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Susan C. McDonough

Research Associate Professor Emerita of Social Work

Susan C. McDonough is an associate research scientist in the School of Social Work and in the Center for Human Growth and Development and is involved in research, teaching, and clinical work with families of young children. Her research program is funded through NIMH and follows 260 infants and their families throughout the first four years of the children's lives. These studies explore how environmental risk factors and parent-infant relationship problems mediate the connection between early behavior problems and later emotional, social, and cognitive functioning. Her publications address overburdened families, parent-infant relationship problems, adolescent parents, and families caring for special-needs babies. McDonough is the coordinator of the school's Post-Master Certificate Program in Work with Infants, Toddlers, and Their Families (Infant Mental Health Certificate Program). She also is a research scientist at the U-M Center for Human Growth and Development. Other areas of research/scholarly interest: children and families; interpersonal practice.

Research Interests/Focus

Children's mental health, preventive interventions.

Education

Year Degree   School
1981 PhD Special Education: Infancy University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
1992 MSW Social Work Smith College, Northampton, MA
1974 MA Special Education Northeastern University, Boston, MA
1972 BS Child Development Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL

McDonough, S. C. (2012). Engaging overburdened families through short-term treatment. In C. H. Zeanah (Ed.), Handbook of Infant Mental Health (3rd ed.). New York: Guilford Press.

McDonough, S. C. (2009). Do fussy babies grow up to be problem preschoolers? In S. Olson & A. Sameroff (Eds.), Regulatory Processes in the Development of Child Behavior Problems: Biological, Behavioral and Social Perspectives. New York: Guilford Press.

Rosenblum, K. L., McDonough, S. C., Muzik, M., & Sameroff, A. J. (2008). Reflection in thought and action: Maternal parenting reflectivity predicts mind-minded comments and interactive behavior. Infant Mental Health Journal, 29(4), 362-376.

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