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Outside Classes

Disclaimer

These courses may have been taken by previous Social Work students or may have been identified as of possible interest to Social Work students. Some courses may be restricted and/or not open to Social Work students. There are many other courses not listed offered elsewhere in the university that may be of interest. Interest in courses numbered below 500 should be checked for graduate level status since many are only offered for undergraduate credit. You can check this by contacting the department offering the course or contacting the SSW Registrar.

The information may not be up to date or complete. Please seek additional information from the department where the course is offered and from the instructors of the course. We strongly recommend you discuss your plans to take outside courses with your advisor to make sure they are a good fit for your educational program.

Data Analysis Using Excel I PUBPOL 647

School: Public Policy
Credits: 1.5
Course Description: This course will provide students with a practical hands-on introduction to data analysis using Microsoft Excel. Given the widespread usage of Microsoft Excel in the workplace, the aim of the course is to enable students to become proficient in the professional use of the software application. Topics will include: data collection and management, data tables, scenario analysis, optimization using the solver tool, graphical and numerical techniques for summarizing data, and macros. No previous experience with Microsoft Excel is required.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Worthington, Alton Boyd Hale-3117 WEILL27761

Digitization for Preservation SI 675

School: Information, School of
Credits: 1.5
Course Description: This course focuses on digitization for preservation. As such, this course concentrates on the standards, techniques, metadata, and long-term maintenance of digitally reborn images. The course also touches on why libraries and archives might want to digitize for preservation, building digital collections, and policy setting around digitally reborn objects.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Conway, Paul L-1265 NQ24221

Race and Culture SOC 503

School: Sociology
Credits: 3
Course Description: In this seminar we will examine different patterns of race and ethnic relations from a historical and comparative perspective. We examine how the belief in racial superiority evolved over time and in different places: the U.S. South, Brazil, Nazi Germany. In so doing, we also examine slavery, the plantation society, genocide, as well as the Indian caste system. The experience of the racial minorities is contrasted with that of the voluntary immigrants. We also seek to asses the impact of the Civil Rights Movement on contemporary outcomes in America and to examine contemporary problems, such as those of the persistent poverty of the underclass and segregation.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Kim, JaeeunWed4128 LSA22972

Sociology of Health & Aging SOC 575

School: Sociology
Credits: 3
Course Description: This course will explore the social aspects of health, aging and the health care system. We will examine such issues as the social causation of disease, relationships between doctors and patients, the health care professions, health and health care among women and the poor, and the current health care crises in the U.S. and cross-national contexts.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Anspach, Renee-G437 MH29082

UM at University of Melbourne, Australia STDABRD 489

School: Studies Abroad
Course Description: The University of Melbourne's Faculty of Arts offers courses in a wide range of disciplines including Women's Studies, Australian and Asian Studies, and English Literature. The Australia Centre, part of the Faculty of Arts, has developed a course for study abroad and other international students entitled "Australia Now," which provides students with an introduction to Australian history and politics and requires them to develop a research project on some aspect of modern-day Australia.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
TBDTBD- 11989

Advanced Topics in Gender in a Global Context WOMENSTD 435

School: Women's Studies
Credits: 3
Course Description: Globalization and the fast travel of people, ideas, and money have contributed to the flourishing of a human rights and humanitarian cultures and a growing net-work of transnational actors and activists fighting for justice, development, and social change in Africa. This course asks how do human rights and humanitarian actors do work in Africa. To what extent have the discourses and practices of these actors and activists raised awareness about such realities and influence political and economic transformation? In what situations have these discourses and practices reproduced colonial imageries and perpetuated global disparities? And how do such practices challenge ideas of national sovereignty and borderlines? This course respond to these questions and surveys a diverse range of debates among the supporters and critics of human rights and humanitarian intervention in Africa. The course situates these debates in histories of colonial and postcolonial encounters and global relations of power and inequalities. The class also analyze these discourses and practices with reference to local politics and realities of uneven development that produce gender, class, and ethnic disparities in Africa (and elsewhere). Course Requirements: Requirements would vary according to instructor, but typically include selected readings with the grade based partially on participation in discussions, a research paper (20- 25 pp), and 2 exams.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Caulfield, SueannMon, Wed1508 EQ32511
002Rai, Swapnil-1175 NQ36879
TBDTBD-36880

Gender and Representation in the Modern Middle East WOMENSTD 496

School: Women's Studies
Credits: 3
Course Description: This course will examine the many different ways that gender and female and male subjectivities "of" the Middle East are constructed, represented, and deployed in a variety of literary and cultural forms, including the novel, short story, travel accounts, and visual images in film, photography, and painting. Topics we will explore include the veiling of women, genderized and sexualized aspects of the relationship portrayed and enacted between colonizer and colonized in the Middle Eastern context, images of women in nationalist discourse, constructions of masculinity and "manliness," challenges to and subversions of traditionally inscribed gender roles, etc. Close attention will be paid to differences between such representations which emerge as a result of who authors or creates them, and from what kind of gendered subject position — European/western men, European/western women, Middle Eastern men, Middle Eastern women.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Bardenstein, Carol BMon, Wed1110 NQ29723

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