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  1. Terri L. Friedline
     
    Terri Friedline Advocates for Postal Banking as a Way to Advance Racial Equity

    Associate Professor Terri Friedline’s op-ed in The Emancipator on how reviving post office banking could advance racial equity. “More than 60 million Americans – one-fifth of the population – live in communities without a bank. They’re left either to travel long distances to handle their money or use more expensive nearby options like check-cashing companies, payday lenders and currency exchanges,” writes Friedline. Boston University’s Center for Antiracist Research and The Boston Globe’s Opinion team are collaborating to resurrect and reimagine The Emancipator, the first abolitionist newspaper in the United States, founded more than 200 years ago.

  2. Terri L. Friedline
     
    Terri Friedline Shares Overdraft Fees Research with U.S. House Committee on Financial Services

    Associate Professor Terri Friedline was invited to share her research on overdraft fees with the U.S. House Committee on Financial Services. Friedline is part of a nationwide movement to eliminate overdraft fees which are excessive, predatory, and punish lower-income people for not having enough money in the bank.

  3. Terri L. Friedline
     
    Terri Friedline’s Research on Postal Banking Featured in The Conversation

    Associate Professor Terri Friedline discusses her research in The Conversation on how postal banking could provide a financial lifeline to the millions of Americans without a bank account.

    According to data, 24% of U.S. census tracts  have neither a community bank nor a credit union branch, leaving 21 million people "underbanked." The lack of affordable banking creates real hardships that disproportionately hurt low-income Americans and communities of color. Without a bank account, people pay higher fees and interest rates, have a harder time building credit history and are less able to get mortgages and other kinds of loans, writes Friedline.

  4. Terri L. Friedline
     
    Terri Friedline publishes “Powerful alternatives to predatory lenders: Postal Service banking and public banks” in the Chicago Sun Times

    Associate Professor Terri Friedline and her co-author argue in their commentary “Powerful alternatives to predatory lenders: Postal Service banking and public banks” that the payday and auto title loan industry exists only because there are so many communities in the United States lacking even one traditional bank. The commentary was published in the Chicago Sun Times.

  5. Terri L. Friedline
     
    Terri Friedline's New Book "Banking on a Revolution Why Financial Technology Won't Save a Broken System" Published by Oxford Press

    Associate Professor Terri Friedline’s new book, “Banking on a Revolution Why Financial Technology Won't Save a Broken System,” takes a critical look at advancements in financial technology (“fintech”) in the banking and financial industries, and makes the case for a more inclusive financial system. "Banking on a Revolution" is deeply rooted in theory and research, and it presents new interpretations of the climate crisis, student loan debt, and community benefits agreements and their relationships to the financial system. The book makes a compelling case for a revolutionized financial system that centers the needs, experiences, and perspectives of those it has historically excluded, marginalized, and exploited. 

    "To create a more equitable and democratized financial system, we need to shift the balance of power away from banks and lenders and toward people,” says Friedline. “Social movements can shift power imbalances and hold institutions accountable for the racist inequalities they have created — tasks for which fintech was not really designed."

  6. Terri L. Friedline
     
    How Government Relief Affects Small-Dollar Loans

    Associate Professor Terri Friedline discusses the drop in demand for small-dollar loans with Morning Consult.  Without additional government relief, she expects “things to get a lot worse as people are forced to take on debt, including higher-cost, small-dollar loans, to survive the pandemic.”

     

     

  7. Terri L. Friedline
     
    Terri Friedline Named a U-M Mentor Fellow for Public Engagement

    Associate Professor Terri Friedline has been selected for the U-M 2020 cohort of the Public Engagement Fellowship. Mentor fellows are faculty with more extensive experience in public engagement and will work closely with Fellows to provide guidance, connections and mentorship based on their own expertise and networks. Although planning for the Public Engagement Fellowship started before COVID-19, the current situation highlights how important programs like these are in preparing scholars for engagement - both in moments of crisis and over the long-term.

  8. Terri L. Friedline
     
    Stimulus Checks Might Not Reach Those Who Need Them Most

    Associate Professor Terri Friedline discusses financial system reform and consumer protections to ensure that people and communities have access to safe and affordable financial products and services during the Coronavirus Pandemic.

  9. Terri L. Friedline
     
    Terri Friedline’s Research Informs the Automatic BOOST to Communities Act

    Associate Professor Terri Friedline’s research, “Mapping Financial Opportunity” can be used to inform the Automatic BOOST to Communities Act drafted by Rashida Tlaib, U.S. Representative for Michigan's 13th congressional district. In response to the coronavirus crisis, the proposed legislation would immediately provide a U.S. debit card preloaded with $2,000 to every person in America, which could be transitioned into a universal federal or postal banking account. Each card would be recharged with $1,000 monthly until one year after the end of the coronavirus crisis. Friedline's research focuses on universal bank account access and she maps post office locations to inform the potential for postal banking.

    • March 23, 2020
  10. Terri L. Friedline
     
    Terri Friedline’s Research Uncovers Racialized Costs of Banking

    Associate Professor 

    Terri Friedline’s research on racialized costs of banking was highlighted in a recent CBS News story, “Blacks and Latinos say they pay higher bank fees — research suggests they're right.” Friedline’s research found that the average cost of maintaining a checking account was $262.09 higher for Latinos, $190.09 higher for blacks and $25.53 higher for Asian-Americans when compared to white customers.

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