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Outside Classes

Disclaimer

These courses may have been taken by previous Social Work students or may have been identified as of possible interest to Social Work students. Some courses may be restricted and/or not open to Social Work students. There are many other courses not listed offered elsewhere in the university that may be of interest. Interest in courses numbered below 500 should be checked for graduate level status since many are only offered for undergraduate credit. You can check this by contacting the department offering the course or contacting the SSW Registrar.

The information may not be up to date or complete. Please seek additional information from the department where the course is offered and from the instructors of the course. We strongly recommend you discuss your plans to take outside courses with your advisor to make sure they are a good fit for your educational program.

Introduction to Public Health Policy HMP 615

School: Health Management & Policy
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
Course Description: Describes the nature of public policy interventions within the various domains of public health, the theoretical motivations for undertaking them, the influence of the political, bureaucratic, and social environmental in which policy decisions are made, the consequences of such decisions, and the key dimensions of analysis of the effects of public health policies. In addition to conceptual discussion of each of the above, the course includes evaluation of several case studies of public health policy decisions and their implications.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Moore-Petinak, N'dea-REMOTE22213

Civil Procedure LAW 510

School: Law
Credits: 4
Prerequisites: Permission of professor required. Contact Department
Course Description: This course is similar to the introductory civil procedure courses taught at most law schools for the last two or three decades, with one major difference. In common with most courses, this course covers the basic institutions of civil litigation in an adversary jury trial system. Pleading, discovery, and other pretrial procedures are explored. Many trial topics are covered, with special emphasis on the procedural devices that arise out of the relationships among the parties, the judge, and the jury, the right to a jury trial, special verdicts, instructions to the jury, directed verdicts and judgments notwithstanding the verdict, new trials, and similar matters. Appeals and post-finality relief from judgments are included. At least the rudiments of claim and party joinder and res judicata also are covered. Unlike most first-year civil procedure, however, this course does not cover any of the variety of topics loosely described as jurisdiction. Those topics have been moved into the upper level elective course in Jurisdiction and Choice of Law.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Carroll, Maureen SMon, WedREMOTE33754
002Bagley, NicholasWed, FriREMOTE33755
003Niehoff, Leonard MarvinWed, FriREMOTE33756

Criminal Law LAW 530

School: Law
Credits: 4
Prerequisites: Permission of professor required. Contact Department
Course Description: This course examines the application of legal principles as a limitation on the definition of crime; the theories underlying criminal law; and the problems of the imposition and execution of sentences. Also examined are various specific areas of substantive criminal law, including: (1) general principles applicable to all crimes, e.g., mistake, causation, legal insanity, intoxication, and rules of justification and excuse; (2) accountability for the acts of others; and (3) attempt and conspiracy.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Moran, David AMon, WedREMOTE33764
002Mcquade, BarbaraWed, Fri0225 JEFFRIES34684
003Mcquade, BarbaraWed, Fri0225 JEFFRIES39128
004Mcquade, BarbaraWed, FriREMOTE39698
005Mcquade, BarbaraWed, FriREMOTE39699

Introduction to Constitutional Law LAW 540

School: Law
Credits: 4
Prerequisites: Permission of professor required. Contact Department
Course Description: This course introduces the student to certain fundamental cases in Constitutional law, to the questions they raise, and to the modes of thought and criticism appropriate to this field. There is necessarily a large historical component to the work, for the Constitution has acquired its meaning over time. Major questions include: What is the justification for judicial review? What are appropriate occasions and standards for the exercise of this power? How has the power actually been used throughout our history? These questions are considered in the context of doctrinal fields chosen for variety of issues and to allow consideration of historical development over the full life of the Constitution. These fields include: the scope of federal powers; preemption; state regulation of interstate commerce (in some sections); powers of the President; relations between branches of the federal government; basic principles of racial equal protection; Congressional enforcement power under the Reconstruction Amendments; and justiciability.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Bagenstos, Samuel RMon, WedREMOTE33758

Introduction to Constitutional Law and American Legal Process LAW 631

School: Law
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: This course is restricted to foreign students in the advanced degree program. Permission of professor required. Contact Department
Course Description: No Description Available

