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Disclaimer

These courses may have been taken by previous Social Work students or may have been identified as of possible interest to Social Work students. Some courses may be restricted and/or not open to Social Work students. There are many other courses not listed offered elsewhere in the university that may be of interest. Interest in courses numbered below 500 should be checked for graduate level status since many are only offered for undergraduate credit. You can check this by contacting the department offering the course or contacting the SSW Registrar.

The information may not be up to date or complete. Please seek additional information from the department where the course is offered and from the instructors of the course. We strongly recommend you discuss your plans to take outside courses with your advisor to make sure they are a good fit for your educational program.

Social Change SOC 460

School: Sociology
Credits: 3
Course Description: Economic globalization is one of the most powerful drivers of social change in the contemporary world. This course asks what economic globalization is, why it takes the form that it does, and how it affects the lives and livelihoods of the more vulnerable working people in the bottom half of the income distributions of the poor countries of the global South and the rich countries of the global North. We survey the range of economic realities faced by the men, women and children who labor for their income in these locations within their economies. We consider the structural changes in those realities that have occurred over the last quarter century, and the causes of those changes. We consider the kinds of reforms to the existing, neoliberal model of global economic regulation demanded by workers' organizations and their allies, and debates over the likely consequences of these changes. Finally, we consider whether (and if so, how) the U.S. labor movement and its allies can increase their political power enough to make the U.S. government an active contributor to the global economic regulation reforms favored by organized labor.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Robinson, IanMon, WedG020 TMC32034

Political Sociology SOC 460

School: Sociology
Credits: 4
Course Description: Structure and change of minorities in society; theories and research: historical, contemporary, and comparative; processes of adjustment: patterns of immigration, prejudice, discrimination, assimilation, pluralism, conflict, and social movements.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Robinson, IanMon, WedG020 TMC32034

Human Rights SOC 475

School: Sociology
Credits: 2-4
Prerequisites: SOC 100 or consent of instructor.
Course Description: Examines the idea of human rights: human rights in liberal democracies, especially in the United States; in pre-industrial societies; in totalitarian states. Studies human rights and cultural evolution; justification of human rights.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Jackson, Brianna TMon, WedAUD B AH25766
002Jackson, Brianna TFri1359 MH25767
003Jackson, Brianna TFri2330 MH25768
004Jackson, Brianna TFri1460 MH25769

Introduction to Medical Sociology SOC 475

School: Sociology
Credits: 3
Course Description: This course provides students with an understanding of the influence of social factors on health, illness and medical treatment. Topics to be covered include: the social nature of disease and illness, the social organization of medical care, medical education, the growth of alternative health care systems, medical ethics/bioethics, the ecology of health care, and the connection between faith, healing and medicine. We will also consider the way society influences our thinking about illness by exploring references to illness in literature and everyday discourse.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Jackson, Brianna TMon, WedAUD B AH25766
002Jackson, Brianna TFri1359 MH25767
003Jackson, Brianna TFri2330 MH25768
004Jackson, Brianna TFri1460 MH25769

Classical Sociological Theory SOC 475

School: Sociology
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Classical Sociological Theory
Course Description: Classical theory; Marx, Durkheim, Weber, and other important classical theorists and schools of thought.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Jackson, Brianna TMon, WedAUD B AH25766
002Jackson, Brianna TFri1359 MH25767
003Jackson, Brianna TFri2330 MH25768
004Jackson, Brianna TFri1460 MH25769

Community Organizing SOC 475

School: Sociology
Credits: 4
Course Description: Explores community organizing history, theory and practice. Emphasizes development of conceptual framework/practical skills for organizing effectively in the community for social, environmental and economic justice

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Jackson, Brianna TMon, WedAUD B AH25766
002Jackson, Brianna TFri1359 MH25767
003Jackson, Brianna TFri2330 MH25768
004Jackson, Brianna TFri1460 MH25769

Theories and Practices of Sociology SOC 505

School: Sociology
Credits: 4
Prerequisites: Graduate Standing
Course Description: SOC 505 is the first term of a year-long course surveying the theories and practices of sociology. During this academic term, we trace the lineaments and genealogies of major approaches in social theory, including utilitarianism, Marxism and neo-Marxism, cultural structuralism, post-structuralism, and Weberian and Polanyian perspectives. We also explore various attempts by theorists to integrate these approaches. The course remains deliberately open-ended; we seek to convey a sense of what “doing theory” is all about, rather than envisioning a final theoretical or practical resolution. The course follows a lecture format, although there will also be opportunity for seminar-style class discussions. Students will be required to participate in several shorter writing exercises and to produce a research paper in dialogue with the broad themes of the course. This course is required of graduate students in Sociology.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Krippner, Greta RMon, Wed4147 LSA11795

Statistics SOC 510

School: Sociology
Credits: 4
Prerequisites: Graduate Standing
Course Description: This course is the first of a two-semester sequence required of all sociology department graduate students. It consists of two weekly class sessions plus a lab-discussion. In the first semester we cover basic concepts of probability, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and statistical inference. The lab sessions will be used to discuss problems encountered in the lectures and written assignments and to develop statistical computing skills. The course assumes no prior knowledge of statistics and no mathematical knowledge beyond high school algebra. Please note that this is not a course in statistical theory, but rather one on the applied use of statistical methods for the analysis of social science data. As such, it will explore many topics but not deal with any of them in great depth. Those who are contemplating more advanced work involving statistical methods should consider taking other courses that do delve more deeply into statistical theory, of which there are a variety on campus.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001O'Meara, MaiaMon, Wed3242 LSA11796
002O'Meara, MaiaFri4260 LSA11797
003Eno, Jared PongFri4260 LSA28208

Social Demography SOC 530

School: Sociology
Credits: 3
Course Description: This course is a graduate-level survey of population studies. An overview of the content is given in the course outline below. The primary emphasis is on demographic behavior as a dependent variable. In addition to examining substantive issues, considerable emphasis is given to basic demographic concepts and measurement.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Anderson, Barbara A-AUD D AH25775

Race and Ethnic Relations SOC 530

School: Sociology
Credits: 4
Course Description: Majority-minority group relations; special attention to nature and results of black-white and ethnic group relations in the United States.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Anderson, Barbara A-AUD D AH25775

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