumer protection.

Behavioral, Psychosocial and Ecological Aspects of Health and Disease SW613

Former Curriculum

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This course will survey the distribution, determinants, and psychological and behavioral aspects of health and disease across the life span. Social, economic, environmental, and cultural variations in and determinants of health, disease, and quality of life will be addressed, including the influence of factors such as race, gender, sexual orientation, and biological and genetic factors. Barriers to access and utilization, geopolitical influences, environmental justice, social injustice and racism, historical trends, and future directions will be reviewed. Health beliefs and models of health behavior will be presented, including help-seeking and utilization of health services. Stress, coping and social support, adaptation to chronic illness, the influences of privilege, stigma and discrimination, quality of life, and death and dying will also be covered.

Adulthood and Aging SW616

Former Curriculum

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This course will examine psychosocial development and change across the adult lifespan. The focus will be on how various psychological factors influence development and change, as well as the impact of social factors on development and change in family and work roles from adulthood through old age. Special attention will be placed on similarities and differences in adult development and change related to an individual's position in society, including diverse dimensions such as ability, age, class, color, culture, ethnicity, family structure, gender (including gender identity and gender expression), marital status, national origin, race, religion or spirituality, sex, and sexual orientation.

Death, Loss and Grief SW617

Former Curriculum

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This course will address the theoretical framework of human loss and grief from a culturally and philosophically diverse perspective. Students will be provided with information about why and how humans grieve and how grieving is affected by type of loss, socioeconomic and cultural factors, individual personality and family functioning. Attention will be focused on life span development and the meaning of death and loss at different ages. Various types of loss will be discussed from an individual, family, and socio/cultural perspective. The importance of understanding trauma and its relationship to grief and loss will also be addressed. Coping and resiliency in loss will be explored, emphasizing the diversity of human response and focusing on the significance of social groups in integrating loss. The formation and practice of rituals, and diversity in religious and spiritual experience as a component of coping with loss will be discussed.

Research-Informed Practices to Prevent Substance Abuse in Racial and Ethnic Minority Adolescents SW618

Former Curriculum

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: Substance abuse represents a major public health concern facing American’s youth. Although all adolescents are directly or indirectly impacted by substance abuse, racial and ethnic minority youth are disproportionately impacted. Social workers play a key role in health promotion and disease prevention, including prevention, intervention and rehabilitation of substance abuse among racial and ethnic minority adolescents in urban settings. This course will draw from multiple disciplines, including social work, epidemiology, public health, psychology, policy and couple and family therapy, to introduce students to theory and knowledge on substance abuse to inform social work practice with racial and ethnic minority adolescents in urban settings. This course will be guided by models, and the theoretical frameworks which inform them, that have been shown to be efficacious or effective in prevention, intervention, and rehabilitation of substance abuse in adolescents. Therefore, students will be introduced to research-informed substance abuse practices among racial and ethnic minority urban adolescents. For the purposes of this course, substance abuse will include both licit and illicit substances. Students will be asked to demonstrate the ways in which to apply research-informed theory and knowledge in practice settings with racial and ethnic minority urban adolescents.

Orientation Seminar for Community Scholars: Social Work in Diverse Communities SW622

Former Curriculum

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: This course will provide an orientation to community organization as a field of practice and educational program in the School of Social Work, with special emphasis on the Community Scholars Program (CSP). It will examine core concepts, practice methods, curricular competencies and course content, including CSP as a special program for building capacity and creating change at the community level in Detroit neighborhoods and other urban and rural areas nationwide.

Interpersonal Practice with Families SW623

Former Curriculum

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: SW 521/permission of instructor
Course Description: This course will build on the content presented in course SW 521 (i.e. Interpersonal Practice with Individuals, Families and Small Groups). This course will present a theoretical analysis of family functioning and integrate this analysis with social work practice. Broad definitions of "family" will be used, including extended families, unmarried couples, single parent families, gay or lesbian couples, adult siblings, "fictive kin," and other inclusive definitions. Along with theories and knowledge of family structure and process, guidelines and tools for engaging, assessing, and intervening with families will be introduced. The most recent social science theories and evidence will be employed in guiding family assessment and intervention. This course will cover all stages of the helping process with families (i.e. engagement, assessment, planning, evaluation, intervention, and termination). During these stages, client-worker differences will be taken into account including a range of diversity dimensions such as ability, age, class, color, culture, ethnicity, family structure, gender (including gender identity and gender expression), marital status, national origin, race, religion or spirituality, sex, and sexual orientation. Various theoretical approaches will be presented in order to help students understand family structure, communication patterns, and behavioral and coping repertoires. The family will also be studied as part of larger social systems, as having its own life cycles, and as influencing multiple generations. An overview will be given of current models of practice.

Interpersonal Practice with Groups SW624

Former Curriculum

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: SW 521/permission of instructor
Course Description: This course builds on the content presented in SW521 and the other foundation courses and focuses on the processes of intervention and individual change groups. Particular attention will be given to the recruitment and composition of group members, leadership structure of small groups, phases of group development, and such group processes as decision-making, tension reduction, conflict resolution, goal setting, contracting, and evaluation. Students will learn how to assess and address group problems such as scapegoating, member resistance, low morale, over-active deviance, etc. They will learn to employ a variety of intra-group strategies and techniques such as programs, structured activities, exercises, etc. Theories and methods consistent with the achievement of social justice through group work practice will be emphasized. The course will also consider how gender, ethnicity, race, social class, sexual orientation, and different abilities will impact on various aspects of group functioning such as purpose, composition, leadership, selection of intervention strategies, and group development.

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