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Outside Classes

Disclaimer

These courses may have been taken by previous Social Work students or may have been identified as of possible interest to Social Work students. Some courses may be restricted and/or not open to Social Work students. There are many other courses not listed offered elsewhere in the university that may be of interest. Interest in courses numbered below 500 should be checked for graduate level status since many are only offered for undergraduate credit. You can check this by contacting the department offering the course or contacting the SSW Registrar.

The information may not be up to date or complete. Please seek additional information from the department where the course is offered and from the instructors of the course. We strongly recommend you discuss your plans to take outside courses with your advisor to make sure they are a good fit for your educational program.

The Health Services System II HMP 601

School: Health Management & Policy
Credits: 4
Prerequesites: Permission of instructor
Course Description: Second part of two-course sequence focusing on major issues in the organization of a health services system: private and public financing of health services; quality of care assessment; control of the quality and costs of care through market-oriented strategies, professional self-regulation, managerial approaches, and government regulation; and system reform.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
TBDTBD-1755 SPH113409
777Joshi, Maulik Sharad- 29408
003Joshi, Maulik Sharad- 30577

Individual and Group Behavior in Health Service Organizations HMP 643

School: Health Management & Policy
Credits: 3
Prerequesites: Permission of instructor
Course Description: This course provides the knowledge and skills for understanding and effectively managing individuals and groups within health care organizations. We consider a wide variety of motivations that draw individuals to their jobs and keep them productive. We also consider why organizations form small groups and the dynamics of these groups over time. Students learn techniques for persuasive communication and conflict management, develop strategies for dealing with interpersonal problems in an organizational setting, and processes for handling work teams. Common organizational problems that students solve include choosing the right person through the hiring process, evaluating employee performance, and negotiating contracts.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Dotson, Ebbin Dajuan-2695 SPH1A28622

The Politics of Health Policy HMP 685

School: Health Management & Policy
Credits: 3
Prerequesites: Permission of instructor
Course Description: Analysis of the process of health care policy formation, with emphasis on institutional determinants of health policy including congress, the presidency, the budget, interest groups, the bureaucracy and models of the policy process. Includes a course-long policy analysis project demonstrating how to do policy analysis, and producing expertise on a policy topic chosen by the student. Examples emphasize the role of institutions and key actors in making health policy choices.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Jarman, HollyMon, Wed2695 SPH1A27193

Civil Procedure LAW 510

School: Law
Credits: 4
Prerequesites: Permission of professor required. Contact Department
Course Description: This course is similar to the introductory civil procedure courses taught at most law schools for the last two or three decades, with one major difference. In common with most courses, this course covers the basic institutions of civil litigation in an adversary jury trial system. Pleading, discovery, and other pretrial procedures are explored. Many trial topics are covered, with special emphasis on the procedural devices that arise out of the relationships among the parties, the judge, and the jury, the right to a jury trial, special verdicts, instructions to the jury, directed verdicts and judgments notwithstanding the verdict, new trials, and similar matters. Appeals and post-finality relief from judgments are included. At least the rudiments of claim and party joinder and res judicata also are covered. Unlike most first-year civil procedure, however, this course does not cover any of the variety of topics loosely described as jurisdiction. Those topics have been moved into the upper level elective course in Jurisdiction and Choice of Law.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Seinfeld, GilWed, Fri0225 JEFFRIES10024

Criminal Law LAW 530

School: Law
Credits: 4
Prerequesites: Permission of professor required. Contact Department
Course Description: This course examines the application of legal principles as a limitation on the definition of crime; the theories underlying criminal law; and the problems of the imposition and execution of sentences. Also examined are various specific areas of substantive criminal law, including: (1) general principles applicable to all crimes, e.g., mistake, causation, legal insanity, intoxication, and rules of justification and excuse; (2) accountability for the acts of others; and (3) attempt and conspiracy.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Moran, David AFri120 HUTCH10026

