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Outside Classes

Disclaimer

These courses may have been taken by previous Social Work students or may have been identified as of possible interest to Social Work students. Some courses may be restricted and/or not open to Social Work students. There are many other courses not listed offered elsewhere in the university that may be of interest. Interest in courses numbered below 500 should be checked for graduate level status since many are only offered for undergraduate credit. You can check this by contacting the department offering the course or contacting the SSW Registrar.

The information may not be up to date or complete. Please seek additional information from the department where the course is offered and from the instructors of the course. We strongly recommend you discuss your plans to take outside courses with your advisor to make sure they are a good fit for your educational program.

Use of Information SI 501

School: Information, School of
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Contact Department or Instructor
Course Description: Students electing SI 501 MUST also register for one of the discussion group sessions. Engages students in the central professional and academic commitment of the School: that better professional practice and better academic knowledge both rest on understanding the actual use of information in real work settings. Provides controlled introductory exercises in using alternate approaches to investigate user needs, exposes students to the many emerging information professions, and elucidates the professional and ethical standards and commitments to service that form a deep component of the School's professional training. Introduces students to the reference interview, software and hardware requirements analysis, cost analysis, laboratory evaluation of prototypes, and other approaches to user-centered needs analysis and design.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Haque, HalimaMonAUD 4 MLB23810
004Prosper, SonyMon1175 NQ23811
002Chalmers, MelissaMonAUD C AH23812
003Toyama, KentaroMon1255 NQ23813
005Toyama, KentaroMon2011 MLB31705
006Prosper, SonyMon2185 NQ31706
007Toyama, KentaroMon506 BMT31707
008Chalmers, MelissaMon2011 MLB31708
009Toyama, KentaroMon2011 MLB31709
010Chalmers, MelissaMon2011 MLB31735
011Toyama, Kentaro-1448 MH31736
013Toyama, Kentaro-2185 NQ31737
012Jung, Ju YeonMon1110 NQ38233
014Jung, Ju YeonMon1185 NQ38234
015Toyama, KentaroMon2306 MH38754

Social Systems & Collections SI 504

School: Information, School of
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Contact Department or Instructor
Course Description: Students electing SI 504 MUST also register for one of the discussion group sessions. Considers collections of information resources in the broadest sense of the term. Includes libraries and archives, business records, research data, personal files, art collections, and other sets of information items held by individuals or groups for later use. Deepens understanding of fundamental social processes within which such collections are embedded, and the processes that shape their creation, use, and meaning. Fosters the synthesis of collections and social systems by showing how collected information simultaneously results from ongoing social processes and affects them.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Bhattacharya, Arunima-1255 NQ31741

Introduction to Health Informatics SI 542

School: Information, School of
Prerequisites: Graduate status
Course Description: Introduction to the concepts and practices of health informatics. Topics include: a) major applications and commercial vendors; b) decision support methods and technologies; c) analysis, design, implementation, and evaluation of healthcare information systems; and d) new opportunities and emerging trends.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Swallow, Jennylee Susannah Thompson-REMOTE20615

Introduction to Interaction Design SI 582

School: Information, School of
Course Description: This course will provide students with a hands-on introduction to interaction design. The course will focus on design methods and design thinking, and will allow students to develop their design sensibilities and practical skills through a series of design exercises. The course will cover individual and group ideation techniques; and contemporary perspectives on interaction design for common platforms (e.g., web, desktop, tablet, mobile, and beyond). The course will combine readings, lectures, and in-class exercises to convey and reinforce the intellectual content. Individual and group assignments will provide an opportunity to engage more deeply with the material. The course work may include substantial individual/group project at the end of the course or a semester-long individual project. In-class presentations, along with group critique will allow students to receive feedback from peers and instructors to improve and refine their craft. In-class discussions will rely heavily on concrete examples that are analyzed and critiqued by students and instructors alike, and are used to illustrate and reinforce the course content.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Zhang, QiaoningMonREMOTE20678
002Lumanauw, Catherine ThereseWed1255 NQ20679
003Kim, Sangmi-1255 NQ24678
004Sun, Kaiwen-1255 NQ25770