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Regan, Donald HFriREMOTE33891

Church and State LAW 636

School: Law
Credits: 2
Prerequisites: Permission of professor required. Contact Department
Course Description: No Description Available

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Abdelall, Brenda FathyFriREMOTE34142

International Trade Law LAW 695

School: Law
Credits: 3
Course Description: This course is a comprehensive introduction to the international legal framework for the regulation of international trade in goods and services. This course will include: an introduction to the economics and politics of trade; an examination of the World Trade Organization (WTO) and its dispute settlement machinery, the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), the General Agreement on Trade in Services GATS); the Agreement on Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures, and related instruments; and discussions of trade-related aspects of intellectual property rights, conflicts between trade policy and other concerns (such as human rights, environment and development), and the recent proliferation of bilaterial and regional trade agreements.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Regan, Donald HMon, WedREMOTE33890

Comparative Hum Rights Law LAW 756

School: Law
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Permission of professor required. Contact Department
Course Description: The course involves a study of human rights issues drawing on material primarily from Europe and North America, and the Commonwealth. The course considers the meaning of particular human rights and their significance in theory and in practice, and the efficacy of the legal institutions designed to protect them. Several specific substantive issues (minority rights, freedom of speech, privacy, and equality) will be studied in depth to illustrate the complex interplay between theory, legal concepts and procedure, and between legal and non-legal sources of protection. It will draw on international human rights law, but will not be confined to it. The course as a whole will aim to provide the opportunity for in-depth comparative study, during which the appropriateness and utility of comparative legal techniques will be considered. There is no expectation that those taking the course will have taken any other course previously.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001McCrudden, John ChristopherWed, FriREMOTE33856

Global Supply Chain Management MKT 640

School: Ross School of Business, Marketing
Credits: 2.25
Course Description: Global Supply Chain Management --- Supply chain is the central nervous system of the global economy. Supply chain consists of all activities involved in fulfilling a customer request. Effective management of supply chain entails management of material, information and financial flows. Supply chain is perhaps the only discipline and business function in an organization that cuts across functional boundaries. Globalization of economy has heightened the strategic importance and of supply chain management and created new opportunities for using supply chain strategy and planning as a competitive tool. Inter- and intra-firm coordination issues are becoming critical for effective management of the supply chain. Depending on the industry sector, supply chain related costs account for 20-25% of a typical firm's total cost. On the revenue side, the supply chain decisions have a direct impact on the market penetration and customer service. Specific learning goals for this course are: -- Develop a general manager?s perspective on key issues in designing and managing end-to-end global supply chains. -- Know that effective management of end-to-end supply chain entails management of material, information and financial flows. -- Develop an understanding of key drivers of supply chain performance and their inter-relationships with business strategy and other functions within the company such as marketing, manufacturing, accounting, and finance. -- Develop the ability to design and formulate integrated supply chain strategy, so that all components are not only internally synchronized but also tuned to fit corporate strategy, competitive realities and market needs. -- Develop an in depth understanding of elements of supply chain designs for efficiency, responsiveness, and variety. -- Understand the importance of intra-firm coordination strategies and the knowledge of how to execute on such strategies. -- Understand dynamics of flows across firm boundaries, reasons for lack of synchronization, and managerial actions to improve overall supply chain performance. -- Understand the importance risk management in the extended global supply chain; learn the key elements of a robust risk management system and develop execution plans.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Anupindi, Ravi MurthyMon, WedR0230 BUS19397
701Anupindi, Ravi MurthyMon, Wed 40186

Human Behavior & Organization MO 501

School: Ross School of Business, Management & Organizations
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: No credit in MO 503, 552
Course Description: Human Behavior and Organization --- The purpose of this course is to improve your effectiveness as a manager by introducing you to frameworks for understanding organizational processes and by giving you experience in applying these frameworks. The field of management and organizations is at the intersection of several social science disciplines and focuses on applying their insights to solving organizational problems and building organizational competencies. Topics include improving decision making, building networks, negotiation, power and politics, organization design, motivation and compensation systems, and leading (and surviving) organizational change.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
TBDTBDMonR0220 BUS17776

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