Introduction to Constitutional Law LAW 540

School: Law
Credits: 4
Prerequesites: Permission of professor required. Contact Department
Course Description: This course introduces the student to certain fundamental cases in Constitutional law, to the questions they raise, and to the modes of thought and criticism appropriate to this field. There is necessarily a large historical component to the work, for the Constitution has acquired its meaning over time. Major questions include: What is the justification for judicial review? What are appropriate occasions and standards for the exercise of this power? How has the power actually been used throughout our history? These questions are considered in the context of doctrinal fields chosen for variety of issues and to allow consideration of historical development over the full life of the Constitution. These fields include: the scope of federal powers; preemption; state regulation of interstate commerce (in some sections); powers of the President; relations between branches of the federal government; basic principles of racial equal protection; Congressional enforcement power under the Reconstruction Amendments; and justiciability.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Bagenstos, Samuel RWed1225 JEFFRIES10027
002Halberstam, Daniel HWed, Fri220 HUTCH10028
003Litman, Leah MihalchickWed, Fri1225 JEFFRIES10029
004Primus, Richard AMon, Wed120 HUTCH10181
TBDTBD-0225 JEFFRIES10188

Family Law LAW 673

School: Law
Credits: 3
Prerequesites: Permission of professor required. Contact Department
Course Description: This course surveys the legal doctrines and policies concerning state regulation of marriage, marital dissolution, the allocation of family wealth upon dissolution (including spousal support and child support), and child custody determination. Special attention will be devoted to the effects of the changing roles of men and women on traditional family law doctrine. The course is national in scope.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Myers, Maude AmeliaMon220 HUTCH10127

Social Marketing MKT 614

School: Ross School of Business, Marketing
Credits: 1.5
Prerequesites: MKT 501 or MKT 503
Course Description: This course explores social marketing and consumer culture from managerial and ethical perspectives. The overall thrust of the course will be on using marketing methods to benefit the public interest. Topics will include: social marketing such as anti-smoking campaigns; corporate social responsibility and cause related marketing; marketing in nonprofit organizations; green marketing; economic and sociological perspectives on consumer culture; the psychology of happiness and how personal well-being is influenced by wealth, consumption, and materialism; and public policy concerns related to marketing and advertising.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
001Metzger, Michael Daniel-R1220 BUS28522
451Metzger, Michael Daniel- 30052

Global Supply Chain Management MKT 640

School: Ross School of Business, Marketing
Credits: 2.25
Course Description: Global Supply Chain Management --- Supply chain is the central nervous system of the global economy. Supply chain consists of all activities involved in fulfilling a customer request. Effective management of supply chain entails management of material, information and financial flows. Supply chain is perhaps the only discipline and business function in an organization that cuts across functional boundaries. Globalization of economy has heightened the strategic importance and of supply chain management and created new opportunities for using supply chain strategy and planning as a competitive tool. Inter- and intra-firm coordination issues are becoming critical for effective management of the supply chain. Depending on the industry sector, supply chain related costs account for 20-25% of a typical firm's total cost. On the revenue side, the supply chain decisions have a direct impact on the market penetration and customer service. Specific learning goals for this course are: -- Develop a general manager?s perspective on key issues in designing and managing end-to-end global supply chains. -- Know that effective management of end-to-end supply chain entails management of material, information and financial flows. -- Develop an understanding of key drivers of supply chain performance and their inter-relationships with business strategy and other functions within the company such as marketing, manufacturing, accounting, and finance. -- Develop the ability to design and formulate integrated supply chain strategy, so that all components are not only internally synchronized but also tuned to fit corporate strategy, competitive realities and market needs. -- Develop an in depth understanding of elements of supply chain designs for efficiency, responsiveness, and variety. -- Understand the importance of intra-firm coordination strategies and the knowledge of how to execute on such strategies. -- Understand dynamics of flows across firm boundaries, reasons for lack of synchronization, and managerial actions to improve overall supply chain performance. -- Understand the importance risk management in the extended global supply chain; learn the key elements of a robust risk management system and develop execution plans.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
TBDTBDSatR2220 BUS18756
TBDTBDSatR2220 BUS20980

Bargaining and Influence Skills --- Negotiation Strategy in a Global Economy MO 512

School: Ross School of Business, Management & Organizations
Credits: 2.25
Prerequesites: Must Contact Department
Course Description: Given the experiential nature of pedagogy, enrollment in each section will be limited and attendance is mandatory. Registered students must be present from the beginning of the first class session to retain their registration in the class. This course is complementary to LHC 510. Students interested in developing strong negotiation skills are encouraged to take both MO 512 and LHC 510 in either order.

Offerings

SectionInstructorDaysLocationU-M Class #
004Kopelman, Shirli J-B3580 BUS16993
002Kopelman, Shirli JMon, WedB3580 BUS17395
003Kopelman, Shirli J-B3580 BUS17762
451Morgan, Laurie AWedR2230 BUS18130
005Morgan, Laurie A-B0560 BUS18131
006Morgan, Laurie A-R0220 BUS21590

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