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Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Events

  1. CASC + ENGAGE: Racial equity Washtenaw county CASC + ENGAGE: Racial equity Washtenaw county  »

    September 17, 2020 - 12:00pmCancelled

    It is essential to connect our critical analysis of social justice issues to multi-level collective action for systemic and institutional change. Join us on September 17, from 12 pm-1:30 pm, for a special joint-session in partnership with CASC to explore how racial and socioeconomic inequity in Washtenaw County is connected to historic and ongoing discriminatory policies and practices. Hear from CASC and social work alumni engaged in fighting for equity in Washtenaw County, including Clinical Assistant Professor and Washtenaw County Commissioner, Justin Hodge, CASC alumni and Communications and Public Relations Specialist of the Washtenaw County Intermediate School District, Ashley Kryscynski, among others.  Associate Professor and CASC Director Katie Richards-Schuster, and CASC Assistant Director Amber Wiliams, will also join us to share how we move from critical analysis to action for equitable change.

    Attending this session provides field credit. Please document your attendance and contact your field faculty supervisor for information.

    This session is eligible for CE Contact Hours.

    RSVP

  2. A Glorious and Inclusive Welcome with Common Roots A Glorious and Inclusive Welcome with Common Roots »

    September 16, 2020 - 5:00pm to 7:00pm

    Join Common Roots in this orientation where we celebrate individuals with identities that have been historically underrepresented. This will be an opportunity to get to know your peers, share challenges, success, and envision our collective hopes and dreams.

    Watch this video to learn more!

    RSVP

  3. Debrief: What can we do? »

    September 11, 2020 - 12:00pm

    With our power, resources, and knowledge - what can we do about water injustice as a school? All discussions and ideas are welcome - whether it be proposing new field placements that focus on water and environmental justice, integrating more course content on how water injustice is tied to systemic and historic discrimination, or current advocacy efforts demanding access to safe, clean, water is a human right.

    Attending this session provides field credits. Please document your attendance and contact your field faculty supervisor for information.

    RSVP

  4. POSTPONED CEW + Advocacy Symposium: Rogério M. Pinto Lightning Talk 
POSTPONED CEW + Advocacy Symposium: Rogério M. Pinto Lightning Talk  »

    September 10, 2020 - 2:30pmCancelled

    CEW+ Advocacy Symposium has postponed this event. The new event will appear on this calendar.  

    Rogério M. Pinto and the Faculty Allies for Diversity received the Carol Hollenshead Inspire Award for Excellence in Promoting Equity and Social Change. Pinto will present a lightening talk, Diversity Matters: How about Equity and Inclusion?, during the CEW+ Advocacy Symposium.

    The 2020 Symposium includes a diverse group of scholars and community practitioners who embody leadership in varied ways as they advocate for change. Dr. Martha Jones will discuss the role of Black women in the civil rights and voting rights movements and the ongoing struggle for voting rights for different populations. This year’s Symposium will take place virtually as a series of presentations and workshops that will take place over the course of the academic year. At the kickoff event, 2020 CEW+ Inspire Awardees will present lightning talks about their work as a precursor to a full-length workshop that will happen later in the academic year as a component of the Symposium. The learning opportunities throughout the year-long Symposium will supplement Democracy and Debate Theme Semester coursework and activities.

    This symposium is free and open to all activists, advocates, and allies from all U-M campuses (students, staff, faculty) as well as the local community.

    Register

  5. Water Warriors from Flint to Detroit Water Warriors from Flint to Detroit »

    September 10, 2020 - 12:00pm

    Join the ENGAGE team for a discussion featuring prominent water justice activists Monica Lewis Patrick and Bryce Detroit to discuss their work, how water injustice is tied to historic and systemic discrimination, and how lack of access to clean, safe water has exacerbated our current public health crises

    Monica Lewis Patrick is Chief Executive Officer of We the People Detroit and a long-time water justice advocate.

    Bryce Detroit is CEO and Founder of Detroit Recordings LLC and a long-time water justice advocate.

    Attending this session provides field credits. Please document your attendance and contact your field faculty supervisor for information.

    This session is approved for CE Contact Hours.

    Watch the Recording Here

  6. Undoing Racism Workgroup Meeting Undoing Racism Workgroup Meeting »

    September 3, 2020 - 12:00pm to 2:00pm

    We will be kicking off our first meeting of the fall semester! Join us to build community collaboration and continue the conversation about anti-racist practice. A Zoom link will be sent out to those who RSVP.

    RSVP Here »

  7. SSW Book Club »

    July 8, 2020 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

    The SSW Book Club will meet at noon via Zoom.

    You are welcome to join us, whether or not you have attended before, and whether or not you completed the book.

