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School of Social Work News

  1. Karla  Goldman
     
    Karla Goldman Examines the Culture of Silence in Reform Judaism

    Professor Karla Goldman’s op-ed in Lilth asks what can be expected from Reform Judaism in the wake of reports of sexual discrimination released by the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion (HUC) in Cincinnati. Goldman shares her own personal history as the first tenure-track woman faculty member on the HUC’s Cincinnati campus, and describes her lawsuit against HUC for wrongful dismissal based on gender bias. 

    “As a historian of women in Reform Judaism, I have studied Reform’s very real commitment to women’s advancement within Judaism together with its century-long pattern of combining strong rhetoric on female equality with a reality of subordination and exclusion,” writes Goldman. “I knew this culture and its silencing all too well.”

    https://lilith.org/articles/after-the-fall-retelling-the-story-of-reform-judaism/

    • June 17, 2022
  2.  
    New Legislative Action Happening in East Lansing and Washington, D.C.

    Thanks in part to actions by the Joint Task Force on Stipends (JTFOS), Payments for Placement (P4P), other schools of social work in Michigan, and NASW-Michigan, we have encouraging news of legislative action happening in East Lansing and Washington, D.C. 

    In the Michigan legislature, Senate Bill 1012, which calls for the creation of a new Student Mental Health Apprenticeship Retention and Training (SMART) program, has passed the senate. The SMART program would provide state funds for field education stipends for students placed in public school settings providing the students agree to a term of service in public schools after graduation. This legislation has gone to the house, where it has been referred to the Committee on Health Policy.

    In addition, the state legislature is considering budget amendments (Sections 1996 - 2000) that would increase and enhance the behavioral health workforce in Michigan. These crucial investments would bring hundreds of new professionals into communities across Michigan over the next three years through investing in students, training and research.

    In Washington, new legislation to increase Medicare reimbursement rates for clinical social workers has been introduced in both chambers of Congress. The Improving Access to Mental Health Act is part of a comprehensive mental health reform legislative package and was introduced by Senator (and MSW) Debbie Stabenow (D-MI)  and Senator John Barrasso (R-WY). 

    • June 16, 2022
  3. Stacy L. Peterson
     
    Stacy Peterson Receives the 2022 Distinguished Lecturer Award

    Field Faculty and Lecturer Stacy Peterson has received the 2022 Distinguished Lecturer Award. For more than twenty years, her exceptional dedication and commitment to social work values have made a positive impact on both students and the field. Peterson has presented at multiple national Council on Social Work Education conferences on innovative field practices.

    "Thank you for this wonderful recognition of my work. It is an honor and privilege to be in the company of great leaders and teachers. I am passionate about my work and use the core values of social work (service, social justice, dignity and worth of the person, importance of human relationships, integrity and competence) as a compass in my teaching and serving.  I appreciate this acknowledgment and in these tumultuous times, I remain inspired and hopeful that we can contribute to healing our world." 

     
    • May 26, 2022
  4. Ashley E. Cureton
     
    Ashley Cureton is the 2022 Student Union Teacher of the Year

    Assistant Professor Ashley Cureton has been named 2022 Student Union Teacher of the Year. This award is given by the School of Social Work students and recognizes faculty who have demonstrated commitment to improving DEI, made an outstanding and positive contribution to the School’s climate, and whose skills, dedication, understanding and caring have made a positive impact on students.

    "I find teaching to be a profoundly rewarding experience. In fact, I believe I have the best job on the planet (SSW students are the best!). With the philosophy that education functions as a practice of freedom (as the late bell hooks said), I embrace a progressive, holistic, co-learning and engaged pedagogy with the adoption of cultural diversity in the classroom context. Freedom in education allows me to embrace the performative acts associated with teaching, offer a space for change, invention, and spontaneous shifts and serve as a catalyst to draw out thoughtful and critical discussions among students."

    • May 26, 2022
  5. Daphne C. Watkins
     
    Daphne Watkins Receives 2022 Distinguished Faculty Award

    Professor Daphne Watkins has received the 2022 Distinguished Faculty Award. Watkins is a University Diversity and Social Transformation Professor who studies behavioral interventions for historically marginalized groups, mixed methods approaches to research in context, and leadership development and organizational structures. She is the Director of the Vivian A. and James L. Curtis School of Social Work Center for Health Equity and Research Training. 

    "The SSW Distinguished Faculty Award means a lot to me. As someone trained in anthropology and public health, this acknowledgment speaks to the respect my colleagues have for the interdisciplinary nature of my work and what I bring to the School. Social work has been my home for well over a decade, but not without some uncertainty on my part. Early in my career, I wondered if I could truly embody social work’s values in my research, teaching and service. This award confirms I am not only working hard to represent the School in a positive light globally and domestically but that the faculty see me, respect my efforts and are proud to have me as a colleague.” 

    • May 26, 2022
  6.  
    Faculty Promotions

    Congratulations to the following faculty members whose promotions were approved by the U-M Board of Regents last night: Jaclynn HawkinsShanna Kattari and Addie Weaver were promoted to associate professor with tenure. Shawna Lee, Matt Smith and Karen Staller were promoted to professor. Earlier this spring, Rick Barinbaum and Daphne Brydon were promoted to Lecturer II and Yatesha Robinson to Lecturer IV.

  7.  
    2022 School of Social Work Innovations Award Recipients

    The inaugural Innovation in Research and Teaching Award recognizes research — with either incremental innovation that builds over time, with its impact to be felt in the future, radical Innovations that current issues in the moment they occur and disruptive innovation that challenges the status quo — or existing theories, methods, and pedagogies.

    • May 6, 2022
  8.  
    Child Welfare Student Association Visited Michigan State Capitol

    The Child Welfare Student Association visited the Michigan state capitol on April 25 to mark National Child Abuse Prevention Month. The students listened to inspirational speakers, networked with legislators and took a tour of the capitol building.

    • May 3, 2022
  9. Daicia R. Price
     
    Daicia Price Recognized by WCC Foundation Women's Council

    The work and achievements of Clinical Assistant Professor Daicia Price will be recognized at the 2022 WCC Foundation Women's Council Celebration of Women's Leadership—a virtual event on Wednesday, May 25 at 5 PM. The award honors women who have made significant contributions to the Washtenaw County community.

  10. Terri L. Friedline
     
    Terri Friedline Advocates for Postal Banking as a Way to Advance Racial Equity

    Associate Professor Terri Friedline’s op-ed in The Emancipator on how reviving post office banking could advance racial equity. “More than 60 million Americans – one-fifth of the population – live in communities without a bank. They’re left either to travel long distances to handle their money or use more expensive nearby options like check-cashing companies, payday lenders and currency exchanges,” writes Friedline. Boston University’s Center for Antiracist Research and The Boston Globe’s Opinion team are collaborating to resurrect and reimagine The Emancipator, the first abolitionist newspaper in the United States, founded more than 200 years ago.

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