Managing Accountability Through Recordkeeping SI 583

School: Information, School of
Course Description: Intensive overview for managing information as a critical organizational asset and the various accountability risks associated with their neglect. Social, legal, and policy requirements such as trust, evidence, compliance, and social transformation will be examined alongside ongoing tensions between preservation and destruction, secrecy and transparency, and privacy and openness.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Wallace, David A-4151 USB31712

Media for Children and Young Adults SI 624

School: Information, School of
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: SI 501 (or taken concurrently) or permission of instructor
Course Description: Course reflects "children's culture," including television, movies, games, toys, etc.. As well as being a survey course covering the media and culture of children and young adults, this course serves as an "introductory" course to give students information and skills that they can use in other SI courses in which they might be working on or with materials for children and young adults. Content includes resources for the study of media for children and young adults (bibliographies, journals, review publications, critical writings, Internet sites, organizations, awards and best books lists, etc.); characteristics and interests of the age groups; history and development, including current publishing trends of media for children and young adults; evaluative criteria for media; illustrations in children's media; potential use and value of this media in a variety of settings (libraries, schools, museums, zoos, hospitals, homes, Internet, etc.); and, of course, the media itself (materials for babies and pre-schoolers, picture books, chapter books, fiction, young adult novels, informational and reference materials, films and videos, filmstrips, audio/sound recordings, computer applications, multimedia CD-ROMs, Internet/Web sites, movies, television and radio programs, games, toys, etc.). Format is lecture with class discussion and possible guest speakers. Students are required to read/view, etc., and critically evaluate a large number of media items and keep a journal or log of this reading, viewing, listening, observing, etc. There may also be some short "evaluative" assignments. There is an individual project or term paper.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Bhomia, Neha-2062 PALM37325

Social Theory SOC 440

School: Sociology
Credits: 3
Course Description: An overview and critical review of sociological theorists who serve as the basis for sociological research. Focusing on the last 150 years, the course includes the works of Marx, Weber, Durkheim and Simmel, as well as many schools of thought, including Functionalism, neo-Marxism, Symbolic Interactionism, Phenomenology, Ethnomethodology, Exchange Theory, Feminist Theory, Structuralism and Post-Structuralism. Besides becoming acquainted with each of these approaches, the student will also become aware of the strengths and weaknesses of each.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Cech, Erin AnnMon, Wed3463 MH24514

Sociology of Work SOC 440

School: Sociology
Course Description: This course offers a comprehensive sociological view of the workplace, including job satisfaction and the meaning of work for the worker; the interaction of work and family; issues of class, race, and gender in the workplace; and employee collective participation in the workplace through unions and other organizational forms. The course examines marginal work, unemployment, and the problems that accompany inadequate work. A major part of the course will examine contemporary occupations, with special attention to the roles of the professions and management. We will also study industrial transformation and the roles that technology, corporate structure, and globalization play in this transformation. Throughout the course, there is an emphasis on research methods used to study work, including official labor force statistics and ethnography.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Cech, Erin AnnMon, Wed3463 MH24514

Soc of Aging SOC 440

School: Sociology
Credits: 3
Course Description: Analysis of aging in its social and social-psychological aspects throughout the lifespan. Emphasis on particular social problems of the elderly, including retirement, widowhood, suicide, housing, income maintenance, attitudes toward death and dying and more

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Cech, Erin AnnMon, Wed3463 MH24514

Sociology of Gender SOC 460

School: Sociology
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: SOC 101.
Course Description: Theoretical and empirical literature on family and sex roles; socialization, changing nature of women's and men's roles, and prospects for future. Institutional sources of women's and men's roles in other cultures.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Robinson, IanMon, WedG020 TMC32034

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