  8. Undoing Racism Meeting Undoing Racism Meeting »

    June 17, 2020 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm

    Please join us at the next Undoing Racism workgroup meeting to build collective community and continue our efforts to organize and implement anti-racist practice in the SSW. All students, staff, and faculty are welcome! A zoom link will be sent out before the meeting to those who register.

    RSVP Here »

  9. SSW Book Club »

    May 19, 2020 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

    The SSW Book Club will meet via Zoom to discuss Separated, by Dr. William Lopez.

    The book examines immigration law enforcement, focusing on one raid in Washtenaw County.

    You are welcome to join us, whether or not you have attended before, and whether or not you have finished the book.

    All members of the SSW community are invited. A Zoom link will be sent the morning of the discussion. (If needed, email Betsy Williams, David Pratt, or Joe Galura for the link.) 

  10. 25th Annual Lavender Graduation »

    April 30, 2020 - 4:30pm to 7:00pm

    Lavender Graduation is a celebration of LGBTQ graduates at the University of Michigan. Graduates from any school/college in the University from any academic level are welcome to participate. All participating graduates will receive a FREE rainbow 2020 tassel, lavender cords, and a Lavender Degree! Families, students, faculty, and staff are all welcome to join the celebration.  Light appetizers will be served after the ceremony.

  11. Virtual Discussion on COVID-19 Stigma: Detroit »

    April 23, 2020 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm

    This week we will have several special guests from Detroit at our conversation on Identity and Vulnerabilities in the time of COVID-19: 

    Ayesha Ghazi-Edwin: LEO Lecturer, School of Social Work

    Alicia McCormick: Youth Development Director, Urban Neighborhood Initiatives

    Dillon Cathro: Director of Youth Organizing, Urban Neighborhood Initiatives  

    Zachary Rowe: Executive Director, Friends Of Parkside

    Sonia Harb: Special Advisor on Detroit Engagement for the Office of the Provost

    Reverend Charles Williams: MSW candidate, Chair of the National Action Network in Michigan.

    Fatima Salman: Program Coordinator, ENGAGE: Detroit

    Undrea V. Goodwin: Public Health Project Coordinator, SEMHAC

    Guests will contribute their perspective from Detroit, an epicenter of the pandemic and will join us in a conversation on how multiple personal identities make us more or less vulnerable to the virus and to its associated stigma and inequities. This follows on conversations the Faculty Allies for Diversity have been having for the past four weeks on social consequences of the pandemic. For the next few weeks, we will invite guests to speak on issues concerning other areas (New Orleans, Brazil) hard hit by COVID-19. Please join us!

     

    RSVP

  12. Emanuel Film Screening & Discussion »

    April 16, 2020 - 4:00pmCancelled

    The compelling documentary centers on the aftermath of the 2015 fatal shooting of nine African-American church members at the historic Mother Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston, S.C.; namely, the public forgiveness by the families of the victims and the survivors of Dylann Roof, the 21-year-old white supremacist convicted of the killings. This act of grace ushered a way forward in healing their city — and the entire nation. A facilitated discussion will follow the 90-minute film. Refreshments will be provided. 

    Campus partners include the Center for the Education of Women, North Campus Research Complex, Trotter Multicultural Center, and U-M Voices of Staff – Advancing Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Team. Michigan Medicine partners include Fast Forward Medical Innovation, Medical School Executive Administration, Medical School Faculty Development, Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research, Office for Health Equity and Inclusion, and Rogel Cancer Center.

    RSVP Here »

     

  13. Virtual Discussion on COVID-19 Stigma: Special Guest Charles Sanky, MD Candidate from Icahn School of Medicine, Mt. Sinai Hospital, New York City »

    April 16, 2020 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm

    Dear Social Work Community:

    This week we will have special guest at our conversation on stigma in the time of COVID-19: Charles Sanky, MD Candidate from Icahn School of Medicine, Mt. Sinai Hospital, New York City.

    Charles will contribute his perspective from New York City the epicenter of the pandemic and will join us in a conversation on how multiple personal identities make us more or less vulnerable to the virus and to its associated stigma and inequities. This follows on conversations the Faculty Allies for Diversity have been having for the past four weeks on social consequences of the pandemic. For the next few weeks, we will invite guests to speak on issues concerning other areas (Detroit, New Orleans) hard hit by COVID-19. Please join us!

    Facilitator: Rogério M. Pinto 

    Faculty Allies Co-Chairs Rogério Pinto and Addie Weaver

    Faculty Allies members: Trina Shanks, Todd Herrenkohl, David Córdova and Lorraine Gutiérrez

    DEI Director Larry Gant

    We look forward to having a robust discussion.

