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School of Social Work News

  1. M. Candace Christensen
     
    M. Candace Christensen Named a U-M Public Engagement Faculty Fellow

    Associate Professor M. Candace Christensen has been named a Public Engagement Faculty Fellow by the U-M Office of the Vice President for Research.  The fellowship offers an opportunity for faculty members to consider how they can prioritize outward engagement in their scholarly activity and translate it into meaningful public impacts.

    “My vision for who I want to be as a professional scholar in 5-10 years is to be exceptionally proficient at translating my own research, but also a guide, mentor, and leader for translating research into accessible, engaging, practical, and useful knowledge,” said Christensen. “The Public Engagement Faculty Fellowship will provide me with the mentorship, social networks, skills, and resources to achieve these goals.”

  2.  
    Six School of Social Work Professors Selected as SSWR Conference Cluster Co-Chairs

    Six School of Social Work Professors have been selected to serve as cluster co-chairs for the Society for Social Work and Research (SSWR) Annual Conference. Cluster chairs play a significant role in the abstract review and development of the abstract-based program content for the SSWR annual conference.

    Associate Professor Lindsay Bornheimer — Mental Health cluster

    Assistant Professor James Ellis — Black and African Diaspora Focused-Research cluster

    Assistant Professor Odessa Gonzalez Benson — Race and Ethnicity cluster

    Associate Professor Shanna Kattari — Gender cluster

    Associate Professor Kathryn Maguire-Jack — Inequality, Poverty, and Social Welfare Policy cluster

    Associate Professor Camille Quinn — Black and African Diaspora Focused-Research cluster

  3.  
    MSW Students Claudia Abboud and Cora Galpern Talk with PBS About Voting “Uncommitted”

    MSW students Claudia Abboud and Cora Galpern spoke with PBS’s NewsHour about the option to vote “uncommitted” in last week’s state primary election. “I don’t think we have a whole lot of ways to really make sure that our voices are being heard,” Abboud said. “But this is one direct way that we can, that we have some power we can leverage, that we can do something and communicate what our wants and our needs are directly to the source.”

  4. Greer Hamilton
     
    Greer Hamilton Selected as an Agent of Change Fellow

    Research Fellow Greer Hamilton, PhD ’23, has been selected as an Agent of Change Fellow. Sponsored by the Environmental Health News and Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, the program is designed to empower emerging leaders from historically excluded backgrounds in science and academia to reimagine solutions for a just and healthy planet.

  5. Shanna Katz Kattari
     
    Shanna Kattari Discusses Polyamory in USA Today

    Associate Professor Shanna Kattari spoke with USA Today about polyamory, the changing attitudes towards monogamy and increased interest in different relationship styles. "The more that even monogamous people are willing to learn and educate themselves about polyamory, the better it is for everyone," said Kattari.

  6.  
    Black Radical Healing Pathways Receives 2024 MLK Spirit Award

    The School of Social Work student group Black Radical Healing Pathways (BRHP) received a 2024 Central Campus MLK Spirit Award. MSW students Kareem Isaac, Rhianna Womack, Ataia Templeton and Kyra Smith accepted the award on behalf of BRHP; they would also like to credit alumni Joseph “Jojo” Pearson-Green, MSW ’23, and Syncere Ellis, MSW ’23, who were on the leadership team last semester.

    BRHP aspires to organize, educate, mobilize and empower Black students to work for transformative changes on campus, neighborhood and communities. Their focus is to nourish and cultivate the fighting spirits, critical consciousness and aesthetics of Black students.

    The Central Campus Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Spirit Award program honors undergraduates, graduate students, and student groups on Central Campus who best exemplify the leadership and extraordinary vision of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

  7.  
    Shanna Katari Speaks with Marketplace About Job Discrimination Faced by Transgender People

    Associate Professor Shanna Katari spoke with NPR’s Marketplace about job discrimination and the role it plays in the higher rates of economic hardship that transgendered people face in the U.S. “So it might not be something as explicit as ‘I’m not hiring you because you’re trans,’ but ‘I’m not hiring you because you don’t match my idea of what a woman should look like,’” they said.

  8. Daicia R. Price
     
    Daicia Price Speaks with Local New Live on Social Media and Loneliness

    Associate Clinical Professor Daicia Price spoke with Gray TV’s Local News Live about social media and loneliness. “Social Media has a role in our society,” she said, “but it is not a replacement for those intimate connections that people probably were really desiring.”

  9. Shanna Katz Kattari
     
    Shanna Kattari Interviewed on PBS NewsHour Weekend

    Associate Professor Shanna Kattari was interviewed on PBS NewsHour Weekend in a segment on the challenges of love and dating while living with disabilities.

    “I think nondisabled people really buy into a lot of the notions that have been perpetuated around disability and disabled people, such as disabled folks are all asexual, which is not true,” said Kattari. “There is this idea that we should feel grateful to be asked on a date or grateful to be partnered with, which is totally not the case.”

  10. So'Phelia Morrow
     
    So’Phelia Morrow Writes in the New York Amsterdam News About Abuse and Finding Hope

    PhD student So’Phelia Morrow describes in a New York Amsterdam News editorial how seeing a squirrel chasing a butterfly sparked hope and inspired her to leave an abusive partner.

    “The moment lasted only a second, but it was long enough for me to receive the message,” she wrote. “Although I never thought much about butterflies before, at that moment, I saw it as hope. I laughed to myself. Hope was flying in front of me. Change was going to come.”

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