  14. Virtual Discussion on COVID-19: Identity and Intersectionalities »

    April 9, 2020 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm

    Dear Social Work Community:

    For the past two weeks, the Faculty Allies for Diversity (FAD) in collaboration with the Office of Diversity, Inclusion and Equity (DEI), has held social support virtual conversations among those individuals wishing to prevent and stop stigmatization and all issues arising from the COVID-19 pandemic. The April 9 conversation will add a focus on identity and intersectionality.

    Please join:

    Facilitator: Rogério Pinto 

    Faculty Allies Co-Chairs Rogério Pinto and Addie Weaver

    DEI Director Larry Gant

    Faculty Allies members: Trina Shanks, Todd Herrenkohl, David Córdova and Lorraine Gutiérrez

    We look forward to having a robust discussion

  15. SSW Book Club »

    April 8, 2020 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

    The SSW Book Club will meet via Zoom to discuss a short novel by Louise Erdrich, The Birchbark House.

    This novel for young readers tells a family story of an Ojibwa girl, starting in 1847 near Lake Superior.

    You are welcome to join us, whether or not you have attended before, and whether or not you have finished the book.

    All members of the SSW community are invited. Please email Betsy Williams, David Pratt, or Joe Galura for the Zoom link.

  16. Virtual Discussion on COVID-19: Stigma, Physical Distancing, and Solidarity »

    April 2, 2020 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm

    Dear Social Work Community:

    For the past two weeks, the Faculty Allies for Diversity (FAD) in collaboration with the Office of Diversity, Inclusion and Equity (DEI), has held social support virtual conversations among those individuals wishing to prevent and stop stigmatization and all issues arising from the COVID-19 pandemic. The April 2nd conversation will add a focus on physical distancing and solidarity.

    Please join:

    Facilitator: Rogério Pinto 

    Faculty Allies Co-Chairs Rogério Pinto and Addie Weaver

    DEI Director Larry Gant

    Faculty Allies members: Trina Shanks, Todd Herrenkohl, David Córdova and Lorraine Gutiérrez

    We look forward to having a robust discussionCOVID-19: Stigma, Physical Distancing, and Solidarity

  17. Free the Mind: Wellness Fair »

    April 1, 2020 - 12:00pm to 2:00pmCancelled

    Come take an opportunity to relax and unwind at the Free the Mind Wellness Fair! The fair will feature self-care activities, games, healthy snacks, and on-campus resources that support wellness. 

     

    Co-sponsored by Mental Health Matters, the Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion and Office of Student Services.

  18. Truth in Sentencing Town Hall »

    March 28, 2020 - 1:00pm to 3:30pmCancelled

    Learn about and discuss ways to bring back good/earned time credits within the Michigan prison system with local and state legislators. Featured Panelists include Senator Jeff Irwin, Senator Sylvia Santana and more!

    RSVP Here »

  19. Celebrating Student Action Toward Campus & Community Change Celebrating Student Action Toward Campus & Community Change »

    March 17, 2020 - 12:00pm to 2:00pmCancelled

    The following lecture is in the spirit of the CASC Minor 10 Year Anniversary theme: Celebrating Student Action Toward Campus & Community Change. The program will present discussion and reflection about the influence of student led action in shifting societal culture, and transforming institutions of higher education. Led by public speaker, human rights activist and educator  Kim Katrin, the session will explore important issues, approaches, and challenges in student led social action including intersectional organizing, allyship and co-resistance, coalition building, and fostering institutional change. The session will conclude with a reaction and conversation from Michelle Saboo, and U-M School of Social Work and CASC Minor alumnas, followed by question and answer.

     Kim Katrin is an internationally acclaimed award winning educator, writer, artist & consultant. Recognized stateside as one of The Root's' Young Feminists to Watch', celebrated in Canada as 2016’s National Youth Role Model and nationally as one of the 50 Most Loved Gay Canadians. As an educator, Kim travels around the world talking to people about justice, equity, and human rights. One of the most fundamental things she shares is a reframing of the golden rule. The golden rule suggests that we should treat other people the way that we want to be treated. That might seem simple enough, but it assumes that there is a standard for other people’s experiences. Instead, she encourages audiences to treat people the way they want to be treated, which means we have to ask.

    A passionate speaker, Kim is dedicated to intersectionality and invested in arousing a sense of curiosity and empathy in her audience. She uniquely weaves together the historical context, statistical analysis, as well as current events. She is a dynamic speaker, invested in the issues and inspiring in her approach to solutions. By focusing on small meaningful actions and choices, she makes creating large scale change accessible. A public researcher, consultant and human rights educator, she has shared hundreds of unique resources and presentations around issues including race, ability & gender. As a social entrepreneur, she speaks to the opportunities and challenges for women in business and leadership roles. With great openness, she welcomes difficult conversations hosting community dialogues and sharing practical strategies around ‘Sexuality & Consent’, ‘Queer & Trans Allyship’ and ‘Anti­Racism & Equity’.

     

    Michelle Saboo (Namadabiwin Gaagaagi) is a citizen of the Bay Mills Indian Community. She is an advocate for educational access for Indigenous students and has worked in a variety of areas in education, including tribal college administration, pre-college programming, multicultural affairs, admissions, and academic advising. In her work she seeks to broaden the lens of how student success is viewed and achieved.

    Through prioritizing Anishinaabe gikendaasowin (knowing), izhichigewin (doing), enawendiwin (relating), and gidakiiminaan (connecting to the land), Michelle believes that the route to student success is possible by supporting students in a holistic manner. She knows that our Indigenous nations can become as healthy as they were prior to colonization. For our nations to thrive, we must support one another to thrive as students, parents, families, and communities. Michelle received her Bachelor of Arts in American Culture with an emphasis in Native American studies and her Master of Social Work degree from the University of Michigan. She currently resides in Bemijigamaag with her partner and two children.

    RSVP Here »

    This event is co-sponsored by the Community Action and Social Change Undergraduate Minor, and SSW Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

  20. Common Roots Meet + Mixer Common Roots Meet + Mixer »

    March 13, 2020 - 6:00pm to 8:00pmCancelled

    Common Roots invites you to join them for a fun, food-filled mixer with student organizations of color at the School of Social Work! The hope is to foster community building, collaboration, and networking opportunities for different student organizations and their leaders.
    
    RSVP Here »

    *Common Roots is a committee consisting of representatives from the SSW’s Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, the LatinX Social Work Coalition, Black Radical Healing Pathways, Association of Black Social Workers, the Office of Student Services, the Asian Pacific Islander Coalition and other SSW students.

  21. The Cognitive Costs of Environmental Racism: Myth, Science and Myopia »

    March 11, 2020 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm

    Please join the University of Michigan MLK Health Sciences Committee and the Institute for Social Research as we host author and ethicist Harriet A. Washington on March 11 for a presentation and discussion on her book "A Terrible Thing to Waste: Environmental Racism and its Assault on the American Mind." 

    Harriet A. Washington has been the Shearing Fellow at the University of Nevada's Black Mountain Institute, a Research Fellow in Medical Ethics at Harvard Medical School, and a senior research scholar at the National Center for Bioethics at Tuskegee University. She is the author of Deadly Monopolies, Infectious Madness, and Medical Apartheid, which won a National Book Critics Circle Award, the PEN/Oakland Award, and the American Library Association Black Caucus Nonfiction Award.  

    Does the dose make the poison? Are US patterns of environmental toxicity driven by socioeconomics or race? Are hereditarian scientists correct in ascribing intelligence to racial genetics? How have our habitual modes of thought blinded us to the true nature of environmental toxicity, and what challenges face public health practitioners as they assess the roles of industry, science and government?

    RSVP Here »

  22. SSW Book Club »

    March 4, 2020 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Saeed Jones is an acclaimed queer Black poet.

    The SSW Book Club will discuss his coming of age memoir, How We Fight for Our Lives.

    You are welcome to join us, whether or not you have attended before, and whether or not you have finished the book.

    All members of the SSW community are invited. Feel free to bring your lunch.

  23. Healing from Racial Trauma: Lessons from a Public Health Intervention Healing from Racial Trauma: Lessons from a Public Health Intervention »

    February 24, 2020 - 3:00pm to 5:00pm

    For youth and adults of color, prolonged exposure to racial discrimination may result in debilitating psychological, behavioral, and health outcomes. To help their children prepare for and prevent the deleterious consequences of discrimination, many parents of color utilize racial socialization, or communication about racialized experiences. Given heightened awareness to discrimination plaguing Black communities, better understanding of how racial socialization processes and skills development can help youth and parents heal from the effects of past, current, and future racial trauma is important. Greater racial socialization competency is proposed as achievable through intentional and mindful practice, thus, this workshop will explore theories and practices important in the healing processes of racial trauma. 

    This event is being co-sponsored by the School of Education and the School of Social Work.

    RSVP Here »

  24. LGBTQ Health and Wellness Week Tension and Trauma Releasing Exercises Workshop »

    February 6, 2020 - 6:00pm to 7:30pm

    Join us for a LGBTQ Health and Wellness Week event focused on tension and trauma releasing excersices (TRE). TRE can help release muscular tension, reduce stress and calm the nervous system. 

  25. Queer Martyrdom: The Religious and Sexual Politics of LGBTQ Inclusion with Dr. Brett Krutzsch »

    February 5, 2020 - 6:30pm to 7:30pm

    LGBTQ activists have tried to make particular people into martyrs for political purposes. Some "martyrs" like Matthew Shepard have been successful, while others like F.C. Martinez have not. Those reasons have much to do with race, gender, class, and religion. This topic looks at several examples from mainstream media to think about LGBTQ acceptance in the United States.

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